Topic Editors

School of Environment and Resource, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, China
School of Resources and Safety Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China
Department of Urban Planning, Engineering Networks and Systems, Institute of Archi-tecture and Construction, South Ural State University, 76 Lenin Prospect, Chelyabinsk 454080, Russia
School of Resources, Environment and Materials, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China
Dr. Wei Pan
School of Resources and Safety Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China

Exploring the Mine Environment, Safety Risk and Occupational Health

Abstract submission deadline
closed (31 March 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (30 June 2024)
Viewed by
17243

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mineral resources play an important role in supporting world economic and social development. However, mining activity, especially in relation to underground mining, is considered to be one of the causes of the most accidents, fatalities, and diseases in the world. Every year, thousands of miners die in mining operations. There are several causes for the occurrence of accidents, including the release of toxic gases, collapses of mine openings, coaldust explosions, etc. In addition, mining activities also cause pollution to the surrounding environment, such as soil pollution, water pollution, air pollution, and so on. Mining can pollute the environment, which also poses a risk to human health. Therefore, in the process of mining, transportation, and storage, how to reduce the impact of mining activities on the surrounding environment and reduce the occurrence of accidents and occupational diseases is an urgent problem that needs to be solved. However, knowledge about the environmental, safety and health risks associated with mines is still limited. There is an immediate need to come up with good research methods and look into the above problems. This Special Issue aims to explore the latest developments on these issues and attempts to provide a comprehensive perspective. We invite researchers to contribute original research and articles as well as review articles in the scope of this Special Issue that introduce new technologies and solutions related to the field of mining health and safety. The topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Safety risk and occupational health in synergetic mining;
  • Safe production and smart mining;
  • Safe and sustainable mining technology;
  • Smart, green mining;
  • Mine safety monitoring;
  • Safety issues in sustainable mine construction;
  • New trends in safe mining;
  • Environmental exposure and occupational contact;
  • Mine safety and personnel health;
  • Ecological survey and restoration of mining areas;
  • Mine pollution remediation;
  • Probabilistic techniques in mining safety;
  • Mining safety and intelligent methodologies.

Dr. Chengyu Xie
Dr. Jian Zhou
Dr. Danial Jahed Armaghani
Prof. Dr. Qingfa Chen
Dr. Wei Pan
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • safety and health
  • pollution and the environment
  • synergetic mining
  • air pollution
  • health effects
  • public health
  • smart mining
  • monitoring
  • risk assessment
  • hazard assessment
  • occupational health
  • environmental health

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Energies
energies
3.0 6.2 2008 17.5 Days CHF 2600
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ijerph
- 7.3 2004 24.3 Days CHF 2500
Minerals
minerals
2.2 4.1 2011 18 Days CHF 2400
Mining
mining
- 2.8 2021 19.6 Days CHF 1000
Safety
safety
1.8 3.2 2015 27.3 Days CHF 1800

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Published Papers (11 papers)

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20 pages, 7601 KiB  
Article
Spatiotemporal Analysis of Total Suspended Solids in Water Bodies and Mapping Mining Areas in Suriname and French Guiana
by Breno Mello Pereira and Felipe de Lucia Lobo
Mining 2024, 4(3), 510-529; https://doi.org/10.3390/mining4030029 - 16 Jul 2024
Viewed by 250
Abstract
Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) has made several environmental impacts, resulting in the significant siltation of water bodies due to the deposition of sediments on riverbanks. Based on this perspective, this study aims to investigate the water bodies and regions most impacted [...] Read more.
Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) has made several environmental impacts, resulting in the significant siltation of water bodies due to the deposition of sediments on riverbanks. Based on this perspective, this study aims to investigate the water bodies and regions most impacted by mining activities, especially in relation to the increase in the Total Suspended Solids (TSS) caused by ASGM, focusing on the territories of Suriname and French Guiana, over the period from 2017 to 2023, through the creation of an algorithm in Google Earth Engine. This research also aims to map and describe active mining in this region using the Classification and Regression Tree (CART) method, which achieved an overall accuracy of 82% and a kappa index of 0.77. The results reveal that from 2017 to 2024, there was an increase of 148.09 km2 in mining, with an average increase in TSS of up to 167 mg/L in water bodies most affected by mining activities. Finally, the continued importance of using remote sensing technologies, such as GEE, together with innovative methodological approaches, to monitor and manage natural resources in a sustainable manner is highlighted. Full article
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29 pages, 1007 KiB  
Article
Unveiling the Nexus: Sulphur Dioxide Exposure, Proximity to Mining, and Respiratory Illnesses in Kankoyo: A Mixed-Methods Investigation
by Sipiwe Chihana, Jameson Mbale and Nchimunya Chaamwe
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(7), 850; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21070850 - 28 Jun 2024
Viewed by 577
Abstract
The emission of sulphur dioxide (SO 2) from mining activities presents significant health hazards, particularly to communities near industrial zones. This mixed-methods study investigates the nexus between (SO 2) exposure and respiratory health in Kankoyo Township, Zambia. Employing community [...] Read more.
The emission of sulphur dioxide (SO 2) from mining activities presents significant health hazards, particularly to communities near industrial zones. This mixed-methods study investigates the nexus between (SO 2) exposure and respiratory health in Kankoyo Township, Zambia. Employing community engagement, expert interviews, spatial analysis, and a retrospective examination of 15 years of health and (SO 2) data, the research identified a troubling correlation between (SO 2) exposure and adverse respiratory health effects among the local population. Expert interviews highlighted that respiratory issues constituted approximately 75% of health complications, with a notable reduction in asthma cases following the installation of a monitoring station and upgrades to smelter operations. Spatial analysis demonstrated that (SO 2) levels in Kankoyo exceeded the Zambian Environmental Management Agency (ZEMA) limits by 1713% identifying it as a significant pollution hotspot. Additionally, wind profile analysis indicated frequent low-speed winds from the east-northeast (ENE), contributing to pollutant accumulation. Based on these insights, the study recommends implementing real-time pollution data sharing, affordable air quality sensors, addressing medication shortages, establishing specialized respiratory clinics, launching IT-driven awareness campaigns, and further research into additional pollutants and confounding factors. Full article
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10 pages, 306 KiB  
Article
Arithmetic vs. Weighted Means in Fish Fillets Mercury Analyses
by Helvi Heinonen-Tanski
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(6), 758; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21060758 - 10 Jun 2024
Viewed by 564
Abstract
Mercury (Hg) analyses in species of fish are performed for two reasons: (1) to safeguard human health; and (2) to assess environmental quality, since different environmental changes may increase the Hg concentrations in fish. These analyses are important since both natural and human [...] Read more.
Mercury (Hg) analyses in species of fish are performed for two reasons: (1) to safeguard human health; and (2) to assess environmental quality, since different environmental changes may increase the Hg concentrations in fish. These analyses are important since both natural and human activities can increase these Hg concentrations, which can vary extensively, depending on the species, age and catching location. Hg-contaminated fish or other marine foodstuffs can be only detected by chemical analysis. If the aim of Hg analysis is to protect the health of marine food consumers, researcher workers must consider the location where the fish were caught and interpret the results accordingly. Health and environmental officials must appreciate that in specific places, local people may have a daily diet consisting entirely of fish or other marine foods, and these individuals should not be exposed to high concentrations of Hg. Regional and national health and environmental officials should follow the recent guidance of international organizations when drawing their final conclusions about whether the products are safe or unsafe to eat. Correct statistical calculations are not always carried out; so, too high Hg amounts could be presented, and fish eaters could be protected. This work has been conducted to show the differences in Hg concentrations between weighted (weighted with fish weights) and arithmetic means. Thus, the mean that is only weighted also includes the Hg content in fishes; so, the exposure to Hg can be evaluated. Full article
16 pages, 2897 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Impact of Quarrying as an Environmental Ethic Crisis: A Case Study of Limestone Mining in a Rural Community
by Babalwa Kafu-Quvane and Sanelisiwe Mlaba
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(4), 458; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21040458 - 9 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1857
Abstract
In this study, we investigated the impact of quarrying as an environmental ethical crisis. The need for the study arose when we realised the deteriorating effect of the quality of life in our community, which is located next to a limestone quarry. To [...] Read more.
