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Open AccessArticle

Hydration Efficacy of a Milk Permeate-Based Oral Hydration Solution

1
Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, PA 16802, USA
2
Sports Science Insights, LLC, Crystal Lake, McHenry County, IL 60014, USA
3
Graduate Program in Physiology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, PA 16802, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1502; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051502
Received: 24 April 2020 / Revised: 17 May 2020 / Accepted: 18 May 2020 / Published: 21 May 2020
Milk permeate is an electrolyte-rich, protein- and fat-free liquid with a similar carbohydrate and mineral content to that of milk. Its hydration efficacy has not been examined. The beverage hydration index (BHI) has been used to compare various beverages to water in terms of post-ingestion fluid balance and retention. Our purpose was to compare the BHI (and related physiological responses) of a novel milk permeate solution (MPS) to that of water and a traditional carbohydrate–electrolyte solution (CES). Over three visits, 12 young subjects consumed 1 L of water, CES, or MPS. Urine samples were collected immediately post-ingestion and at 60, 120, 180, and 240 min. BHI was calculated by dividing cumulative urine output after water consumption by cumulative urine output for each test beverage at each time point. The BHI for MPS was significantly higher at all time points compared to water (all p < 0.001) and CES (all p ≤ 0.01) but did not differ between CES and water at any time point. Drinking 1 L of MPS resulted in decreased cumulative urine output across the subsequent 4 h compared to water and CES, suggesting that a beverage containing milk permeate is superior to water and a traditional CES at sustaining positive fluid balance post-ingestion. View Full-Text
Keywords: dairy; sports drink; beverage hydration index; osmolality; electrolytes; fluid balance; plasma volume dairy; sports drink; beverage hydration index; osmolality; electrolytes; fluid balance; plasma volume
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Berry, C.W.; Wolf, S.T.; Murray, B.; Kenney, W.L. Hydration Efficacy of a Milk Permeate-Based Oral Hydration Solution. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1502.

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