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Protective Effect of α-Linolenic Acid on Non-Alcoholic Hepatic Steatosis and Interleukin-6 and -10 in Wistar Rats

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Graduate Program in Health and Development in the Midwest Region, Medical School, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande 79070-900, Brazil
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Medical School Clinics Hospital Residency Program, University of São Paulo, USP, Ribeirão Preto 14015-010, Brazil
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Institute of Biosciences, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande 79070-900, Brazil
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Biochemistry Sector, Institute of Biosciences, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande 79070-900, Brazil
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Research in Exercise and Nutrition in Health and Sports Performance - PENSARE, Graduate Program in Movement Sciences, UFMS, Campo Grande 79079-900, Brazil
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Posgraduate Program in Biotechnology and Biodiversity in the Central-West Region of Brazil, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande 79079-900, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010009
Received: 22 November 2019 / Revised: 9 December 2019 / Accepted: 14 December 2019 / Published: 18 December 2019
Consumption of omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) is related to improvement in the inflammatory response associated with decreases in metabolic disorders of obesity, such as low-grade inflammation and hepatic steatosis. Linseed (Linum usitatissimum) oil is a primary source of n-3 fatty acids (FAs) of plant origin, particularly α-linolenic acid, and provides an alternative for the ingestion of n-3 PUFA by persons allergic to, or wishing to avoid, animal sources. In our study, we evaluated the effect of the consumption of different lipidic sources on metabolic and inflammatory parameters in Wistar rats. We split 56 male rats into four groups that were fed for 60 days with the following diets: sesame oil, (SO, Sesamum indicum), linseed oil (LO), SO + LO (SLO), and a control group (CG) fed with animal fat. Our results reveal that the use of LO or SLO produced improvements in the hepatic tissue, such as lower values of aspartate aminotransferase, liver weight, and hepatic steatosis. LO and SLO reduced the weight of visceral fats, weight gain, and mediated the inflammation through a decrease in interleukin (IL)-6 and increase in IL-10. Though we did not detect any significant differences in the intestine histology and the purinergic system enzymes, the consumption of α-linolenic acid appears to contribute to the inflammatory and hepatic modulation of animals compared with a diet rich in saturated FAs and or unbalanced in n-6/n-3 PUFAs, inferring possible use in treatment of metabolic disorders associated with obesity and cardiovascular diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: fatty acids; omega-3; inflammation; steatosis fatty acids; omega-3; inflammation; steatosis
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Jordão Candido, C.; Silva Figueiredo, P.; Del Ciampo Silva, R.; Candeloro Portugal, L.; Augusto dos Santos Jaques, J.; Alves de Almeida, J.; de Barros Penteado, B.; Albuquerque Dias, D.; Marcelino, G.; Pott, A.; Avellaneda Guimarães, R.C.; Aiko Hiane, P. Protective Effect of α-Linolenic Acid on Non-Alcoholic Hepatic Steatosis and Interleukin-6 and -10 in Wistar Rats. Nutrients 2020, 12, 9.

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