In this study, we investigated the impact of quarrying as an environmental ethical crisis. The need for the study arose when we realised the deteriorating effect of the quality of life in our community, which is located next to a limestone quarry. To obtain a deeper understanding of the adverse impact on the environment and the quality of life of the people living in the community around the quarry, we explored the workers from the community, and the members of the community-based organisation’s (CBO) experiences. We employed a qualitative method research approach, using a single case study design. We adopted a utilitarian perspective and Pinchot’s conservation as ethical systems that determine morality based on the greatest good for the greatest number. Both provide a framework for analysing environmental problems and ethical crises associated with limestone quarrying. We generated data using face-to-face interviews and focus group discussions. We present and discuss data through the following themes: analysis of the social and cultural impacts on local communities and indigenous people, assessment of the ecological consequences on biodiversity and habitat destruction, and examination of the effects on water resources, air quality, and soil erosion. The results show that the negative effects of the quarry on the environment have always worried the local people. The company’s disrespect for the community and ignorance of the laws governing quarry activities is the root of the ethical dilemma. The detrimental effects that the operations have on human health and safety as well as the environment is the other ethical dilemma, which includes, land degradation, vibrations, air, and water pollution. Full article
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15 pages, 546 KiB  
Article
Enhancing Patient Safety in Spain: Streamlining Adverse Event Detection in Occupational Healthcare Records
by Diego Moya, Rafael Manzanera, Jordi Ortner, Marta Torres, Joan Carles Serfaty, Carme Sauri, Lourdes Jimenez and Jose Joaquin Mira
Safety 2024, 10(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety10010013 - 16 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1826
Abstract
Background: Given the lack of previous studies on adverse events (AEs) in the area of occupational healthcare in Spain, it is very important to begin to understand this phenomenon in order to act on it. The objective was to accurately quantify AE occurring [...] Read more.
Background: Given the lack of previous studies on adverse events (AEs) in the area of occupational healthcare in Spain, it is very important to begin to understand this phenomenon in order to act on it. The objective was to accurately quantify AE occurring in occupational healthcare in MC Mutual during May 2021. Methods: We conducted a review of a representative random sample of 250 clinical records to identify AEs through an active search audit, focused on the frequency, type, severity, and preventability of these events, categorized using standardized scales. Results: We detected seven AEs in the sample of clinical records, representing 3% AEs per clinical record, while in the APEAS Spanish Study, they were detected in 10% of patients. The most frequent AE type was postoperative, followed by medication and diagnostic delay. The AEs were of intermediate severity and high severity and with a variable degree of being preventable. Conclusions: The detection of AEs has been useful in the development of projects and action plans such as specific training courses, safety patient newsletters, ambulatory risk maps, and treatment plans framed in the official certification of patient safety. These results should be evaluated in other companies similar to MC Mutual. Full article
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13 pages, 2226 KiB  
Article
A Data-driven Framework to Reduce Diesel Spillages in Underground Mines
by Sheila R. Ngwaku, Janine Pascoe, Wiehan A. Pelser, Jan C. Vosloo and Jean H. van Laar
Mining 2023, 3(4), 683-695; https://doi.org/10.3390/mining3040037 - 3 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 846
Abstract
Several methodologies have been developed to manage diesel in open-cast mining due to its high demand and increasing diesel prices. Although the use of diesel-powered equipment in underground mines has increased over the years, effective management thereof has not received the same attention. [...] Read more.
Several methodologies have been developed to manage diesel in open-cast mining due to its high demand and increasing diesel prices. Although the use of diesel-powered equipment in underground mines has increased over the years, effective management thereof has not received the same attention. With the advent of Industry 4.0, data can be utilised more effectively by modern businesses to identify and solve problems in a structured manner. In this study, an underground mine was used as a case study to determine whether a Data, Information, Knowledge, Wisdom (DIKW) method for diesel management could be coupled with the Six Sigma Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, Control (DMAIC) tool to make more informed decisions and gain new insights to help reduce diesel wastage underground. The new integrated methodology identified diesel spillages and highlighted the biggest contributors to these underground spillages. The Six Sigma DMAIC domain utilised root cause analysis to determine the reason for recent systems failures, followed by the identification of practical solutions to eliminate up to 200 ML (megalitres) of diesel spillage. With this information, the case study mine stands to save over USD 175,000 per annum. Full article
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17 pages, 2360 KiB  
Article
Pore Structure Alteration of Shale with Exposure to Different Fluids: The Longmaxi Formation Shale in the Sichuan Basin, China
by Shuwen Zhang, Ziyi Shen, Yan He, Zhonghua Zhu, Qingguo Ren and Liang Zhang
Minerals 2023, 13(11), 1387; https://doi.org/10.3390/min13111387 - 30 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1107
Abstract
The interaction between shale and various fluids is crucial as it modifies pore structures, which govern the effective development of shale gas and the geological storage of carbon dioxide in shale formations. In this study, samples from the Longmaxi Formation shale in Sichuan [...] Read more.
