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Int. J. Mol. Sci., Volume 13, Issue 9 (September 2012) , Pages 10660-12152

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Open AccessArticle
Purification and Characterization of a Ginsenoside Rb1-Hydrolyzing β-Glucosidase from Aspergillus niger KCCM 11239
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 12140-12152; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130912140 - 24 Sep 2012
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3964
Abstract
Rb1-hydrolyzing β-glucosidase from Aspergillus niger KCCM 11239 was studied to develop a bioconversion process for minor ginsenosides. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was 46.5 times greater than that of the crude enzyme. The molecular weight of the native enzyme [...] Read more.
Rb1-hydrolyzing β-glucosidase from Aspergillus niger KCCM 11239 was studied to develop a bioconversion process for minor ginsenosides. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was 46.5 times greater than that of the crude enzyme. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to be approximately 123 kDa. The optimal pH of the purified enzyme was pH 4.0, and the enzyme proved highly stable over a pH range of 5.0–10.0. The optimal temperature was 70 °C, and the enzyme became unstable at temperatures above 60 °C. The enzyme was inhibited by Cu2+, Mg2+, Co2+, and acetic acid (10 mM). In the specificity tests, the enzyme was found to be active against ginsenoside Rb1, but showed very low levels of activity against Rb2, Rc, Rd, Re, and Rg1. The enzyme hydrolyzed the 20-C,β-(1→6)-glucoside of ginsenoside Rb1 to generate ginsenoside Rd and Rg3, and hydrolyzed 3-C,β-(1→2)-glucoside to generate F2. The properties of the enzyme indicate that it could be a useful tool in biotransformation applications in the ginseng industry, as well as in the development of novel drug compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme Optimization and Immobilization)
Open AccessArticle
Serum Autofluorescence, a Potential Serum Marker for the Diagnosis of Liver Fibrosis in Rats
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 12130-12139; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130912130 - 24 Sep 2012
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2897
Abstract
Fluctuations in serum autofluorescence (AF) intensity have recently been widely used as markers of certain diseases such as cancer. To determine the diagnostic value of serum AF intensity for liver fibrosis in rats, we induced liver fibrosis by subcutaneous injection of carbon tetrachloride [...] Read more.
Fluctuations in serum autofluorescence (AF) intensity have recently been widely used as markers of certain diseases such as cancer. To determine the diagnostic value of serum AF intensity for liver fibrosis in rats, we induced liver fibrosis by subcutaneous injection of carbon tetrachloride into rats. The rat serum AF intensities were detected at the excitation wavelength of 337 nm and the emission wavelength of 512 nm. The degree of liver fibrosis was evaluated by Van Gieson’s staining. The relationship between serum AF intensity and the degree of liver fibrosis was analyzed by Spearman and Pearson Correlation. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the serum AF was determined by analyzing the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Our results show that the serum AF intensity in the rat liver fibrosis model increased when compared with control rats eight weeks and twelve weeks post induction of liver fibrosis. However, there was no significant difference in serum AF intensity between fibrotic and control rats at four week post induction. Furthermore, serum AF intensity correlated positively with the severity of the degree of hepatic fibrosis. ROC analysis further suggested that serum AF intensity is a valid marker for staging fibrosis. Therefore, it may potentially be developed as a novel diagnostic tool for hepatic fibrosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)
Open AccessArticle
Gelam Honey Scavenges Peroxynitrite During the Immune Response
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 12113-12129; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130912113 - 24 Sep 2012
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3730
Abstract
Monocytes and macrophages are part of the first-line defense against bacterial, fungal, and viral infections during host immune responses; they express high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic molecules, including nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, and their reaction product peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite is a [...] Read more.
Monocytes and macrophages are part of the first-line defense against bacterial, fungal, and viral infections during host immune responses; they express high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic molecules, including nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, and their reaction product peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite is a short-lived oxidant and a potent inducer of cell death. Honey, in addition to its well-known sweetening properties, is a natural antioxidant that has been used since ancient times in traditional medicine. We examined the ability of Gelam honey, derived from the Gelam tree (Melaleuca spp.), to scavenge peroxynitrite during immune responses mounted in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide/interferon-γ (LPS/IFN-γ) and in LPS-treated rats. Gelam honey significantly improved the viability of LPS/IFN-γ-treated RAW 264.7 cells and inhibited nitric oxide production—similar to the effects observed with an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (1400W). Furthermore, honey, but not 1400W, inhibited peroxynitrite production from the synthetic substrate 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) and prevented the peroxynitrite-mediated conversion of dihydrorhodamine 123 to its fluorescent oxidation product rhodamine 123. Honey inhibited peroxynitrite synthesis in LPS-treated rats. Thus, honey may attenuate inflammatory responses that lead to cell damage and death, suggesting its therapeutic uses for several inflammatory disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry)
Open AccessArticle
Photophysical Behaviors of Single Fluorophores Localized on Zinc Oxide Nanostructures
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 12100-12112; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130912100 - 24 Sep 2012
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2539
Abstract
Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has now been widely used to investigate complex dynamic processes which would normally be obscured in an ensemble-averaged measurement. In this report we studied photophysical behaviors of single fluorophores in proximity to zinc oxide nanostructures by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and [...] Read more.
Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has now been widely used to investigate complex dynamic processes which would normally be obscured in an ensemble-averaged measurement. In this report we studied photophysical behaviors of single fluorophores in proximity to zinc oxide nanostructures by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC). Single fluorophores on ZnO surfaces showed enhanced fluorescence brightness to various extents compared with those on glass; the single-molecule time trajectories also illustrated pronounced fluctuations of emission intensities, with time periods distributed from milliseconds to seconds. We attribute fluorescence fluctuations to the interfacial electron transfer (ET) events. The fluorescence fluctuation dynamics were found to be inhomogeneous from molecule to molecule and from time to time, showing significant static and dynamic disorders in the interfacial electron transfer reaction processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Single Molecule Spectroscopy)
Open AccessTechnical Note
Microsatellite Markers for the Chameleon Grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), an Australian Alpine Specialist
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 12094-12099; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130912094 - 24 Sep 2012
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3174
Abstract
A set of polymorphic loci was characterised using an enrichment library for the Australian alpine specialist, the chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis), an atypical grasshopper known for its remarkable temperature-controlled colour change. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to [...] Read more.
A set of polymorphic loci was characterised using an enrichment library for the Australian alpine specialist, the chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis), an atypical grasshopper known for its remarkable temperature-controlled colour change. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 20 and observed heterozygosity from 0.16 to 0.76. These are the first microsatellite markers for a non-endangered Australian alpine animal and will inform questions of gene flow across the sky islands of this unique and threatened region. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Development of New Microsatellite Markers for Salvia officinalis L. and Its Potential Use in Conservation-Genetic Studies of Narrow Endemic Salvia brachyodon Vandas
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 12082-12093; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130912082 - 24 Sep 2012
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 3318
Abstract
Nine new microsatellite markers (SSR) were isolated from Salvia officinalis L. A total of 125 alleles, with 8 to 21 alleles per locus, were detected in a natural population from the east Adriatic coast. The observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, and polymorphic information content [...] Read more.
Nine new microsatellite markers (SSR) were isolated from Salvia officinalis L. A total of 125 alleles, with 8 to 21 alleles per locus, were detected in a natural population from the east Adriatic coast. The observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, and polymorphic information content ranged from 0.46 to 0.83, 0.73 to 0.93 and 0.70 to 0.92, respectively. New microsatellite markers, as well as previously published markers, were tested for cross-amplification in Salvia brachyodon Vandas, a narrow endemic species known to be present in only two localities on the Balkan Peninsula. Out of 30 microsatellite markers tested on the natural S. brachyodon population, 15 were successfully amplified. To obtain evidence of recent bottleneck events in the populations of both species, observed genetic diversity (HE) was compared to the expected genetic diversity at mutation-drift equilibrium (HEQ) and calculated from the observed number of alleles using a two-phased mutation model (TPM). Recent bottleneck events were detected only in the S. brachyodon population. This result suggests the need to reconsider the current threat category of this endemic species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry)
Open AccessArticle
Several Lipid-Related Gene Polymorphisms Interact with Overweight/Obesity to Modulate Blood Pressure Levels
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 12062-12081; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130912062 - 24 Sep 2012
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3488
Abstract
Little is known about the interactions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overweight/obesity on blood pressure levels. The present study was undertaken to detect 10 lipid-related gene SNPs and their interactions with overweight/obesity on blood pressure levels. Genotyping of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 [...] Read more.
Little is known about the interactions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overweight/obesity on blood pressure levels. The present study was undertaken to detect 10 lipid-related gene SNPs and their interactions with overweight/obesity on blood pressure levels. Genotyping of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA-1) V825I, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) rs1044925, low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) AvaII hepatic lipase gene (LIPC) −250G > A, endothelial lipase gene (LIPG) 584C > T, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C > T, the E3 ubiquitin ligase myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein (MYLIP) rs3757354, proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9 (PCSK9) E670G, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) +294T > C, and Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SCARB1) rs5888 was performed in 978 normal weight and 751 overweight/obese subjects. The interactions were detected by factorial regression analysis. The genotypes of ACAT-1 AC, LIPC GA and AA, and SCARB1 TT; LDL-R A-A- and LIPC GA; and SCARB1 TT were interacted with overweight/obesity to increase systolic, diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) and pulse pressure (PP) levels; respectively. The genotypes of ACAT-1 CC; ACAT-1 AA and CC were interacted with overweight/obesity to decrease SBP, PP levels (p < 0.01–0.001); respectively. The differences in blood pressure levels between normal weight and overweight/obese subjects might partly result from different interactions of several SNPs and overweight/obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry)
Open AccessArticle
Genetic Diversity Characterization of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Isolates in Romania, Based on Phylogenetic Analysis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 12046-12061; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130912046 - 21 Sep 2012
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2852
Abstract
Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a disease produced by the (PRRS) virus, characterized by endemic evolution in the majority of countries, which remains in actuality being a permanent threat to health and economic free farms, as well as for those infected. [...] Read more.
Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a disease produced by the (PRRS) virus, characterized by endemic evolution in the majority of countries, which remains in actuality being a permanent threat to health and economic free farms, as well as for those infected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity of Romanian PRRSV isolates from the four most important pig farms in Romania by comparing the nucleotide sequences obtained for ORF5 and ORF7 with a wide range of sequences from GenBank belonging to the main types of PRRSV; the type 1. Eighteen different sequences were obtained for ORF5 gene and 10 for ORF7 gene. One Romanian isolate (Rom3) was found in three of the four different investigated farms. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Romanian PRRSV nucleotide sequences clustered in three groups within the subtype 1 of the virus. The analysis of amino acid sequences evidenced for GP5 and N-nucleocapsid proteins confirmed that the Romanian virus belonged to type 1. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry)
Open AccessArticle
A Computational Study of Calcium(II) and Copper(II) Ion Binding to the Hyaluronate Molecule
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 12036-12045; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130912036 - 20 Sep 2012
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2485
Abstract
The hyaluronate molecule is a negatively charged polysaccharide that performs a plethora of physiological functions in many cell tissues depending on its conformation. In the present paper, molecular modeling at three levels of theory and two basis sets was used to gain a [...] Read more.
The hyaluronate molecule is a negatively charged polysaccharide that performs a plethora of physiological functions in many cell tissues depending on its conformation. In the present paper, molecular modeling at three levels of theory and two basis sets was used to gain a deeper insight in the complex molecular structure of calcium(II) and copper(II) hyaluronate. Simulation results were compared with the experimental data (EXAFS or X-ray). It was found that B3LYP does not properly reproduce the experimental data while the HF and M06 methods do. Simulation data confirm that the N-acetyl group of the N-acetylglucosamine residue does not participate in the coordination bonding to the calcium(II) or copper(II) ion, as evident from the experimental data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Physical Chemistry, Theoretical and Computational Chemistry)
Open AccessReview
Inhibition of GTRAP3-18 May Increase Neuroprotective Glutathione (GSH) Synthesis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 12017-12035; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130912017 - 20 Sep 2012
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 3534
Abstract
Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide consisting of glutamate, cysteine, and glycine; it has a variety of functions in the central nervous system. Brain GSH depletion is considered a preclinical sign in age-related neurodegenerative diseases, and it promotes the subsequent processes toward neurotoxicity. A [...] Read more.
Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide consisting of glutamate, cysteine, and glycine; it has a variety of functions in the central nervous system. Brain GSH depletion is considered a preclinical sign in age-related neurodegenerative diseases, and it promotes the subsequent processes toward neurotoxicity. A neuroprotective mechanism accomplished by increasing GSH synthesis could be a promising approach in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In neurons, cysteine is the rate-limiting substrate for GSH synthesis. Excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1) is a neuronal cysteine/glutamate transporter in the brain. EAAC1 translocation to the plasma membrane promotes cysteine uptake, leading to GSH synthesis, while being negatively regulated by glutamate transport associated protein 3-18 (GTRAP3-18). Our recent studies have suggested GTRAP3-18 as an inhibitory factor for neuronal GSH synthesis. Inhibiting GTRAP3-18 function is an endogenous mechanism to increase neuron-specific GSH synthesis in the brain. This review gives an overview of EAAC1-mediated GSH synthesis, and its regulatory mechanisms by GTRAP3-18 in the brain, and a potential approach against neurodegeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry)
Open AccessArticle
Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Antibodies Overcome Resistance of Ovarian Cancer Cells to Targeted Therapy and Natural Cytotoxicity
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 12000-12016; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130912000 - 20 Sep 2012
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3651
Abstract
The poor outcome of advanced ovarian cancer under conventional therapy stimulated the exploration of new strategies to improve therapeutic efficacy. In our preclinical in vitro study we investigated a combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Combination treatment with the anti-EGFR-antibody Cetuximab, related tyrosine [...] Read more.
The poor outcome of advanced ovarian cancer under conventional therapy stimulated the exploration of new strategies to improve therapeutic efficacy. In our preclinical in vitro study we investigated a combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Combination treatment with the anti-EGFR-antibody Cetuximab, related tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and cytolytic NK cells was tested against different ovarian cancer cell lines and primary tumour cells cultured from patient ascites. We found that selected ovarian cancer cells were susceptible to cetuximab and anti-EGFR-TKI-treatment, while the majority of cell lines were resistant to single or combination treatment with both substances. In addition, most ovarian cancer cells displayed low susceptibility to natural cytotoxicity of unstimulated NK cells. Notably, NK cytotoxicity against resistant ovarian cancer cells could be effectively enhanced by addition of Cetuximab mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Neither natural cytotoxicity nor ADCC of NK cells were negatively affected by the presence of TKIs. ADCC could be further increased when NK cells were pre-stimulated with monocytes and the immunostimulatory mycobacterial protein PstS-1. Our data suggest that targeted antibody therapy could be beneficial even against resistant tumour cells by augmenting supplementary cytolytic NK functions. Future studies should evaluate the combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapeutic approaches in patients with advanced ovarian cancer being resistant to standard treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Molecular Oncology (special issue))
Open AccessReview
Common Fragile Sites: Genomic Hotspots of DNA Damage and Carcinogenesis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11974-11999; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911974 - 20 Sep 2012
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 3614
Abstract
Genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer, occurs preferentially at specific genomic regions known as common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are evolutionarily conserved and late replicating regions with AT-rich sequences, and CFS instability is correlated with cancer. In the last decade, much progress has [...] Read more.
Genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer, occurs preferentially at specific genomic regions known as common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are evolutionarily conserved and late replicating regions with AT-rich sequences, and CFS instability is correlated with cancer. In the last decade, much progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of chromosomal instability at CFSs. However, despite tremendous efforts, identifying a cancer-associated CFS gene (CACG) remains a challenge and little is known about the function of CACGs at most CFS loci. Recent studies of FATS (for Fragile-site Associated Tumor Suppressor), a new CACG at FRA10F, reveal an active role of this CACG in regulating DNA damage checkpoints and suppressing tumorigenesis. The identification of FATS may inspire more discoveries of other uncharacterized CACGs. Further elucidation of the biological functions and clinical significance of CACGs may be exploited for cancer biomarkers and therapeutic benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DNA Damage and Repair in Degenerative Diseases)
Open AccessReview
The Emerging Roles of ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Enzymes in Nucleotide Excision Repair
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11954-11973; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911954 - 20 Sep 2012
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 3157
Abstract
DNA repair in eukaryotic cells takes place in the context of chromatin, where DNA, including damaged DNA, is tightly packed into nucleosomes and higher order chromatin structures. Chromatin intrinsically restricts accessibility of DNA repair proteins to the damaged DNA and impacts upon the [...] Read more.
DNA repair in eukaryotic cells takes place in the context of chromatin, where DNA, including damaged DNA, is tightly packed into nucleosomes and higher order chromatin structures. Chromatin intrinsically restricts accessibility of DNA repair proteins to the damaged DNA and impacts upon the overall rate of DNA repair. Chromatin is highly responsive to DNA damage and undergoes specific remodeling to facilitate DNA repair. How damaged DNA is accessed, repaired and restored to the original chromatin state, and how chromatin remodeling coordinates these processes in vivo, remains largely unknown. ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers (ACRs) are the master regulators of chromatin structure and dynamics. Conserved from yeast to humans, ACRs utilize the energy of ATP to reorganize packing of chromatin and control DNA accessibility by sliding, ejecting or restructuring nucleosomes. Several studies have demonstrated that ATP-dependent remodeling activity of ACRs plays important roles in coordination of spatio-temporal steps of different DNA repair pathways in chromatin. This review focuses on the role of ACRs in regulation of various aspects of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in the context of chromatin. We discuss current understanding of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by various subfamilies of remodelers and regulation of the NER pathway in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Excising DNA Damage from Chromosomes: Entry Visas and Exit Strategies)
Open AccessArticle
Room Temperature Radiolytic Synthesized [email protected]2-Al2O3 Nanoparticles
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11941-11953; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911941 - 20 Sep 2012
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4234
Abstract
Colloidal [email protected]2-Al2O3 bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared by a gamma irradiation method in an aqueous system in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and isopropanol respectively as a colloidal stabilizer and scavenger of hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals. The gamma [...] Read more.
Colloidal [email protected]2-Al2O3 bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared by a gamma irradiation method in an aqueous system in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and isopropanol respectively as a colloidal stabilizer and scavenger of hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals. The gamma irradiation was carried out in a 60Co gamma source chamber with different doses up to 120 kGy. The formation of [email protected]2-Al2O3 nanoparticles was observed initially by the change in color of the colloidal samples from colorless to brown. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the presence of bonds between polymer chains and the metal surface at all radiation doses. Results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that [email protected]2-Al2O3 nanoparticles are in a core-shell structure. By controlling the absorbed dose and precursor concentration, nanoclusters with different particle sizes were obtained. The average particle diameter increased with increased precursor concentration and decreased with increased dose. This is due to the competition between nucleation, growth, and aggregation processes in the formation of nanoclusters during irradiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Materials Science)
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Open AccessArticle
A Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Inhibits Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Apoptosis in Rat Cardiomyocytes via the Mitochondrial Pathway
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11923-11940; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911923 - 20 Sep 2012
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 3464
Abstract
Severe myocardial dysfunction and tissue damage resulting from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a common clinical scenario in patients with certain types of heart diseases and therapies such as thrombolysis, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, and cardiac transplantation. The underlining mechanism of endogenous [...] Read more.
Severe myocardial dysfunction and tissue damage resulting from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a common clinical scenario in patients with certain types of heart diseases and therapies such as thrombolysis, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, and cardiac transplantation. The underlining mechanism of endogenous cardiac protection after I/R injury has been a focus of current research. Growing evidences suggests that soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) has a cardioprotective effect; however, its role in I/R injury remains unclear. We hypothesized that exogenous administration of sRAGE during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) induces cardioprotection by inhibiting cardiomyocyte apoptosis via multiple signals, involving mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), mitochondrial cytochrome c, caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes underwent hypoxia for 3-h followed by 2-h reoxygenation or were treated with sRAGE for 10 min before H/R. Compared with H/R alone, sRAGE pretreatment reduced H/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis from 27.9% ± 5.9% to 9.4% ± 0.7% (p < 0.05). In addition, sRAGE treatment significantly inhibited H/R-induced mitochondrial depolarization and mPTP opening, reduced mitochondrial cytochrome c leakage, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity, and decreased the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2. Therefore, we conclude that the exogenous administration of sRAGE during H/R is involved in cardioprotection by inhibiting apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, which, if further confirmed in vivo, may have important clinical implications during H/R. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Programmed Cell Death and Apoptosis)
Open AccessArticle
Ethyl Gallate Induces Apoptosis of HL-60 Cells by Promoting the Expression of Caspases-8, -9, -3, Apoptosis-Inducing Factor and Endonuclease G
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11912-11922; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911912 - 20 Sep 2012
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3468
Abstract
Many phytochemicals have been recognized to have potential therapeutic efficacy in cancer treatment. In this study, we investigated ethyl gallate (EG) for possible proapoptotic effects in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60. We examined cell viability, morphological changes, DNA content and fragmentation, [...] Read more.
Many phytochemicals have been recognized to have potential therapeutic efficacy in cancer treatment. In this study, we investigated ethyl gallate (EG) for possible proapoptotic effects in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60. We examined cell viability, morphological changes, DNA content and fragmentation, and expression of apoptosis-related proteins for up to 48 h after EG treatment. The results showed that EG induced morphological changes and DNA fragmentation and reduced HL-60 cell viability in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Western blotting analysis indicated that EG-mediated HL-60 apoptosis mainly occurred through the mitochondrial pathway, as shown by the release of cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and endonuclease G (Endo G), as well as the upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax). EG also activated the death receptor-dependent pathway of apoptosis by enhancing the expression of caspases-8, -9, and -3 and the Bcl-2 interacting domain (Bid). Collectively, our results showed that EG induces apoptosis in HL-60 via mitochondrial-mediated pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Derived Pharmaceuticals by Molecular Farming 2012)
Open AccessReview
Chromatin Dynamics during Nucleotide Excision Repair: Histones on the Move
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11895-11911; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911895 - 19 Sep 2012
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3293
Abstract
It has been a long-standing question how DNA damage repair proceeds in a nuclear environment where DNA is packaged into chromatin. Several decades of analysis combining in vitro and in vivo studies in various model organisms ranging from yeast to human have markedly [...] Read more.
It has been a long-standing question how DNA damage repair proceeds in a nuclear environment where DNA is packaged into chromatin. Several decades of analysis combining in vitro and in vivo studies in various model organisms ranging from yeast to human have markedly increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chromatin disorganization upon damage detection and re-assembly after repair. Here, we review the methods that have been developed over the years to delineate chromatin alterations in response to DNA damage by focusing on the well-characterized Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) pathway. We also highlight how these methods have provided key mechanistic insight into histone dynamics coupled to repair in mammals, raising new issues about the maintenance of chromatin integrity. In particular, we discuss how NER factors and central players in chromatin dynamics such as histone modifiers, nucleosome remodeling factors, and histone chaperones function to mobilize histones during repair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Excising DNA Damage from Chromosomes: Entry Visas and Exit Strategies)
Open AccessArticle
Encapsulation-Induced Stress Helps Saccharomyces cerevisiae Resist Convertible Lignocellulose Derived Inhibitors
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11881-11894; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911881 - 19 Sep 2012
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3347
Abstract
The ability of macroencapsulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae CBS8066 to withstand readily and not readily in situ convertible lignocellulose-derived inhibitors was investigated in anaerobic batch cultivations. It was shown that encapsulation increased the tolerance against readily convertible furan aldehyde inhibitors and to dilute acid spruce [...] Read more.
The ability of macroencapsulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae CBS8066 to withstand readily and not readily in situ convertible lignocellulose-derived inhibitors was investigated in anaerobic batch cultivations. It was shown that encapsulation increased the tolerance against readily convertible furan aldehyde inhibitors and to dilute acid spruce hydrolysate, but not to organic acid inhibitors that cannot be metabolized anaerobically. Gene expression analysis showed that the protective effect arising from the encapsulation is evident also on the transcriptome level, as the expression of the stress-related genes YAP1, ATR1 and FLR1 was induced upon encapsulation. The transcript levels were increased due to encapsulation already in the medium without added inhibitors, indicating that the cells sensed low stress level arising from the encapsulation itself. We present a model, where the stress response is induced by nutrient limitation, that this helps the cells to cope with the increased stress added by a toxic medium, and that superficial cells in the capsules degrade convertible inhibitors, alleviating the inhibition for the cells deeper in the capsule. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Polystyrene Attached Pt(IV)–Azomethine, Synthesis and Immobilization of Glucose Oxidase Enzyme
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11870-11880; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911870 - 19 Sep 2012
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2899
Abstract
Modified polystyrene with Pt(IV)–azomethine (APS–Sch–Pt) was synthesized by means of condensation and demonstrated to be a promising enzyme support by studying the enzymatic properties of glucose oxidase enzyme (GOx) immobilized on it. The characteristics of the immobilized glucose oxidase (APS–Sch–Pt–GOx) enzyme showed two [...] Read more.
