Special Issue "GIS Application: Flood Risk Management"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology and Hydrogeology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 9 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Christophe Viavattene
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Guest Editor
Middlesex university, London, United Kingdom
Interests: GIS; water resources management; flood; surface water; groundwater; extreme events; environment
Prof. Damien Serre
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Guest Editor
Université de la Polynésie Française, UMR 241 EIO, B.P. 6570, 98702 Faa’a - Tahiti, Polynésie Française
Interests: civil engineering; rivers; urbanism; urban development; geographic information system; environment; spatial analysis; environmental impact assessment; city planning; urban sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last decades thanks to technological progress and the explosion of digital data and of geo-services, Geographic Information System (GIS) application has become central to supporting individuals, communities, businesses and public authorities decisions and communications in many domains. As such, GIS applications provide effective and powerful flood risk communication and decision support tools. However, the quality of geographic data to support flood risk assessment remains a challenge. This is particularly the case when assessing the exposure, vulnerability and resilience and when data is used to  appraise flood risk management options and to support emergency services decision-making.

For this special issue of Water we seek papers discussing flood risk assessment with an emphasis on data geoprocessing, on the development of tailored risk indicators or for innovative communication tools involving web-mapping. This special issue will highlight discussions on how geographic data and GIS applications can and should inform and support flood risk management. The special issue is open to any geographic scale or spatial resolution.

Dr. Christophe Viavattene
Prof. Damien Serre
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Geographic Information System
  • flood risk management
  • flood impacts
  • geodata
  • geoprocessing
  • webmapping
  • decision
  • communication

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Population Exposure to Urban Flood at the Building Scale
Water 2020, 12(11), 3253; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113253 - 20 Nov 2020
Abstract
The assessment of populations affected by urban flooding is crucial for flood prevention and mitigation but is highly influenced by the accuracy of population datasets. The population distribution is related to buildings during the urban floods, so assessing the population at the building [...] Read more.
The assessment of populations affected by urban flooding is crucial for flood prevention and mitigation but is highly influenced by the accuracy of population datasets. The population distribution is related to buildings during the urban floods, so assessing the population at the building scale is more rational for the urban floods, which is possible due to the abundance of multi-source data and advances in GIS technology. Therefore, this study assesses the populations affected by urban floods through population mapping at the building scale using highly correlated point of interest (POI) data. The population distribution is first mapped by downscaling the grid-based WorldPop population data to the building scale. Then, the population affected by urban floods is estimated by superimposing the population data sets onto flood areas, with flooding simulated by the LISFLOOD-FP hydrodynamic model. Finally, the proposed method is applied to Lishui City in southeast China. The results show that the population affected by urban floods is significantly reduced for different rainstorm scenarios when using the building-scale population instead of WorldPop. In certain areas, populations not captured by WorldPop can be identified using the building-scale population. This study provides a new method for estimating populations affected by urban flooding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS Application: Flood Risk Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Vehicle-Related Flood Fatalities in Texas, 1959–2019
Water 2020, 12(10), 2884; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102884 - 16 Oct 2020
Abstract
Texas has the highest number of flood fatalities and vehicle-related flood fatalities in the United States. This study provides a detailed analysis of vehicle-related flood fatalities in Texas from 1959 to 2019. The data was compiled from the Storm Data publication maintained by [...] Read more.
Texas has the highest number of flood fatalities and vehicle-related flood fatalities in the United States. This study provides a detailed analysis of vehicle-related flood fatalities in Texas from 1959 to 2019. The data was compiled from the Storm Data publication maintained by the National Weather Service and includes demographics of the victims, dates, flood types, roadway types, and fatality location. There were 570 vehicle-related flood fatalities during the study period, with almost all fatal accidents resulting in one fatality. These fatalities represent 58% of total flood fatalities. The spatial analysis reveals that most counties with high vehicle-related flood fatalities are clustered in Flash Flood Alley. These counties accounted for over 80% of the fatalities. The annual distribution of these fatalities follows a statistically significant decreasing trend. Monthly distribution of vehicle-related fatalities follows that of rainfall in the Flash Flood Alley, with flash floods causing 61% of all vehicle-related flood fatalities. Night was the time of the day when the most vehicle-related deaths occurred. Males accounted for 63% of the fatalities and the age group of 20–29 was the most affected. The study discusses how the results can be used to increase awareness of flood hazards, used as input into state and regional disaster mitigation plans, and help tailor education and outreach programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS Application: Flood Risk Management)
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