The interaction between shale and various fluids is crucial as it modifies pore structures, which govern the effective development of shale gas and the geological storage of carbon dioxide in shale formations. In this study, samples from the Longmaxi Formation shale in Sichuan Basin of China were exposed to different fluids, including 6 MPa CO2, 12 MPa CO2, 6 MPa CO2+brine, and 12 MPa CO2+brine, at 45 °C for 100 days. Various methods, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and the low-pressure gas adsorption (N2) test, were adopted to evaluate chemical and structural changes during the exposure process. After being treated with supercritical CO2+brine and subcritical CO2+brine, the shale underwent significant changes in its major element composition. The content of Ca, Al, and K in shale saturated with supercritical CO2+brine decreased from 13.00% to 10.34%, from 3.65% to 3.36%, and from 1.56% to 1.37%, respectively. Meanwhile, the content of Si and Na in the same shale increased slightly after saturation. The amount of quartz and dolomite increased, while the levels of clay and calcite slightly decreased. The surface of the shale sample became rougher and small bumps and cracks appeared after saturation with different fluids, as shown by the FESEM analysis results. Furthermore, the changes in both the total pore volume and pore size followed a similar pattern to the alterations in the specific surface areas. The highest level of variation occurred with the shale that was saturated with 12 MPa of CO2, indicating that gas pressure and CO2 phase state have a significant influence on the shale’s pore structure. In addition, the distribution of pore sizes showed a bias towards larger sizes across all diameters; this suggests that the reaction resulted in a decrease in the number of micropores. This also highlights that the impact of varying fluid saturation was primarily focused on micropores and macropores. The results of this study provided experimental evidence to further test the mechanisms and permeability of geological storage of CO2 in organic-rich self-sourced shale. Full article
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17 pages, 279 KiB  
Article
Psychosocial Safety and Health Hazards and Their Impacts on Offshore Oil and Gas Workers
by Emma D’Antoine, Janis Jansz, Ahmed Barifcani, Sherrilyn Shaw-Mills, Mark Harris and Christopher Lagat
Safety 2023, 9(3), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety9030056 - 15 Aug 2023
Viewed by 2930
Abstract
The offshore oil and gas working environment is an inherently dangerous one, with risks posed to physical safety on a daily basis. One neglected field of research is the added psychosocial stressors present in this environment. This research examined the experiences of offshore [...] Read more.
The offshore oil and gas working environment is an inherently dangerous one, with risks posed to physical safety on a daily basis. One neglected field of research is the added psychosocial stressors present in this environment. This research examined the experiences of offshore oil and gas workers through one-on-one online interviews which were recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed through the qualitative software NVivo, which generated themes and patterns for the responses given to questions that were developed through a focus group. The results of the analysis showed that multiple psychosocial stressors are present in this population, such as fear of speaking up, unsatisfactory company-provided facilities, work–life interference, work status, micromanaging, gender harassment and bullying. In addition, interviews identified that production and time pressures, along with fatigue, can influence accidents and mistakes. Climate factors also cause discomfort. However, these are managed according to best practices by organizations. Due to the timing of the study, COVID-19 was a significant stressor for some, but not all, employees. In conclusion, offshore oil and gas workers face multiple stressors in a dangerous environment that may lead to devastating consequences. Full article
19 pages, 9046 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Antivibration Gloves When Used with Electric Hammers of about 10 kg for Chiseling Limestone Rocks
by Guido Alfaro Degan, Andrea Antonucci and Dario Lippiello
Safety 2023, 9(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety9020027 - 28 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1530
Abstract
The ISO Standard 10819:2013 defines the method for evaluating the performances of antivibration (AV) gloves, but when used in real fields, the protection can be dissimilar to that labeled. This paper investigates the transmissibility, at the palm level, of three different types of [...] Read more.
The ISO Standard 10819:2013 defines the method for evaluating the performances of antivibration (AV) gloves, but when used in real fields, the protection can be dissimilar to that labeled. This paper investigates the transmissibility, at the palm level, of three different types of AV gloves (air, gel, neoprene) and an ordinary leather glove, during the use of four similar electric hammers (average weight of 10 kg, and average impact energy of 18 J), in a limestone quarry plant. As the average triaxial transmissibility for all the hammers, results show very limited benefits in reducing the vibration (6%), with no significative differences among the different gloves. The working leather glove, instead, shows a transmissibility quite equal to the unit. Anyway, results can be different for the same glove when used among the different hammers, providing in some cases 19% of protection. Some differences can be found regarding the transmissibility through the three main axes for the same type of glove: the glove in gel seems to perform better in shear than in compression. The transmissibility in compression is around 20% higher than that provided by the manufacturers of the certified gloves. The usage of specific excitation curves during laboratory tests could help in providing a more accurate estimation of the transmissibility of the gloves when used with a specific tool. Full article
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19 pages, 4991 KiB  
Article
Effects of Ground Subsidence on Vegetation Chlorophyll Content in Semi-Arid Mining Area: From Leaf Scale to Canopy Scale
by Xingchen Yang, Shaogang Lei, Yunxi Shi and Weizhong Wang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 493; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010493 - 28 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1658
Abstract
Ground subsidence is the main cause of vegetation degradation in mining areas. It is of great significance to study the effects of ground subsidence on vegetation. At present, few studies have analyzed the effects of ground subsidence on vegetation from different scales. However, [...] Read more.
