Next Article in Journal
Mindfulness in Eating Is Inversely Related to Binge Eating and Mood Disturbances in University Students in Health-Related Disciplines
Next Article in Special Issue
The Effects of the Type of Exercise and Physical Activity on Eating Behavior and Body Composition in Overweight and Obese Subjects
Previous Article in Journal
Nutrition in Sepsis: A Bench-to-Bedside Review
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Impact of Coconut Oil and Epigallocatechin Gallate on the Levels of IL-6, Anxiety and Disability in Multiple Sclerosis Patients
 
 
Review

The Association between Energy Balance-Related Behavior and Burn-Out in Adults: A Systematic Review

1
Department of Movement and Sport Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium
2
Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands
3
Department of Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 397; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020397
Received: 28 November 2019 / Revised: 29 January 2020 / Accepted: 31 January 2020 / Published: 2 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Fitness: Mental Health)
Although it is believed that physical activity, sedentary, and dietary behavior (i.e., energy balance-related behavior) may decrease the risk of burn-out, the association between both is currently not well understood. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to synthesize studies investigating the relationship between energy balance-related behavior and burn-out risk. A systematic literature search was conducted in four databases, resulting in 25 included studies (ten experimental and 15 observational studies). Nine out of ten experimental studies showed that exercise programs were effective in reducing burn-out risk. Fourteen out of fifteen observational studies found a negative association between physical activity and burn-out risk, whereas one study did not find a relation. Two of the 15 observational studies also showed that being more sedentary was associated with a higher burn-out risk, and two other studies found that a healthier diet was related to a lower burn-out risk. No experimental studies were found for the latter two behaviors. It can be concluded that physical activity may be effective in reducing burn-out risk. The few observational studies linking sedentary and dietary behavior with burn-out risk suggest that being more sedentary and eating less healthy are each associated with higher burn-out risk. More high-quality research is needed to unravel the causal relationship between these two behaviors and burn-out risk. View Full-Text
Keywords: mental health; emotional exhaustion; cynicism; professional efficacy; physical activity; sedentary behavior; dietary behavior mental health; emotional exhaustion; cynicism; professional efficacy; physical activity; sedentary behavior; dietary behavior
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Verhavert, Y.; De Martelaer, K.; Van Hoof, E.; Van Der Linden, E.; Zinzen, E.; Deliens, T. The Association between Energy Balance-Related Behavior and Burn-Out in Adults: A Systematic Review. Nutrients 2020, 12, 397. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020397

AMA Style

Verhavert Y, De Martelaer K, Van Hoof E, Van Der Linden E, Zinzen E, Deliens T. The Association between Energy Balance-Related Behavior and Burn-Out in Adults: A Systematic Review. Nutrients. 2020; 12(2):397. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020397

Chicago/Turabian Style

Verhavert, Yanni, Kristine De Martelaer, Elke Van Hoof, Eline Van Der Linden, Evert Zinzen, and Tom Deliens. 2020. "The Association between Energy Balance-Related Behavior and Burn-Out in Adults: A Systematic Review" Nutrients 12, no. 2: 397. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020397

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop