Topic Editors

Dr. Jie Li
Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016, China
1. Faculty of Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Environmental Protection, Brno University of Technology, Purkynova 118, 612 00 Brno, Czech Republic
2. Soil & Water Research Infrastructure, Biology Centre CAS, Na Sádkách 7, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Benátská 2, CZ-12800 Prague, Czech Republic

Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Agro-Ecosystems and Other Anthropogenically Maintained Ecosystems

Abstract submission deadline
30 July 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 September 2024
Viewed by
7193

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

"Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Agro-Ecosystems and Other Anthropogenically Maintained Ecosystems" explores the intricate dynamics and challenges associated with carbon and nitrogen cycling in anthropogenically maintained ecosystems. Carbon and nitrogen are essential nutrients for plant growth, and their availability and effective management are critical to the development of sustainable agriculture and many anthropogenically maintained ecosystems. This collection of articles brings together the latest research into various aspects of carbon and nitrogen cycling in anthropogenically maintained ecosystems. 

For this collection, we welcome manuscripts that provide novel insights into a broad range of topics related to carbon and nitrogen cycling in agro-ecosystems and other anthropogenically maintained ecosystems, including:

  • Carbon and nitrogen sources and inputs;
  • Carbon and nitrogen transformation and cycling processes;
  • Carbon and nitrogen losses and environmental impacts;
  • Carbon and nitrogen use efficiency and agricultural productivity;
  • Carbon and nitrogen management. 

By sharing your research, you will contribute to advancing knowledge in this critical area. We look forward to receiving your submissions and assembling a comprehensive collection of articles that will shape the future of sustainable carbon and nitrogen management in anthropogenically maintained ecosystems. 

Dr. Jie Li
Dr. Adnan Mustafa
Prof. Dr. Jan Frouz
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • carbon and nitrogen cycling
  • crop
  • agroecosystems
  • soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics
  • microbial ecology
  • micro-organism
  • anthropogenically maintained ecosystems

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agriculture
agriculture
3.6 4.9 2011 17.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 6.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Microorganisms
microorganisms
4.5 7.4 2013 15.1 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Plants
plants
4.5 6.5 2012 15.3 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Soil Systems
soilsystems
3.5 5.3 2017 27.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Nitrogen
nitrogen
- 2.6 2020 14.5 Days CHF 1000 Submit