Ground subsidence is the main cause of vegetation degradation in mining areas. It is of great significance to study the effects of ground subsidence on vegetation. At present, few studies have analyzed the effects of ground subsidence on vegetation from different scales. However, the conclusions on different scales may differ. In this experiment, chlorophyll content was used as an indicator of vegetation degradation. We conducted a long-term field survey in the Lijiahao coalfield in China. Based on field survey data and remote sensing images, we analyzed the effects of ground subsidence on chlorophyll content from two scales (leaf scale and canopy scale) and summarized the similarities and differences. We found that, regardless of leaf scale or canopy scale, the effects of subsidence on chlorophyll content have the following three characteristics: (1) mining had the least effect on chlorophyll content in the neutral area, followed by the compression area, and the greatest effect on chlorophyll content in the extension area; (2) subsidence had a slight effect on chlorophyll content of Caragana korshins, but a serious effect on chlorophyll content of Stipa baicalensis; (3) chlorophyll content was not immediately affected when the ground sank. It was the cumulative subsidence that affects chlorophyll content. The difference between leaf scale and canopy scale was that the chlorophyll content at canopy scale is more affected by mining. This means that when assessing vegetation degradation, the results obtained by remote sensing were more severe than those measured in the field. We believe that this is because the canopy chlorophyll content obtained by remote sensing is also affected by the plant canopy structure. We recommend that mining and ecological restoration should be carried out concurrently, and that ground fissures should be taken as the focus of ecological restoration. In addition, Caragana korshins ought to be widely planted. Most importantly, managers should assess the effects of ground subsidence on vegetation on different scales. However, managers need to be aware of differences at different scales. Full article
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28 pages, 22746 KiB  
Article
Research on the Dust Diffusion and Pollution Behaviour of Dynamic Tunneling in Header Excavators Based on Dynamic Mesh Technology and Field Measurement
by Xi Chen, Hao Zhang, Shaocheng Ge, Cunbao Deng, Chaonan Fan, Guoliang Ma and Weichao Li
Energies 2022, 15(23), 8945; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15238945 - 26 Nov 2022
Viewed by 1347
Abstract
In order to accurately characterize and evaluate dust particle diffusion in the dynamic tunneling process of a boring machine, this study considers the 31,116 main transport chute heaving face of the Lijiahao coal mine as a case study. A dynamic tunneling model is [...] Read more.
In order to accurately characterize and evaluate dust particle diffusion in the dynamic tunneling process of a boring machine, this study considers the 31,116 main transport chute heaving face of the Lijiahao coal mine as a case study. A dynamic tunneling model is developed considering the real dynamic tunneling state of the header, to carry out an in-depth analysis of the spatial and temporal evolution of wind flow and dust dispersion in the tunnel under dynamic excavation. In addition, the results were compared against the calculations of a static standard excavation model of a conventional header. Employing CFD analysis accompanied by field measurements, it was highlighted that the dynamic tunneling of the header leads to an increase in the pressure difference and the turbulent kinetic energy at the working face. Moreover, an increase in the number of vortices was reported, and a higher concentration of dust spreads more quickly along the return wind side wall to the return flow area. On the other hand, the high concentration of dust under the standard tunneling model was found to accumulate a lot on the return wind side. Simultaneously, as the distance between the pressurized air outlet and the working face increases, the average wind speed in the vortex-type wind flow area at the front of the tunnel decreases. When t = 60 s, the return flow area expands to a space of 8 m~24 m from the head, and the dust accumulated above the header spreads to the back of the header to form a high concentration dust region of more than 500 mg/m³. It was shown that the range of high-concentration dust clouds in the breathing zone decreases compared to the results of the standard tunneling model. Moreover, the dust concentration in the breathing zone of the driver is significantly lower than that reported by the standard tunneling model. Based on the results of the field test, the average error between the simulated and measured data of the dynamic tunneling model was calculated to be around 6.46%, thus demonstrating the model’s capability in describing the real working conditions of the heave tunnel. Full article
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