Special Issue "Studies on River Training"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology and Hydrogeology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Erik Mosselman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Delft University of Technology and Deltares
Interests: river engineering; fluvial morphodynamics; river restoration; nature-based solutions; flood risk management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Water will present and review the latest insights, innovations, and experiences in river training, focusing on four specific areas. The first area regards the functioning of innovative river training structures, such as permeable groynes, bottom vanes, surface screens, porcupines, and longitudinal training dams. The second area relates to the adverse effects of river training, often only becoming manifest and creating full awareness of their existence in the long term. This awareness of adverse effects is now leading to more adaptive approaches to stabilizing river courses, protecting riverbanks, improving navigability, and providing safety against flooding. The third focus area concerns the advanced theory and modeling of hydrodynamics and morphodynamics to predict effectiveness and to assess the impacts of river training. The fourth area is about case studies to evaluate the long-term performance and sustainability of river training projects implemented in the past. The Guest Editor welcomes papers on river training that address one or more of these focus areas. The ultimate goal is to produce a high-quality state-of-the-art for river scientists, as well as guidance for practicing river engineers.

Dr. Erik Mosselman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • River training
  • Bank protection
  • River restoration
  • Fluvial morphodynamics

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Studies on River Training
Water 2020, 12(11), 3100; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113100 - 04 Nov 2020
Viewed by 780
Abstract
This editorial regards a Special Issue of Water on river training. It introduces five papers in a framework of history, fundamentals, case studies and future. Four papers result from decades of experience with innovation, planning, design and implementation of river training works on [...] Read more.
This editorial regards a Special Issue of Water on river training. It introduces five papers in a framework of history, fundamentals, case studies and future. Four papers result from decades of experience with innovation, planning, design and implementation of river training works on rivers in Colombia, the Rhine branches in the Netherlands and the Brahmaputra-Jamuna River in Bangladesh. A fifth paper reviews the state-of-the-art in predicting and influencing the formation and behavior of river bars. The editorial argues that the future lies in more flexible river training, using a mix of innovative permanent structures and recurrent interventions such as dredging, sediment nourishment, vegetation management and low-cost temporary structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Studies on River Training)
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Research

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Article
A Century of Riverbank Protection and River Training in Bangladesh
Water 2020, 12(11), 3018; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113018 - 27 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1072
Abstract
Protecting against riverbank erosion along the world’s largest rivers is challenging. The Bangladesh Delta, bisected by the Brahmaputra River (also called the Jamuna River), is rife with complexity. Here, an emerging middle-income country with the world’s highest population density coexists with the world’s [...] Read more.
Protecting against riverbank erosion along the world’s largest rivers is challenging. The Bangladesh Delta, bisected by the Brahmaputra River (also called the Jamuna River), is rife with complexity. Here, an emerging middle-income country with the world’s highest population density coexists with the world’s most unpredictable and largest braided, sand-bed river. Bangladesh has struggled over decades to protect against the onslaught of a continuously widening river corridor. Many of the principles implemented successfully in other parts of the world failed in Bangladesh. To this end, Bangladesh embarked on intensive knowledge-based developments and piloted new technologies. After two decades, successful, sustainable, low-cost riverbank protection technology was developed, suitable for the challenging river conditions. It was necessary to accept that no construction is permanent in this morphologically dynamic environment. What was initially born out of fund shortages became a cost-effective, systematic and adaptive approach to riverbank protection using improved knowledge, new materials, and new techniques, in the form of geobag revetments. This article provides an overview of the challenges faced when attempting to stabilize the riverbanks of the mighty rivers of Bangladesh. An overview of the construction of the major bridge crossings as well as riverbank protection schemes is detailed. Finally, a summary of lessons learned concludes the impressive progress made. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Studies on River Training)
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Article
Towards Sustainable River Management of the Dutch Rhine River
Water 2020, 12(6), 1827; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061827 - 26 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1359
Abstract
Two thousand years of human interventions has heavily modified the Dutch Rhine river. Situated in a densely populated and developed delta, the river and its infrastructure fulfil important societal functions: safety against flooding, inland waterways, nature, freshwater supply, and agriculture. Programs to improve [...] Read more.
Two thousand years of human interventions has heavily modified the Dutch Rhine river. Situated in a densely populated and developed delta, the river and its infrastructure fulfil important societal functions: safety against flooding, inland waterways, nature, freshwater supply, and agriculture. Programs to improve individual functions increasingly lead to conflicts with other functions and therefore call for an integrated approach. This paper reviews the history of the Dutch Rhine and documents the sectoral improvement programs in recent decades, explaining adverse effects such as the large-scale bed degradation at rates of up to 4 cm per year. The lessons from the past are used to propose avenues for future integrated and sustainable river training and river management, arguing that mitigating adverse effects while maintaining societal functions requires a combination of recurrent sediment management measures and extensive structural measures that may change the layout of the river system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Studies on River Training)
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Article
Submerged Vane Technology in Colombia: Five Representative Projects
Water 2020, 12(4), 984; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12040984 - 31 Mar 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 818
Abstract
An innovative research-based technology has been applied for the first time in Colombia to improve the navigability of the Magdalena river in a zone of the city of Barrancabermeja, Department of Santander. The result of installation of the submerged vane technology demonstrated its [...] Read more.
An innovative research-based technology has been applied for the first time in Colombia to improve the navigability of the Magdalena river in a zone of the city of Barrancabermeja, Department of Santander. The result of installation of the submerged vane technology demonstrated its effectiveness in sediment management and motivated its further use as a solution to problems of erosion, scour and meander evolution, which are common occurrence in the rivers of the country. Since this 1991 installation, more than 18 projects have been completed and the technical effectiveness of the system has been improved. Compared to traditional solutions, the results demonstrate beneficial economic impacts due to shorter execution times, reduction in annual maintenance costs, and diminished environmental impacts. Characteristics of design and construction and results obtained from five projects are described that are representative of the diversity of conditions and difficulties for the application of this technology in Colombia. Lessons learned for adaptation by river management authorities are derived from the study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Studies on River Training)
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Review