Modified polystyrene with Pt(IV)–azomethine (APS–Sch–Pt) was synthesized by means of condensation and demonstrated to be a promising enzyme support by studying the enzymatic properties of glucose oxidase enzyme (GOx) immobilized on it. The characteristics of the immobilized glucose oxidase (APS–Sch–Pt–GOx) enzyme showed two optimum pH values that were pH = 4.0 and pH = 7. The insertion of stable Pt(IV)–azomethine spacers between the polystyrene backbone and the immobilized GOx, (APS–Sch–Pt–GOx), increases the enzymes’ activity and improves their affinity towards the substrate even at pH = 4. The influence of temperature, reusability and storage capacity on the free and immobilized glucose oxidase enzyme was investigated. The storage stability of the immobilized glucose oxidase was shown to be eleven months in dry conditions at +4 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme Optimization and Immobilization)
Open AccessArticle
Microsatellite Loci in the Gypsophyte Lepidium subulatum (Brassicaceae), and Transferability to Other Lepidieae
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11861-11869; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911861 - 19 Sep 2012
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2732
Abstract
Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the Ibero-North African, strict gypsophyte Lepidium subulatum to unravel the effects of habitat fragmentation in levels of genetic diversity, genetic structure and gene flow among its populations. Using 454 pyrosequencing 12 microsatellite loci including di- and tri-nucleotide [...] Read more.
Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the Ibero-North African, strict gypsophyte Lepidium subulatum to unravel the effects of habitat fragmentation in levels of genetic diversity, genetic structure and gene flow among its populations. Using 454 pyrosequencing 12 microsatellite loci including di- and tri-nucleotide repeats were characterized in L. subulatum. They amplified a total of 80 alleles (2–12 alleles per locus) in a sample of 35 individuals of L. subulatum, showing relatively high levels of genetic diversity, HO = 0.645, HE = 0.627. Cross-species transferability of all 12 loci was successful for the Iberian endemics Lepidium cardamines, Lepidium stylatum, and the widespread, Lepidium graminifolium and one species each of two related genera, Cardaria draba and Coronopus didymus. These microsatellite primers will be useful to investigate genetic diversity, population structure and to address conservation genetics in species of Lepidium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry)
Open AccessReview
The Heterochromatic Barrier to DNA Double Strand Break Repair: How to Get the Entry Visa
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11844-11860; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911844 - 19 Sep 2012
Cited by 61 | Viewed by 3524
Abstract
Over recent decades, a deep understanding of pathways that repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB) has been gained from biochemical, structural, biophysical and cellular studies. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) represent the two major DSB repair pathways, and both processes [...] Read more.
Over recent decades, a deep understanding of pathways that repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB) has been gained from biochemical, structural, biophysical and cellular studies. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) represent the two major DSB repair pathways, and both processes are now well understood. Recent work has demonstrated that the chromatin environment at a DSB significantly impacts upon DSB repair and that, moreover, dramatic modifications arise in the chromatin surrounding a DSB. Chromatin is broadly divided into open, transcriptionally active, euchromatin (EC) and highly compacted, transcriptionally inert, heterochromatin (HC), although these represent extremes of a spectrum. The HC superstructure restricts both DSB repair and damage response signaling. Moreover, DSBs within HC (HC-DSBs) are rapidly relocalized to the EC-HC interface. The damage response protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), is required for HC-DSB repair but is dispensable for the relocalization of HC-DSBs. It has been proposed that ATM signaling enhances HC relaxation in the DSB vicinity and that this is a prerequisite for HC-DSB repair. Hence, ATM is essential for repair of HC-DSBs. Here, we discuss how HC impacts upon the response to DSBs and how ATM overcomes the barrier that HC poses to repair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Excising DNA Damage from Chromosomes: Entry Visas and Exit Strategies)
Open AccessArticle
Studies on the Interactions of Copper and Zinc Ions with β-Amyloid Peptides by a Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11832-11843; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911832 - 19 Sep 2012
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2850
Abstract
The aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) into fibrils plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Metal ions including copper and zinc are closely connected to the precipitation and toxicity of Aβ. In this study, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) [...] Read more.
The aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) into fibrils plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Metal ions including copper and zinc are closely connected to the precipitation and toxicity of Aβ. In this study, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was constructed to investigate the interactions between Aβ and metal ions. Aβ peptide was immobilized on the SPR chip surface through a preformed alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Our observations indicate that the immobilized Aβ undergoes a conformational change upon exposure to the metal ions. A difference in metal binding affinity between Aβ1–28 and Aβ1–42 was also detected. The results suggest that SPR is an effective method to characterize the interactions between Aβ and metal ions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Recognition)
Open AccessReview
Modification by Ubiquitin-Like Proteins: Significance in Apoptosis and Autophagy Pathways
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11804-11831; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911804 - 19 Sep 2012
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 3445
Abstract
Ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls) confer diverse functions on their target proteins. The modified proteins are involved in various biological processes, including DNA replication, signal transduction, cell cycle control, embryogenesis, cytoskeletal regulation, metabolism, stress response, homeostasis and mRNA processing. Modifiers such as SUMO, ATG12, ISG15, [...] Read more.
Ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls) confer diverse functions on their target proteins. The modified proteins are involved in various biological processes, including DNA replication, signal transduction, cell cycle control, embryogenesis, cytoskeletal regulation, metabolism, stress response, homeostasis and mRNA processing. Modifiers such as SUMO, ATG12, ISG15, FAT10, URM1, and UFM have been shown to modify proteins thus conferring functions related to programmed cell death, autophagy and regulation of the immune system. Putative modifiers such as Domain With No Name (DWNN) have been identified in recent times but not fully characterized. In this review, we focus on cellular processes involving human Ubls and their targets. We review current progress in targeting these modifiers for drug design strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry)
Open AccessReview
Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage in Multiple Sclerosis and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Therapeutic Modulation via Fumaric Acid Esters
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11783-11803; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911783 - 18 Sep 2012
Cited by 73 | Viewed by 4822
Abstract
Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in many neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s as well as Huntington’s disease. Inflammation and oxidative stress are also thought to promote tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent data point at [...] Read more.
Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in many neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s as well as Huntington’s disease. Inflammation and oxidative stress are also thought to promote tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent data point at an important role of anti-oxidative pathways for tissue protection in chronic-progressive MS, particularly involving the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Thus, novel therapeutics enhancing cellular resistance to free radicals could prove useful for MS treatment. Here, fumaric acid esters (FAE) are a new, orally available treatment option which had already been tested in phase II/III MS trials demonstrating beneficial effects on relapse rates and magnetic resonance imaging markers. In vitro, application of dimethylfumarate (DMF) leads to stabilization of Nrf2, activation of Nrf2-dependent transcriptional activity and abundant synthesis of detoxifying proteins. Furthermore, application of FAE involves direct modification of the inhibitor of Nrf2, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1. On cellular levels, the application of FAE enhances neuronal survival and protects astrocytes against oxidative stress. Increased levels of Nrf2 are detected in the central nervous system of DMF treated mice suffering from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. In EAE, DMF ameliorates the disease course and improves preservation of myelin, axons and neurons. Finally, Nrf2 is also up-regulated in the spinal cord of autopsy specimens from untreated patients with MS, probably as part of a naturally occurring anti-oxidative response. In summary, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative pathways are important players in MS pathophysiology and constitute a promising target for future MS therapies like FAE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuroprotective Strategies 2012)
Open AccessArticle
Protective Effect of Anthocyanin from Lonicera Caerulea var. Edulis on Radiation-Induced Damage in Mice
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11773-11782; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911773 - 18 Sep 2012
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 2939
Abstract
The radioprotective effect of anthocyanin extracted from Lonicera caerulea var. edulis (ALC), was studied in ICR mice. Different doses of ALC were intragastrically administered to mice once a day, prior to radiation. After two weeks, the mice received a one-time 5 Gy whole [...] Read more.
The radioprotective effect of anthocyanin extracted from Lonicera caerulea var. edulis (ALC), was studied in ICR mice. Different doses of ALC were intragastrically administered to mice once a day, prior to radiation. After two weeks, the mice received a one-time 5 Gy whole body 60Coγ radiation. The spleen index, thymus index, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and glutathione (GSH) content in liver tissue were measured. Compared with the radiation control group, the levels of MDA in all ALC treated groups decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Moreover, the GSH content, activities of SOD and GSH-Px in liver tissue were enhanced significantly (p < 0.05) in all ALC groups. These results demonstrate that ALC may be a potential radioprotector, and a further study of the molecular mechanism is needed for further application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry)
Open AccessReview
Neuroprotection for Stroke: Current Status and Future Perspectives
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11753-11772; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911753 - 18 Sep 2012
Cited by 102 | Viewed by 5704
Abstract
Neuroprotection aims to prevent salvageable neurons from dying. Despite showing efficacy in experimental stroke studies, the concept of neuroprotection has failed in clinical trials. Reasons for the translational difficulties include a lack of methodological agreement between preclinical and clinical studies and the heterogeneity [...] Read more.
Neuroprotection aims to prevent salvageable neurons from dying. Despite showing efficacy in experimental stroke studies, the concept of neuroprotection has failed in clinical trials. Reasons for the translational difficulties include a lack of methodological agreement between preclinical and clinical studies and the heterogeneity of stroke in humans compared to homogeneous strokes in animal models. Even when the international recommendations for preclinical stroke research, the Stroke Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) criteria, were followed, we have still seen limited success in the clinic, examples being NXY-059 and haematopoietic growth factors which fulfilled nearly all the STAIR criteria. However, there are a number of neuroprotective treatments under investigation in clinical trials such as hypothermia and ebselen. Moreover, promising neuroprotective treatments based on a deeper understanding of the complex pathophysiology of ischemic stroke such as inhibitors of NADPH oxidases and PSD-95 are currently evaluated in preclinical studies. Further concepts to improve translation include the investigation of neuroprotectants in multicenter preclinical Phase III-type studies, improved animal models, and close alignment between clinical trial and preclinical methodologies. Future successful translation will require both new concepts for preclinical testing and innovative approaches based on mechanistic insights into the ischemic cascade. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuroprotective Strategies 2012)
Open AccessReview
Environmental Risk Factors for Multiple Sclerosis: A Review with a Focus on Molecular Mechanisms
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11718-11752; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911718 - 18 Sep 2012
Cited by 75 | Viewed by 5233
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disabling disease of the central nervous system commonly affecting young adults. Pathologically, there are patches of inflammation (plaques) with demyelination of axons and oligodendrocyte loss. There is a global latitude gradient in MS prevalence, and incidence of [...] Read more.
