Special Issue "Sustainable Design for Seawater Desalination"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and Wastewater Treatment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. E. Eric Adams
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 48-216B, 15 Vassar St. (for overnight deliveries only), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Interests: Environmental fluid mechanics; dynamics of jets and plumes; water quality modeling
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Adrian Wing-Keung Law
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Singapore
Interests: Environmental hydraulics; coastal engineering; environmental technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Seawater desalination, either through thermal (e.g., multistage flash) or membrane (e.g., reverse osmosis) processes, has become an increasingly important contributor to the world’s freshwater supply. This is true not only for arid regions of the world such as the Middle East and North Africa, but also for semi-arid regions in which the water demand from burgeoning coastal cities has exceeded the sustainable yield under climate changes.

Desalination involves potential environmental impacts. Typical direct impacts include the entrainment and impingement of marine organisms into offshore intakes, or the exposure of organisms to constituents that have been concentrated (e.g., salt) or added through the desalination process (e.g., trace metals or waste heat). So far, many sustainable design features have been successfully developed and implemented to mitigate these impacts. For example, adopting submerged brine outfalls with multiple high-velocity discharge ports at an inclination help reduce the impact concentration, as well as combining brine with other effluents (e.g. wastewater). The use of subsurface seawater intakes and discharge wells can also provide a buffer from the ocean. Yet, ongoing concerns remain in different areas, for example, the direct impacts of mechanical stresses to marine organisms due to the discharges and modifications to the groundwater flow due to subsurface intakes, and the indirect impacts due to increased energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions caused by the power generation needed for the reverse osmosis (RO) processes. There are ongoing efforts for further improvement, for example reducing brine volume or concentration using novel technology to improve freshwater or energy recovery such as pressure-retarded osmosis, reverse or forward electrodialysis, and ion-concentration polarization.

In this Special Issue, we welcome original research, case studies, and review articles pertaining to these and related topics towards the sustainable design for seawater desalination facilities.

Dr. E. Eric Adams
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Adrian Wing-Keung Law
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Seawater
  • Desalination
  • Impingement
  • Entrainment
  • Ocean outfall
  • Salinity
  • Thermal stress
  • Mechanical stress
  • Subsurface intake
  • Intake gallery
  • Multiport diffuser

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Assessment of the Requirements within the Environmental Monitoring Plans Used to Evaluate the Environmental Impacts of Desalination Plants in Chile
Water 2019, 11(10), 2085; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102085 - 06 Oct 2019
Abstract
Seawater desalination represents an alternative solution to face the challenge of water scarcity in Chile. However, the uncertainty toward potential environmental impacts of desalination plants represent a barrier to achieving water sustainability and socioeconomic development in Chile. This study aimed to assess the [...] Read more.
Seawater desalination represents an alternative solution to face the challenge of water scarcity in Chile. However, the uncertainty toward potential environmental impacts of desalination plants represent a barrier to achieving water sustainability and socioeconomic development in Chile. This study aimed to assess the quality of environmental monitoring plans (EMP) and determine the aspects to be improved within it, in order to enhance the management of desalination plants during the operation phase and guarantee a sustainable development of the activity. The Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) and Environmental Impact Studies for seawater desalination projects published in the Environmental Impact Evaluation System (SEIA) in Chile between 1997 and 2018 were reviewed. The results of the brine production from desalination plants showed a significant increase in the last decade (about 1.6 Mm3 per year estimated according to the projects approved or under implementation). The EMPs data show heterogeneity and increasing requirements over time, which can be attributed to the governmental effort to improve environmental protection. Furthermore, a high frequency of irrelevant descriptors was identified in the current EMPs. The study thus recommended standardizing the environmental requirements included in EMPs based on empiric scientific knowledge to enhance the environmental protection programs in Chile. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Design for Seawater Desalination)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Numerical Modeling of Multiple Inclined Dense Jets Discharged from Moderately Spaced Ports
Water 2019, 11(10), 2077; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102077 - 05 Oct 2019
Abstract
Wastewaters are often discharged into water bodies from multiport diffusers in the form of inclined dense jets, and it is important to predict their mixing characteristics for a sound sustainable design for seawater desalination. Compared with single jets and multiple horizontal or vertical [...] Read more.
Wastewaters are often discharged into water bodies from multiport diffusers in the form of inclined dense jets, and it is important to predict their mixing characteristics for a sound sustainable design for seawater desalination. Compared with single jets and multiple horizontal or vertical jets, the mixing processes of multiple inclined dense jets are more complicated, and thus the existing theoretical, analytical, or simplified numerical methods cannot effectively predict their dilution properties. Recent advances in numerical modeling techniques have provided a new avenue of simulating wastewater jets as three-dimensional phenomena, but their application to multiple inclined dense jets has rarely been reported. In this study, a fully three-dimensional numerical model is employed to simulate multiple inclined brine discharges from diffusers with moderately spaced ports, with the standard and re-normalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulence closures being tested. The simulated characteristic variables are compared to experimental data, and the results show that the simulations match very well with the experiments, demonstrating that the numerical model is a promising tool for simulating inclined dense jets discharged from multiport diffusers. The study also found that the RNG k-ε model performs better than the standard k-ε model without significantly increasing the computational costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Design for Seawater Desalination)
Back to TopTop