Topic Editors

Department of Agricultural and Forestry Engineering, University of Valladolid, Campus Duques de Soria, 42004 Soria, Spain
Instituto de Computación, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay
Research Center in Engineering and Applied Sciences, Autonomous University of Morelos State (UAEM), Avenida Universidad 1001 Colonia Chamilpa, Cuernavaca 62209, Mexico

Smart Cities: Infrastructure, Innovation, Technology, Governance and Citizenship

Abstract submission deadline
20 July 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 September 2024
Viewed by
28089

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Today, we face the reality that cities are changing. As this change occurs, advances in research must provide solutions to the various problems that arise as consequences of this change. Administrations, universities, and companies must cooperate to lay the foundations of the smart city.

Examples of such solutions include the integration of renewable energy sources, energy efficiency (in construction and processes), sustainable mobility, the integration of the IoT and smart systems, and advanced and efficient infrastructures, as well as water and energy, food sustainability, climate change, and sustainable development goals, among others.

Thus, the main pillars of a city are as follows:

  • Energy efficiency and sustainability;
  • Infrastructure, energy, and the environment;
  • Mobility and IoT;
  • Governance and citizenship.

We invite submissions of both original research and review articles. Additionally, papers pertaining to the VI Ibero-American Congress of Smart Cities (ICSC-CITIES 2023) will be considered. We hope that this collection of papers will serve as an inspiration for all researchers interested in the prosperity of smart cities.

Prof. Dr. Luis Hernández-Callejo
Prof. Dr. Sergio Nesmachnow
Prof. Dr. Pedro Moreno-Bernal
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • IoT and ubiquitous devices
  • smart mobility
  • energy
  • smart grid
  • governance and citizenship
  • energy efficiency and sustainability
  • smart industry
  • smart environment
  • smart economy, development, and education
  • smart public services (waste management, health, public transportation, among others)
  • urban informatics, big data, data management, analytics and artificial intelligence for smart cities
  • other developments for smart cities

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Buildings
buildings
3.8 3.1 2011 14.6 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Sensors
sensors
3.9 6.8 2001 17 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Smart Cities
smartcities
6.4 8.5 2018 20.2 Days CHF 2000 Submit
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Urban Science
urbansci
2.0 4.5 2017 23.7 Days CHF 1600 Submit
Applied Sciences
applsci
2.7 4.5 2011 16.9 Days CHF 2400 Submit

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Published Papers (14 papers)

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32 pages, 16871 KiB  
Article
Structural Health Monitoring for Prefabricated Building Envelope under Stress Tests
by Laura Vandi, Maria Teresa Calcagni, Francesco Belletti, Giuseppe Pandarese, Milena Martarelli, Gian Marco Revel, Vincent Docter and Alessandro Pracucci
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(8), 3260; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14083260 - 12 Apr 2024
Viewed by 280
Abstract
This paper details the comprehensive activities conducted in a laboratory setting to assess the structural health monitoring (SHM) of prefabricated building envelopes. Integrating sensors into building components like curtain wall facades poses challenges but offers opportunities for monitoring structural health, requiring compliance with [...] Read more.
This paper details the comprehensive activities conducted in a laboratory setting to assess the structural health monitoring (SHM) of prefabricated building envelopes. Integrating sensors into building components like curtain wall facades poses challenges but offers opportunities for monitoring structural health, requiring compliance with regulatory standards. The research investigates the possibility of defining a kit of conventional and multi-parameter sensors integrated within the building envelope to monitor its behavior during the performance test conducted. The kit of sensors also includes Fiber Optic Sensors for effectively monitoring building envelope behavior and structural integrity. In this context, the European project InComEss (H2020-GA862597) aims to define a stand-alone solution for SHM using Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Systems (PE-EHS) for façade monitoring through FBG/FOS system. After analyzing the main façade structural stress, a series of FBGs, accelerometers, and force washers were integrated within a 1:1 scale façade prototype and tested in a laboratory following the test sequence parameters required by the curtain wall standard EN 13830. The data collected were analyzed with the aim of monitoring the façade behavior before and after the tests. The results show that the façade’s performance passed the assessing test criteria without reporting any damages. In addition, the outcomes demonstrated the effectiveness of the defined kit of multi-parameter sensors for the building envelope’s SHM. Full article
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23 pages, 2059 KiB  
Review
Contextualizing the Smart City in Africa: Balancing Human-Centered and Techno-Centric Perspectives for Smart Urban Performance
by Nessrine Moumen, Hassan Radoine, Kh Md Nahiduzzaman and Hassane Jarar Oulidi
Smart Cities 2024, 7(2), 712-734; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities7020029 - 27 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1262
Abstract
The continuous growth of urban populations and the complexities of their current management in Africa have driven local governments to explore new technologies to optimize their urban and territorial performance. These governments and related stakeholders’ resort to the term “smart city” to orient [...] Read more.
The continuous growth of urban populations and the complexities of their current management in Africa have driven local governments to explore new technologies to optimize their urban and territorial performance. These governments and related stakeholders’ resort to the term “smart city” to orient the current urban planning policies and practices to be more efficient and adequate. Nevertheless, the issue that remains is how to contextualize this global term that has not yet been fully adopted by African cities that have claimed to be “Smart”. This contextualization becomes more complex in this critical context, where the city has not yet reached an ideal performance. Therefore, to reach this prospective African smart city, a critical review of how it would be both human-centered and techno-centered is imperative. This paper would review accordingly the above argument and set key performance indicator-based methodology on how to evaluate the smartness of a city in the African context. Full article
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18 pages, 3116 KiB  
Article
Bibliometric Study on the Conceptualisation of Smart City and Education
by Debora Scala, Ángel Ignacio Aguilar Cuesta, Maria Ángeles Rodríguez-Domenech and María del Carmen Cañizares Ruiz
Smart Cities 2024, 7(1), 597-614; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities7010024 - 10 Feb 2024
Viewed by 764
Abstract
In recent years, research in the smart city sector has experienced exponential growth, establishing itself as a fundamental and multifaceted field of study. Education is one of the sectors of interest in smart cities. Concurrently, the extensive academic literature on smart cities makes [...] Read more.
In recent years, research in the smart city sector has experienced exponential growth, establishing itself as a fundamental and multifaceted field of study. Education is one of the sectors of interest in smart cities. Concurrently, the extensive academic literature on smart cities makes identifying the main areas of interest related to education, leading institutions and authors, potential interconnections between different disciplines, and existing gaps more complicated. This article maps the knowledge domain of education in smart cities through a bibliometric analysis to identify current trends, research networks, and topics of greatest interest. A total of 88 articles, published between 2000 and 2023, were examined using an interdisciplinary approach. The leading countries are mainly located in Europe and North America and include China. Bibliometrics provides an intellectual configuration of knowledge on education in smart cities; a co-word analysis identifies conceptual sub-domains in specific themes. In general, education within smart cities represents a universal challenge that requires a structured and interdisciplinary approach at all levels. Finally, this paper offers some suggestions for future research, adopting a more comprehensive view of the areas of investigation through a holistic analysis of stakeholders. Full article
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23 pages, 3486 KiB  
Article
Benchmarking the Functional, Technical, and Business Characteristics of Automated Passenger Counting Products
by Cristina Pronello, Luca Baratti and Deepan Anbarasan
Smart Cities 2024, 7(1), 302-324; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities7010013 - 22 Jan 2024
Viewed by 691
Abstract
Urban transport planning and the integration of various mobility options have become increasingly complex, necessitating a thorough understanding of user mobility patterns and their diverse needs. This paper focuses on benchmarking different Automatic Passenger Counting (APC) technologies, which play a key role in [...] Read more.
Urban transport planning and the integration of various mobility options have become increasingly complex, necessitating a thorough understanding of user mobility patterns and their diverse needs. This paper focuses on benchmarking different Automatic Passenger Counting (APC) technologies, which play a key role in Mobility as a Service (MaaS) systems. APC systems provide valuable data for analysing mobility patterns and informing decisions about resource allocation. Our study presents a comprehensive data collection and benchmark analysis of APC solutions. The literature review emphasises the significance of passenger counting for transport companies and discusses various existing APC technologies, such as pressure sensors, wireless sensors, optical infrared sensors (IR), and video image technology. Real-world applications of APC systems are examined, highlighting experimental results and their potential for improving accuracy. The methodology outlines the data collection process, which involved identifying APC companies, conducting interviews with companies and customers, and administering an ad hoc survey to gather specific information about APC systems. The collected data were used to establish criteria and key performance indicators (KPIs) for the benchmarking analysis. The benchmarking analysis compares APC devices and companies based on ten criteria: technology, accuracy, environment, coverage, interface, interference, robustness (for devices), price, pricing model, and system integration (for companies). KPIs were developed to measure performance and make comparison easier. The results of the benchmarking analysis offer insights into the costs and accuracy of different APC systems, enabling informed decision making regarding system selection and implementation. The findings fill a research gap and provide valuable information for transport companies and policy makers, and we offer a comprehensive analysis of APC systems, highlighting their strengths, weaknesses, and business strategies. The paper concludes by discussing limitations and suggesting future research directions for APC technologies. Full article
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18 pages, 1290 KiB  
Article
The Role of Performance in Smart Meter’s Acceptance: A Survey in Joinville, Brazil
by Diego Fettermann, Pedro Christoffel, Jaime Castillo and Angelo Sant’Anna
Urban Sci. 2024, 8(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci8010001 - 20 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1522
Abstract
The incorporation of renewable energy sources necessitates the upgrade of the electrical grid to a smart grid, which involves the implementation of smart meters. Although smart meters provide benefits to users, many smart meter implementation projects have failed to be accepted by users. [...] Read more.
The incorporation of renewable energy sources necessitates the upgrade of the electrical grid to a smart grid, which involves the implementation of smart meters. Although smart meters provide benefits to users, many smart meter implementation projects have failed to be accepted by users. This article assesses the factors influencing the acceptance of household smart meters in Joinville, a city in the south of Brazil. Based on the Unified and Extended Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT2), a structural equation model was estimated using data from a sample of 136 respondents in the city of Joinville. The results indicate that Performance Expectancy, Hedonic Motivation, and Social Influence constructs have a more substantial effect on the Intention to Use smart meters. The results provide evidence for planning the upgrade of the electrical grid by implementing smart meters in southern Brazil. Full article
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15 pages, 560 KiB  
Article
Usefulness of a Civic Engagement Scale for Research on Smart Cities: Measuring Attitudes and Behavior
by Jiri Remr
Smart Cities 2023, 6(6), 3251-3265; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities6060144 - 23 Nov 2023
Viewed by 989
Abstract
Civic engagement plays a critical role in smart city innovation and urban development by encouraging active participation in civic activities such as volunteering, voting, community organizing, or advocacy, all of which contribute to the development of local communities. This study highlights the need [...] Read more.
Civic engagement plays a critical role in smart city innovation and urban development by encouraging active participation in civic activities such as volunteering, voting, community organizing, or advocacy, all of which contribute to the development of local communities. This study highlights the need to assess civic engagement in smart cities in order to improve the interactions between technology and society. The study assessed the reliability and validity of the Civic Engagement Scale (CES) in the Czech context. The results presented are based on a representative sample of 1366 respondents from the general population aged 15–74. The study included univariate statistics, tests of internal consistency, and principal component analysis. In addition, the study presents the results of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) that was conducted to examine the fit of the proposed model to empirical data. The results indicate that the CES has excellent psychometric properties, including high internal consistency and favorable absolute and incremental indices. The Czech version of the CES can be considered a valid and reliable instrument. The findings suggest using CES to research and evaluate policy interventions aimed at developing digital platforms that enable citizens to easily participate in urban planning and smart city projects, community-driven smart city projects that ensure local needs and preferences are addressed, or implementing incentive programs for citizens. Full article
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23 pages, 7024 KiB  
Article
Measuring Heat Stress for Human Health in Cities: A Low-Cost Prototype Tested in a District of Valencia, Spain
by Àlex Aduna-Sánchez, Antonio Correcher, David Alfonso-Solar and Carlos Vargas-Salgado
Sensors 2023, 23(22), 9285; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23229285 - 20 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1008
Abstract
Nowadays, the measurement of heat stress indices is of principal importance due to the escalating impact of global warming. As temperatures continue to rise, the well-being and health of individuals are increasingly at risk, which can lead to a detrimental effect on human [...] Read more.
Nowadays, the measurement of heat stress indices is of principal importance due to the escalating impact of global warming. As temperatures continue to rise, the well-being and health of individuals are increasingly at risk, which can lead to a detrimental effect on human performance and behavior. Hence, monitoring and assessing heat stress indices have become necessary for ensuring the safety and comfort of individuals. Thermal comfort indices, such as wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT), Tropical Summer Index (TSI), and Predicted Heat Strain (PHS), as well as parameters like mean radiant temperature (MRT), are typically used for assessing and controlling heat stress conditions in working and urban environments. Therefore, measurement and monitoring of these parameters should be obtained for any environment in which people are constantly exposed. Modern cities collect and publish this relevant information following the Smart City concept. To monitor large cities, cost-effective solutions must be developed. This work presents the results of a Heat Stress Monitoring (HSM) system prototype network tested in the Benicalap-Ciutat Fallera district in Valencia, Spain. The scope of this work is to design, commission, and test a low-cost prototype that is able to measure heat stress indices. The Heat Stress Monitoring system comprises a central unit or receiver and several transmitters communicating via radiofrequency. The transmitter accurately measures wind speed, air temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, solar irradiation, and black globe temperature. The receiver has a 4G modem that sends the data to an SQL database in the cloud. The devices were tested over one year, showing that radio data transmission is reliable up to 700 m from the receiver. The system’s power supply, composed of a Photovoltaic panel and Lithium-ion batteries, provided off-grid capabilities to the transmitter, with a tested backup autonomy of up to 36 days per charge. Then, indicators such as WBGT, TSI, and MRT were successfully estimated using the data collected by the devices. The material cost of a 12-point network is around EUR 2430 with a competitive price of EUR 190 per device. Full article
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20 pages, 1579 KiB  
Article
Strengthening Urban Resilience: Understanding the Interdependencies of Outer Space and Strategic Planning for Sustainable Smart Environments
by Ulpia-Elena Botezatu, Olga Bucovetchi, Adrian V. Gheorghe and Radu D. Stanciu
Smart Cities 2023, 6(5), 2499-2518; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities6050113 - 22 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1130
Abstract
The conventional approach to urban planning has predominantly focused on horizontal dimensions, disregarding the potential risks originating from outer space. This paper aims to initiate a discourse on the vertical dimension of cities, which is influenced by outer space, as an essential element [...] Read more.
The conventional approach to urban planning has predominantly focused on horizontal dimensions, disregarding the potential risks originating from outer space. This paper aims to initiate a discourse on the vertical dimension of cities, which is influenced by outer space, as an essential element of strategic urban planning. Through an examination of a highly disruptive incident in outer space involving a collision between the Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 satellites, this article elucidates the intricate interdependencies between urban areas and outer space infrastructure and services. Leveraging the principles of critical infrastructure protection, which bridge the urban and outer space domains, and employing simulation methods and software, this study articulates the intricate governance complexities of urban security and presents viable solutions for its enhancement. Consequently, the study contributes to the ongoing deliberations regarding the spatial integration of security practices by providing scholarly discourse on urban governance with potential strategies for cultivating sustainable smart cities. In essence, the intrinsic resilience of urban areas heavily relies on the interconnections between cities and outer space, necessitating urban strategists to acknowledge and comprehend these intricate interdependencies. To ensure sustainable urban development, it is imperative to fortify smart cities’ resilience against space debris through the implementation of more stringent regulations. Full article
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13 pages, 2836 KiB  
Communication
Planning on the Verge of AI, or AI on the Verge of Planning
by Thomas W. Sanchez
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(3), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci7030070 - 28 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 5623
Abstract
The urban planning process is complex, involving social, economic, environmental, and political systems. Knowledge of how these systems interact is the domain of professional planners. Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) present planners with a ripe opportunity to critically assess their approaches and explore [...] Read more.
