Special Issue "Environmental Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements in Contaminated Soils and Water"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (21 June 2021) | Viewed by 5198

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Mikael Motelica-Heino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ISTO UMR 7327 CNRS, University of Orléans, Orléans, France
Interests: trace metals; environmental biogeochemistry and mineralogy; ecodynamic of contaminants; ecological restoration
Prof. Dr. Philippe Le Coustumer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bordeaux Imaging Center, PIE, CGFB, UMS3420 CNRS-Université-US4 INSERM, 146 rue L. Saignant, CS 61292, 33076 Bordeaux cedex, France
Interests: nanoparticles; colloids; TEM; trace metals; remediation; continental water; soils; emergent contaminants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Fabrice Muller
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ISTO UMR 7327 CNRS, University of Orléans, Orléans, France
Interests: physico-chemistry; environmental mineralogy; water treatement

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of indusial societies has led to the extensive and intensive use of metals, but also to widespread pollution. Understanding the transfer, accumulation, and fate of potentially toxic trace elements in the natural environment is necessary in order to assess the risks to ecosystems and human health. Unlike organic compounds that can be brought back to their base elements by combustion, these elements do not get eliminated; they change their chemical form and are always susceptible to remobilization in the environment by natural transformation mechanisms.

In a context of ecological risk assessment, natural environment management, and sustainable development, it is essential to acquire knowledge about the fate of metals in these different abiotic and biotic compartments of soils and water, and to define the mechanisms that condition their transfer; their bioaccumulation capacities; and, ultimately, their toxic and ecotoxicological effects on the different biological levels of integration. Indeed, knowledge of the physical and chemical form of metals, of natural or anthropogenic origin, is essential in order to understand the mechanisms of transfer and accumulation by living organisms. This parameter results from interactions between solutes, mineral surfaces, and organic and biological substances. In addition, the role of the biological component (macro-organisms, micro-organisms, and rhizosphere) in the biogeochemical cycling of these elements has hardly been explored. To answer these questions, it is necessary to characterize the processes that take place at the interfaces between minerals and solution, organisms and solutions, and so on. Their behavior depends on many physical, chemical, and biological processes. The aim is to understand the respective role and the coupling of abiotic and microbiological processes, as well as the role of macro-organisms in their (im) mobilization.