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Review
An Integrated Review of River Bars for Engineering, Management and Transdisciplinary Research
Water 2020, 12(2), 596; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12020596 - 21 Feb 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1337
Abstract
River training and river restoration often imply modifying the patterns and dimensions of bars, channels, and pools. Research since the 1980s has greatly advanced and matured our knowledge on the formation and behavior of river bars, thanks to field work, laboratory experiments, theoretical [...] Read more.
River training and river restoration often imply modifying the patterns and dimensions of bars, channels, and pools. Research since the 1980s has greatly advanced and matured our knowledge on the formation and behavior of river bars, thanks to field work, laboratory experiments, theoretical analyses, and numerical modelling by several research groups. However, this knowledge is not easily accessible to design engineers, river managers, and ecologists who need to apply it. This is mainly due to confusing differences in terminology as well as to difficult mathematical theories. Moreover, existing scientific publications generally focus on specific aspects, so an overall review of the findings and their applications is still lacking. In many cases, the knowledge achieved so far would allow minimizing hard engineering interventions and thus obtaining more natural rivers. We present an integrated review of the major findings of river bar studies. Our aim is to provide accessible state-of-the-art knowledge for nature-based bar management and successful river training and river restoration. To this end we review the results from analytical, numerical, experimental, and field studies, explain the background of bar theories, and discuss applications in river engineering and river restoration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Studies on River Training)
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Other

Case Report
Bank Protection Structures along the Brahmaputra-Jamuna River, a Study of Flow Slides
Water 2020, 12(9), 2588; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12092588 - 16 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 739
Abstract
The planform of the Brahmaputra-Jamuna River followed its natural path in Bangladesh until the construction of bank protection works started to save Sirajganj from bank erosion since the 1930s. Several so-called hardpoints such as groynes and revetments were constructed in the period 1980–2015 [...] Read more.
The planform of the Brahmaputra-Jamuna River followed its natural path in Bangladesh until the construction of bank protection works started to save Sirajganj from bank erosion since the 1930s. Several so-called hardpoints such as groynes and revetments were constructed in the period 1980–2015 and the Jamuna Multipurpose Bridge was opened in 1998. The Brahmaputra Right Embankment and other projects had saved the western flood plain from inundation during monsoon floods. These river training works experienced severe damage by geotechnical failures, mostly flow slides. A flow slide is an underwater slope failure because of liquefaction or a breaching process in the subsoil or a combination of both. The design of most of these training works did not consider the risk of damage by flow slides. All descriptions of the observed damages show that scour phenomena in the channel close to a river training work are a cause of flow slides, besides pore water outflow. The research question was: how can the design of river training works be improved to reduce the risk of damage by flow slides? The main part of the investigation was focussed on reducing local scour holes near river training works. The most promising results are river training works with gentle bank slopes, permeable groynes, bed protections in dredged trenches with gentle side slopes, and methods to increase locally the bearing capacity of the subsoil. It is recommended to increase the knowledge of the failure mechanisms in the Brahmaputra-Jamuna River by improved monitoring in the field, the setup of a database with descriptions of all observed flow slides and the circumstances in which they occur. In addition to these recommendations, a field test facility is proposed to verify the knowledge of the failure mechanisms in that river. These activities will optimise the design of new river training structures with a very low risk of damages by flow slides and geotechnical instabilities and they will contribute to an improvement of the current design guidelines for river training structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Studies on River Training)
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