The urban planning process is complex, involving social, economic, environmental, and political systems. Knowledge of how these systems interact is the domain of professional planners. Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) present planners with a ripe opportunity to critically assess their approaches and explore how new data collection, analysis, and methods can augment the understanding of places as they seek to anticipate futures with improved quality of life. AI can offer access to more and better information about travel patterns, energy consumption, land utilization, and environmental impacts, while also helping to better integrate these systems, which is what planners do. The adoption process will likely be gradual and involve significant time and resources. This article highlights several topics and issues that should be considered during this process. It is argued that planners will be well-served by approaching AI tools in a strategic manner that involves the topics discussed here. Full article
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19 pages, 2737 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Impact of Public Participation Processes on Participants in Smart City Development: A Scoping Review
by Coline Senior, Alenka Temeljotov Salaj, Agnar Johansen and Jardar Lohne
Buildings 2023, 13(6), 1484; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13061484 - 08 Jun 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2238
Abstract
This paper provides an overview of the current state of research on the evaluation methods of participatory processes in smart cities. Specifically, it aims to identify and analyze existing evaluation methods and frameworks for public participation (PP) in smart city development. The study [...] Read more.
This paper provides an overview of the current state of research on the evaluation methods of participatory processes in smart cities. Specifically, it aims to identify and analyze existing evaluation methods and frameworks for public participation (PP) in smart city development. The study focuses on the evaluation of participatory processes to find key indicators and enable an assessment of PP from multiple perspectives. A scoping literature review was conducted to analyze the past ten years of scientific literature on the topic. Relevant literature was retrieved from Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar, and articles were selected based on a set of criteria to ensure quality and relevance. We found that digital participation, also known as “e-participation”, is the most used method either exclusively or mixed with in-person methods. The level of participation achieved was mostly limited to the first two degrees of PP (i.e., information and consultation), and only a few papers addressed the highest degrees (i.e., agenda-setting and co-management). The impact on participants was mostly related to knowledge and skills, awareness raising, and satisfaction with the process and method. This paper highlights the potential to upskill citizens and enhance their understanding of sustainable urban development, fostering their commitment to achieving the United Nations’ sustainability goals for climate change mitigation in the urban context. Full article
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22 pages, 637 KiB  
Hypothesis
Exploring the Challenges and Issues in Adopting Cybersecurity in Saudi Smart Cities: Conceptualization of the Cybersecurity-Based UTAUT Model
by Nawaf Alhalafi and Prakash Veeraraghavan
Smart Cities 2023, 6(3), 1523-1544; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities6030072 - 29 May 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2516
Abstract
This study aims to explore the challenges and issues in adopting cybersecurity practices in smart Saudi cities and to develop and validate a newly developed cybersecurity-based unified theory of acceptance and use of technology 3 (UTAUT3) model. The study has a twofold purpose. [...] Read more.
This study aims to explore the challenges and issues in adopting cybersecurity practices in smart Saudi cities and to develop and validate a newly developed cybersecurity-based unified theory of acceptance and use of technology 3 (UTAUT3) model. The study has a twofold purpose. First, it identified the key challenges and issues in adopting smart cities in Saudi smart cities. Second, it developed a technology-based model to adopt cybersecurity practices in Saudi smart cities. Two surveys were conducted to achieve these objectives. The first survey identified challenges and gaps in adopting cybersecurity practices in smart cities, revealing concerns about weak cybersecurity platforms, privacy breaches, and the impact of IT infrastructure advancements on Saudi culture (N = 554: common public). The second survey focused on developing and validating a cybersecurity-based UTAUT3 model (N = 108: IT professionals), emphasizing nine factors: performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, safety, resiliency, availability, confidentiality, and integrity of cybersecurity. The model’s validity and reliability were assessed, demonstrating its potential for understanding user behavior and adoption patterns in smart cities. The study findings provide valuable insights into the factors influencing the adoption of cybersecurity measures in smart Saudi cities, highlighting the need for targeted strategies, effective awareness programs, and collaboration between stakeholders to promote a secure and resilient digital environment. Future research may focus on refining the model, extending its applicability to other regions or countries, and investigating the impact of emerging technologies and evolving cyber threats on user behavior and cybersecurity practices. Full article
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22 pages, 3129 KiB  
Article
A Review of the Theory and Practice of Smart City Construction in China
by Zhengrong Liu and Jianping Wu
Sustainability 2023, 15(9), 7161; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15097161 - 25 Apr 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3685
Abstract
The construction of smart cities is an imperative trend for high-quality urban development and represents a crucial solution to various problems that afflict urbanization, such as population growth pressure, resource scarcity, environmental degradation, and economic frailty. To create a smart city, it is [...] Read more.
The construction of smart cities is an imperative trend for high-quality urban development and represents a crucial solution to various problems that afflict urbanization, such as population growth pressure, resource scarcity, environmental degradation, and economic frailty. To create a smart city, it is essential to gain a profound understanding of the evolution and experiences of urban development and have a clear grasp of the concept, emphasis, and developmental trajectory of smart cities. However, previous research and theoretical frameworks have mainly focused on the digital transformation of cities, the application of new generation information technologies, and the comprehensive intelligence of cities, neglecting the fundamental positioning and value of cities, which is the people’s central position and pursuit of happiness. This has led to many situations where intelligence is pursued for the sake of intelligence, resulting in inefficient use and allocation of resources. This paper puts forth a framework for the three generations of smart city construction and their meanings at the conceptual level, conducts an in-depth analysis of the development process and challenges of smart cities in China, and provides suggestions for improvement. Full article
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16 pages, 3514 KiB  
Article
Development of an Intelligent Personal Assistant System Based on IoT for People with Disabilities
by Abd-elmegeid Amin Ali, Mohamed Mashhour, Ahmed S. Salama, Rasha Shoitan and Hassan Shaban
Sustainability 2023, 15(6), 5166; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065166 - 14 Mar 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2086
Abstract
Approximately 15% of the world’s population suffers from different types of disabilities. These people face many challenges when trying to interact with their home appliances. Various solutions are introduced to increase their quality of life, such as controlling their devices remotely through their [...] Read more.
Approximately 15% of the world’s population suffers from different types of disabilities. These people face many challenges when trying to interact with their home appliances. Various solutions are introduced to increase their quality of life, such as controlling their devices remotely through their voices. However, these solutions use command templates that fail to understand the unstructured or semi-structured command. Many authors have recently integrated intelligent personal assistant (IPA) systems, such as Google Assistant, Siri, and Alexa, with control circuits to exploit the advantages of the NLP of these IPAs to control traditional home appliances. However, this solution still struggles with understanding unstructured commands and requires the internet to be available for controlling the devices. This research proposes a new IPA system integrated with IoT, called IRON, for disabled people to use to control customizable devices with a structured and unstructured voice command. The proposed algorithm receives voice orders from the person in a structured or unstructured form and transforms them into text based on the Google Speech-to-Text API. The natural language processing technique splits the commands into tokens to determine the device name and the command type, whether it is a question about device status or a statement. Afterward, the logistic regression classifies the rest of the tokens as positive or negative to turn on or off the device, then sends the command to a Raspberry Pi to control the device. The proposed IRON system is implemented using logistic regression, naïve Bayes, and the support vector machine and is trained on a created dataset consisting of 3000 normal, negative, and unstructured commands. The simulation results show that the IRON system can determine 90% of the device’s names for all commands. Moreover, the IRON correctly classifies 100% of the commands as positive or negative within approximately 30 s. Full article
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16 pages, 2656 KiB  
Article
Open Data Insights from a Smart Bridge Datathon: A Multi-Stakeholder Observation of Smart City Open Data in Practice
by Sage Cammers-Goodwin
Smart Cities 2023, 6(2), 676-691; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities6020032 - 21 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1747
Abstract
“Open Data” efforts are growing, especially in Europe, where open data are seen as a possible ethical driver of innovation. As smart cities continue to develop, it is important to explore how open data will affect the stakeholders of smart public spaces. Making [...] Read more.
“Open Data” efforts are growing, especially in Europe, where open data are seen as a possible ethical driver of innovation. As smart cities continue to develop, it is important to explore how open data will affect the stakeholders of smart public spaces. Making data open and accessible not only has a managerial and technical component but also creates opportunities to shift power dynamics by granting individuals (and entities) access to data they might not otherwise be able to obtain. The scope of those who could access these data is wide, including data-illiterate citizens, burgeoning startups, and foreign militaries. This paper details the process of making data “open” from the MX3D smart bridge in Amsterdam through a “datathon”. The development and outcomes of opening the data and the event itself bring us closer to understanding the complexity of open data access and the extent to which it is useful or empowering for members of the public. While open data research continues to expand, there is still a dearth of studies that qualitatively detail the process and stakeholder concerns for a modern smart city project. This article serves to fill this gap. Full article
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