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disabling disease of the central nervous system commonly affecting young adults. Pathologically, there are patches of inflammation (plaques) with demyelination of axons and oligodendrocyte loss. There is a global latitude gradient in MS prevalence, and incidence of MS is increasing (particularly in females). These changes suggest a major role for environmental factors in causation of disease. We have reviewed the evidence and potential mechanisms of action for three exposures: vitamin D, Epstein Barr virus and cigarette smoking. Recent advances supporting gene-environment interactions are reviewed. Further research is needed to establish mechanisms of causality in humans and to explore preventative strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in the Research of Multiple Sclerosis)
Open AccessReview
Mechanisms of Ovarian Cancer Metastasis: Biochemical Pathways
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11705-11717; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911705 - 18 Sep 2012
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 3668
Abstract
Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Despite advances in chemotherapy, the five-year survival rate of advanced ovarian cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis remains around 30%. The most significant prognostic factor is stage, and most patients present at an advanced stage with [...] Read more.
Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Despite advances in chemotherapy, the five-year survival rate of advanced ovarian cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis remains around 30%. The most significant prognostic factor is stage, and most patients present at an advanced stage with peritoneal dissemination. There is often no clearly identifiable precursor lesion; therefore, the events leading to metastatic disease are poorly understood. This article reviews metastatic suppressor genes, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and the tumor microenvironment as they relate to ovarian cancer metastasis. Additionally, novel chemotherapeutic agents targeting the metastasis-related biochemical pathways are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Molecules in Ovarian Cancer 2012)
Open AccessArticle
High Yield of Wax Ester Synthesized from Cetyl Alcohol and Octanoic Acid by Lipozyme RMIM and Novozym 435
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11694-11704; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911694 - 17 Sep 2012
Cited by 31 | Viewed by 4081
Abstract
Wax esters are long-chain esters that have been widely applied in premium lubricants, parting agents, antifoaming agents and cosmetics. In this study, the biocatalytic preparation of a specific wax ester, cetyl octanoate, is performed in n-hexane using two commercial immobilized lipases, i.e. [...] Read more.
Wax esters are long-chain esters that have been widely applied in premium lubricants, parting agents, antifoaming agents and cosmetics. In this study, the biocatalytic preparation of a specific wax ester, cetyl octanoate, is performed in n-hexane using two commercial immobilized lipases, i.e., Lipozyme® RMIM (Rhizomucor miehei) and Novozym® 435 (Candida antarctica). Response surface methodology (RSM) and 5-level-4-factor central composite rotatable design (CCRD) are employed to evaluate the effects of reaction time (1–5 h), reaction temperature (45–65 °C), substrate molar ratio (1–3:1), and enzyme amount (10%–50%) on the yield of cetyl octanoate. Using RSM to optimize the reaction, the maximum yields reached 94% and 98% using Lipozyme® RMIM and Novozym® 435, respectively. The optimum conditions for synthesis of cetyl octanoate by both lipases are established and compared. Novozym® 435 proves to be a more efficient biocatalyst than Lipozyme® RMIM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme Optimization and Immobilization)
Open AccessArticle
Cellular Delivery of Doxorubicin via pH-Controlled Hydrazone Linkage Using Multifunctional Nano Vehicle Based on Poly(β-L-Malic Acid)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(9), 11681-11693; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911681 - 17 Sep 2012
Cited by 53 | Viewed by 7025
Abstract
Doxorubicin (DOX) is currently used in cancer chemotherapy to treat many tumors and shows improved delivery, reduced toxicity and higher treatment efficacy when being part of nanoscale delivery systems. However, a major drawback remains its toxicity to healthy tissue and the development of [...] Read more.
Doxorubicin (DOX) is currently used in cancer chemotherapy to treat many tumors and shows improved delivery, reduced toxicity and higher treatment efficacy when being part of nanoscale delivery systems. However, a major drawback remains its toxicity to healthy tissue and the development of multi-drug resistance during prolonged treatment. This is why in our work we aimed to improve DOX delivery and reduce the toxicity by chemical conjugation with a new nanoplatform based on polymalic acid. For delivery into recipient cancer cells, DOX was conjugated via pH-sensitive hydrazone linkage along with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to a biodegradable, non-toxic and non-immunogenic nanoconjugate platform: poly(β-L-malic acid) (PMLA). DOX-nanoconjugates were found stable under physiological conditions and shown to successfully inhibit in vitro cancer cell growth of several invasive breast carcinoma cell lines such as MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB- 468 and of primary glioma cell lines such as U87MG and U251. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Nanoparticles 2012)
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