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Article

Affective and Enjoyment Responses to Sprint Interval Exercise at Different Hypoxia Levels

1
Faculty of Education, University of Macau, Macao 999078, China
2
Institute of Physical Education, Huzhou University, Huzhou 313000, China
3
Exercise Psychophysiology Laboratory, Institute of KEEP Collaborative Innovation, School of Psychology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China
4
School of Health Sciences and Sports, Macao Polytechnic Institute, Macao 999078, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Olivier Dupuy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8171; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18158171
Received: 21 June 2021 / Revised: 29 July 2021 / Accepted: 30 July 2021 / Published: 2 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Health Outcomes of High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Training)
Benefits of performing sprint interval training (SIT) under hypoxic conditions on improving cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition have been well-documented, yet data is still lacking regarding affective responses to SIT under hypoxia. This study aimed to compare affective responses to SIT exercise under different oxygen conditions. Nineteen active males participated in three sessions of acute SIT exercise (20 repetitions of 6 s of all-out cycling bouts interspersed with 15 s of passive recovery) under conditions of normobaric normoxia (SL: PIO2 150 mmHg, FIO2 0.209), moderate hypoxia (MH: PIO2 117 mmHg, FIO2 0.154, simulating an altitude corresponding to 2500 m), and severe hypoxia (SH: PIO2 87 mmHg, FIO2 0.112, simulating an altitude of 5000 m) in a randomized order. Perceived exertions (RPE), affect, activation, and enjoyment responses were recorded before and immediately after each SIT session. There were no significant differences across the three conditions in RPE or the measurements of affective responses, despite a statistically lower SpO2 (%) in severe hypoxia. Participants maintained a positive affect valence and reported increased activation in all the three SIT conditions. Additionally, participants experienced a medium level of enjoyment after exercise as indicated by the exercise enjoyment scale (EES) and physical activity enjoyment scale (PACES). These results indicated that performing short duration SIT exercise under severe hypoxia could be perceived as pleasurable and enjoyable as performing it under normoxia in active male population. View Full-Text
Keywords: interval exercise; high-intensity interval training; pleasure; exercise adherence interval exercise; high-intensity interval training; pleasure; exercise adherence
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kong, Z.; Hu, M.; Sun, S.; Zou, L.; Shi, Q.; Jiao, Y.; Nie, J. Affective and Enjoyment Responses to Sprint Interval Exercise at Different Hypoxia Levels. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 8171. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18158171

AMA Style

Kong Z, Hu M, Sun S, Zou L, Shi Q, Jiao Y, Nie J. Affective and Enjoyment Responses to Sprint Interval Exercise at Different Hypoxia Levels. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(15):8171. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18158171

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kong, Zhaowei, Mingzhu Hu, Shengyan Sun, Liye Zou, Qingde Shi, Yubo Jiao, and Jinlei Nie. 2021. "Affective and Enjoyment Responses to Sprint Interval Exercise at Different Hypoxia Levels" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 15: 8171. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18158171

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