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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14 pages, 1842 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Almond Hull and Shell Amendments across Organic Matter Management of Orchard Soils
by Leah Wolff Hartman, Ellie M. Andrews, Erini G. Galatis, Amélie C. M. Gaudin, Patrick H. Brown and Sat Darshan S. Khalsa
Soil Syst. 2024, 8(2), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems8020051 - 4 May 2024
Viewed by 728
Abstract
Hulls and shells are an abundant by-product from almond production with potential as an organic matter amendment (OMA). A combination of incubation study and field research was conducted in 2019–2021 to evaluate the impacts of three practices in combination on orchard soils’ C [...] Read more.
Hulls and shells are an abundant by-product from almond production with potential as an organic matter amendment (OMA). A combination of incubation study and field research was conducted in 2019–2021 to evaluate the impacts of three practices in combination on orchard soils’ C and N cycling, including a 210-day period of laboratory incubation with hulls and shells, and field sampling of orchard soils with and without historic applications of green waste compost as an OMA; with hulls and shells and with and without off-ground harvest where orchard soils remain undisturbed year round. Hulls and shells increased microbial biomass carbon in the field study by 248 μg g−1 dry soil after one year (p < 0.001) and during incubation, and increased cumulative respiration in soils with and without historic OMA (p < 0.001). Historic OMA resulted in double the total soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) compared to soil without resulting in significantly higher respiration and N mineralization when amended with hulls and shells. The decomposition of hull and shell biomass following surface application progressed at similar rates in the laboratory and field (1.7 g kg−1 d−1 during incubation (R2 = 0.84) and 1.3 g kg−1 d−1 in the field trial (R2 = 0.91). Our results highlight the suitability of hulls and shells as a by-product source of OMA for improving soil health in orchards with historic OMA and transitioning to organic matter management. Full article
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24 pages, 6167 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances in Application of 1D Nanomaterials for Photocatalytic Nitrogen Fixation
by Ragesh Nath R., Shamkumar P. Deshmukh, Sachin J. Kamble and Valmiki B. Koli
Nitrogen 2024, 5(2), 349-372; https://doi.org/10.3390/nitrogen5020023 - 22 Apr 2024
Viewed by 937
Abstract
Ammonia, as the second most-produced chemical worldwide, serves diverse roles in the industrial and agricultural sectors. However, its conventional production via the Haber–Bosch process poses significant challenges, including high energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. In contrast, photocatalytic nitrogen (N2) fixation, [...] Read more.
Ammonia, as the second most-produced chemical worldwide, serves diverse roles in the industrial and agricultural sectors. However, its conventional production via the Haber–Bosch process poses significant challenges, including high energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. In contrast, photocatalytic nitrogen (N2) fixation, utilizing solar energy with minimal emissions, offers a promising method for sustainable ammonia synthesis. Despite ongoing efforts, photocatalytic nitrogen fixation catalysts continue to encounter challenges such as inadequate N2 adsorption, limited light absorption, and rapid photocarrier recombination. This review explores how the electronic structure and surface characteristics of one-dimensional nanomaterials could mitigate these challenges, making them promising photocatalysts for N2 fixation. The review delves into the underlying photocatalytic mechanisms of nitrogen fixation and various synthesis methods for one-dimensional nanomaterials. Additionally, it highlights the role of the high surface area of one-dimensional nanomaterials in enhancing photocatalytic performance. A comparative analysis of the photocatalytic nitrogen fixation capabilities of different one-dimensional nanomaterials is provided. Lastly, the review offers insights into potential future advancements in photocatalytic nitrogen fixation. Full article
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19 pages, 5373 KiB  
Article
Long-Term Cropping Management Practices Affect the Biochemical Properties of an Alabama Ultisol
by Dexter B. Watts, Zhongqi He, Xinhua Yin, H. Allen Torbert, Zachary N. Senwo and Haile Tewolde
Soil Syst. 2024, 8(2), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems8020041 - 5 Apr 2024
Viewed by 822
Abstract
Interest in improving the long-term sustainability of agricultural production systems has focused on identifying management practices that promote soil health. No tillage, cover cropping, and amending soils with broiler (Gallus gallus domesticus L.) litter are commonly adopted conservation practices that have been [...] Read more.
Interest in improving the long-term sustainability of agricultural production systems has focused on identifying management practices that promote soil health. No tillage, cover cropping, and amending soils with broiler (Gallus gallus domesticus L.) litter are commonly adopted conservation practices that have been shown to improve soil fertility and crop yield. However, the overall influence of these conservation practices on soil health in the southeastern US are not well understood. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate the influence of tillage, broiler litter (BL) applications, and cropping systems on soil biochemical properties. Soils were collected from field research plots under long-term management (>than 25 years of tillage, 15 years of broiler litter application, and 15 years of cropping system). Soil microbial biomass, C, N, and P, amidohydrolases, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) were evaluated as indicators of soil health. Adopting tillage and BL into the agricultural management system modified the biochemical parameters of the soils evaluated. Most of these modifications occurred in the 0–5 cm depth. Higher microbial biomass carbon (MBC; 85%) and nitrogen (MBN; 10%) and enzyme activities of asparaginase (65%) and glutaminase (70%) were observed in the 0–5 cm depth under no tillage (NT) compared to conventional tillage (CT), indicating greater biological activities were established in these soil ecosystems. Broiler litter applications increased microbial biomass N and activities of asparaginase and glutaminase in both soil depths. In addition, microbial biomass phosphorus (MBP) was increased following BL application in the 0–5 cm depth. The results suggest that long-term management of NT and BL additions can improve the health of eroded southeastern US soils by altering the soil biochemical parameters. Full article
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17 pages, 2809 KiB  
Article
Relationship between Nitrogen Dynamics and Key Microbial Nitrogen-Cycling Genes in an Intensive Freshwater Aquaculture Pond
by Yifeng Yan, Junbo Zhou, Chenghao Du, Qian Yang, Jinhe Huang, Zhaolei Wang, Jun Xu and Min Zhang