Prof. Dr. Mikael Motelica-Heino
Prof. Dr. Philippe Le Coustumer
Prof. Dr. Fabrice Muller
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • potentially toxic trace elements
  • metal(oid)s
  • soils
  • water
  • sediment
  • colloids
  • biogeochemistry
  • micro-organisms
  • redox
  • organic matter
  • minerals
  • bioturbation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Evaluation of the Ecological Potential of Microorganisms for Purifying Water with High Iron Content
Water 2021, 13(7), 901; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13070901 - 26 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 943
Abstract
The ability of a number of microorganisms isolated from highly magnetic soil of the city Mednogorsk to oxidize Fe (II) under conditions of periodic cultivation in a liquid medium was studied. Among the studied microorganisms, two microbial isolates with maximum growth characteristics and [...] Read more.
The ability of a number of microorganisms isolated from highly magnetic soil of the city Mednogorsk to oxidize Fe (II) under conditions of periodic cultivation in a liquid medium was studied. Among the studied microorganisms, two microbial isolates with maximum growth characteristics and iron-oxidizing activity were selected and identified: Bacillus megaterium 69.3 and B. megaterium 69.5. Individual levels of metal resistance of the isolates were determined: maximum tolerated concentration (MTC) for Fe (II) of the isolates B. megaterium 69.3 and B. megaterium 69.5 was 1200 mg L−1, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 1800 mg L−1. Both microbial isolates actively oxidized Fe (II) by reducing its high concentration in the medium (1.19 g L−1) by 33 and 39% during 14 days of culturing. Total increase in the biomass of B. megaterium 69.3 and B. megaterium 69.5 after 14 days of culturing was 15.3 and 14.7 g L−1; the active parts of the biomass increased 8.7- and 6.9-fold compared to the inoculum dose, respectively. These microbial isolates could be used in future in the biotechnological process of water purification with increased/high levels of Fe (II). Full article
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Article
Comparing Trace Elements (As, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in Soils and Surface Waters among Montane, Upland Watersheds and Lowland, Urban Watersheds in New England, USA
Water 2021, 13(1), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13010059 - 30 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 957
Abstract
Trace element biogeochemistry from soils to rivers is important for toxicity to aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to determine whether trace element exports in contrasting watersheds are controlled by their abundance in soil, current land uses in the watershed, or [...] Read more.
Trace element biogeochemistry from soils to rivers is important for toxicity to aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to determine whether trace element exports in contrasting watersheds are controlled by their abundance in soil, current land uses in the watershed, or geologic processes. Upland soils and river water samples were collected throughout the Deerfield watershed in southern Vermont and western Massachusetts and in the Quinebaug and Shetucket watersheds of eastern Connecticut. Soil concentrations were only an important predictor for dissolved Fe export, but no other trace element. Soil pH was not correlated with normalized dissolved exports of trace elements, but DOC was correlated with normalized dissolved Pb and Ni exports. The limited spatial and depth of soil sampling may have contributed to the poor correlation. Surprisingly, linear regressions and principal component analysis showed that human development was associated with higher soil trace metal concentrations but not significantly correlated with dissolved trace elements export. Instead, forest abundance was a strong predictor for lower Cu, Pb, and Zn soil concentrations and lower As, Fe, Ni and Pb dissolved exports across the watersheds. Dissolved exports of Al, K, and Si suggest that enhanced mineral dissolution in the montane watersheds was likely an important factor for matching or exceeding normalized pollutant trace element exports in more urbanized watersheds. Further studies are needed to evaluate subsurface/hyporheic controls as well as soil–surface water interface to quantify exchange and transport. Full article
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Article
Assessment the Seasonal Variability and Enrichment of Toxic Trace Metals Pollution in Sediments of Damietta Branch, Nile River, Egypt
Water 2020, 12(12), 3359; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123359 - 30 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1393
Abstract
This work appraises the extent of toxic trace metals and seasonal pollution degree in Damietta branch sediments of the River Nile of Egypt. The toxic trace metals Fe, Mn, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were analysed in sediments from six sites [...] Read more.
This work appraises the extent of toxic trace metals and seasonal pollution degree in Damietta branch sediments of the River Nile of Egypt. The toxic trace metals Fe, Mn, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were analysed in sediments from six sites during the summer and winter seasons. The metal concentrations and organic matter were determined using inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry and loss-on-ignition, respectively. Multivariate statistical methods were used in order to allocate the possible metals sources and their relationships in sediments. The seasonal mean sequence of toxic trace metals was: Fe > Mn > Zn > Pb > Cu > Ni > Co > Cd. The mean Cd, Pb, and Zn values exceeded the sediment quality guidelines and average shale and they represent severe potential toxicity for aquatic organisms. Cu and Co were enriched during winter. The geo-accumulation index stipulated that metal pollution degree in the sequence of: Pb > Zn > Cd > Co > Cu > Mn > Ni > Fe. The highest metal pollution index reported in winter in sites S4/S5 and during summer in sites S4–S6. Different agricultural, wastewater discharge, fisheries, and industrial activities, as well as the effect of dilution/concentration during summer/winter seasons, are the main factors that contributed to metal accumulations in Damietta branch sediments. Continuous monitoring and evaluation of toxic trace metal concentrations of the Damietta sediments and similar localities worldwide can help to protect the ecosystem from harmful metal contaminations. Full article
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Article
A Study on Heavy Metals in the Surface Soil of the Region around the Qinghai Lake in Tibet Plateau: Pollution Risk Evaluation and Pollution Source Analysis
Water 2020, 12(11), 3277; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113277 - 22 Nov 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1340
Abstract
In order to reveal the pollution characteristics and sources of heavy metals in surface soil of the region around the Qinghai Lake in Tibet Plateau, improve the prevention awareness and measures of local residents and urge the local government to implement necessary prevention [...] Read more.
In order to reveal the pollution characteristics and sources of heavy metals in surface soil of the region around the Qinghai Lake in Tibet Plateau, improve the prevention awareness and measures of local residents and urge the local government to implement necessary prevention and control measures, nine heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the surface soil samples of the region around the Qinghai Lake have been collected and analyzed. The methods such as statistic method, geo-accumulation index method, Nemerow index method, potential ecological risk index method, human health risk evaluation method and positive matrix factor analysis model (PMF) have been used to evaluate pollution characteristics and potential risks and analyze the sources of heavy metals. The results are shown below. First, the average contents of heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil are 11.73 ± 3.78, 0.62 ± 1.40, 12.38 ± 3.68, 41.35 ± 13.01, 19.33 ± 8.92, 546.96 ± 159.28, 21.18 ± 7.04, 21.86 ± 6.61 and 63.51 ± 19.71 mg·kg−1, respectively. Compared with the background values of the soil environment in Qinghai Province, it can be seen that there is an accumulation of these heavy metals to varying degrees, which is the most serious in Cd, Co and Pb. Second, the analysis of the geo-accumulation index and Nemerow index indicates that the heavy metals in the surface soil of the region around the Qinghai Lake have reached the level of heavy pollution, mainly polluted by Cd, and the accumulation of heavy metal pollution in the north, south, southwest and southeast of the study area is more serious. Third, the results of potential ecological risk evaluation show that the study area as a whole is classified as an area with high ecological risk, and Cd contributes the most to the overall risk. In fact, the heavy metals in the soil of the study area produce no noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks to human health, and children and adults may be exposed to these risks by the mouth. Finally, the PMF results reveal that the sources of heavy metals in the study area include the sources of agricultural production, the nature, coal burning and transportation, with a contribution rate of 43.10%, 25.34%, 19.67% and 11.89%, respectively. Full article
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