Microorganisms 2024, 12(2), 266; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12020266 - 26 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1011
Abstract
Intensive aquaculture in high-density hybrid snakehead [Channa maculata (♀) × Channa argus (♂)] fishponds can lead to toxic conditions for fish. This study investigated nitrogen migration and transformation in these fishponds during different cultivation periods. Using qPCR technology, we analyzed the abundance [...] Read more.
Intensive aquaculture in high-density hybrid snakehead [Channa maculata (♀) × Channa argus (♂)] fishponds can lead to toxic conditions for fish. This study investigated nitrogen migration and transformation in these fishponds during different cultivation periods. Using qPCR technology, we analyzed the abundance variation of nitrogen-cycling microorganisms in water and sediment to reveal the nitrogen metabolism characteristics of hybrid snakehead fishponds. The results showed that fish biomass significantly impacts suspended particulate matter (SPM) flux. At the sediment–water interface, inorganic nitrogen fluxes showed predominant NO3-N absorption by sediments and NH4+-N and NO2-N release, especially in later cultivation stages. Sediments were rich in nirS and AMX 16S rRNA genes (ranging from 4.04 × 109 to 1.01 × 1010 and 1.19 × 108 to 2.62 × 108 copies/g, respectively) with nirS-type denitrifiers potentially dominating the denitrification process. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were found to dominate the ammonia oxidation process over ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in both water and sediment. Redundancy analysis revealed a positive correlation between SPM flux, Chlorophyll a (Chl-a), and denitrification genes in the water, and between nitrogen-cycling genes and NH4+/NO2 fluxes at the interface. These findings provide a scientific basis for nitrogen control in hybrid snakehead fishponds. Full article
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14 pages, 2101 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Various Long-Term Fertilizer Applications on Soil Carbon Fractions in a Winter Wheat Monoculture Area
by Lifan Yang, Xuan Hu, Zixuan Chang, Hongmei Song, Tingliang Li and Li Li
Agronomy 2024, 14(1), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14010082 - 29 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1138
Abstract
The Loess Plateau in China has long grappled with issues such as chronic soil erosion, poor soil structure, and diminished organic matter. Soil organic carbon plays a crucial role in enhancing soil fertility, and fertilization is a key tool that influences it. In [...] Read more.
The Loess Plateau in China has long grappled with issues such as chronic soil erosion, poor soil structure, and diminished organic matter. Soil organic carbon plays a crucial role in enhancing soil fertility, and fertilization is a key tool that influences it. In a comprehensive field experiment, we examined five fertilization methods: no fertilization (CK); traditional fertilization used by local farmers (FP); nutrient-balanced fertilization with nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (OF); chemical fertilizers used in conjunction with organic fertilizers (OFM); and chemical fertilizers paired with bio-organic fertilizers (OFB). Our findings revealed that the OFM and OFB treatments were the most effective, explaining 84.35% and 81.26% of the variation in soil carbon sequestration, respectively. Further, the OF, OFM, and OFB treatments demonstrated superior effectiveness compared with the FP treatment in enhancing the soil carbon fractions. However, these fertilization patterns did not significantly alter the active-to-inert carbon ratio of the soil. OF, OFM, and OFB treatments enhanced the stability of soil carbon pools more than FP treatment. In structural equation modeling, factors such as microbial biomass nitrogen and phosphorus, soil pH, and β-N-acetyl glucosidase indirectly exhibited a limiting effect on the carbon pool stability index (CPSI), while β-glucosidase displayed an indirect positive correlation with the carbon fractions. In contrast, dissolved organic carbon, low-molecular-weight organic carbon, high-molecular-weight organic carbon, and crop yield demonstrated direct positive correlations with the CPSI. Consequently, both a balanced application of chemical fertilizers and the combination of organic and chemical fertilizers were effective in enhancing and sustaining the soil’s organic carbon content, thereby contributing to soil fertility stability. To this end, this study can inform the efficient selection and use of fertilizers, improving crop yield and soil carbon content. Full article
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14 pages, 955 KiB  
Article
Adjustment of Meat Consumption Structure under the Dual Goals of Food Security and Carbon Reduction in China
by Sicheng Zhao, Tingyu Li, Guogang Wang and Yongxiang Zhang
Agriculture 2023, 13(12), 2242; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13122242 - 5 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1280
Abstract
With the progress of economic development and increase in income, there have been significant transformations in the food consumption patterns among Chinese residents. Grain consumption has declined while the consumption of livestock products such as meat, poultry, eggs, and milk has gradually risen. [...] Read more.
With the progress of economic development and increase in income, there have been significant transformations in the food consumption patterns among Chinese residents. Grain consumption has declined while the consumption of livestock products such as meat, poultry, eggs, and milk has gradually risen. Moreover, noteworthy adjustments have been observed in the meat consumption structure itself, with a substantial increase in poultry consumption and a significant decrease in pork consumption as representative of red meat. This study collects data mainly from the “Brick Agricultural Database” and “China National Grain & Oils Information Center”. And then, we employ the China Agricultural Industry Model (CASM) to simulate the economic and ecological consequences of augmenting poultry consumption as a substitute for red meat intake. The research findings demonstrate that ensuring an adequate intake of livestock products for residents without any decline will stimulate the doubling of China’s poultry meat demand by 2035 compared to 2020 while replacing pork. This would reduce feed grain requirements by 50 million tons and achieve carbon emission reductions amounting to 82 million tons. If we consider the consumption of poultry consumption growth in conjunction with its substitution for other red meats such as pork, beef, and mutton, this will save approximately 20 million tons of feed grains and lead to a reduction of around 103 million tons in carbon emissions. In conclusion, promoting future increases in poultry consumption as a substitute for pork and other red meat will yield extensive economic andecological benefits contributing toward international food security goals, as well as global carbon reduction targets. Additionally, advocating for increasing poultry consumption will also reduce the risk of chronic diseases and malignant tumors; this will significantly improve the national health states. Full article
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