Special Issue "Impact of Climate Change on Coasts and Coastal Structures"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 3755

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Panagiotis Prinos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: climate change; extreme storms; flood risk management; waves-vegetation interaction; reliability-based design and upgrading of coastal structures; turbulence; environmental flows
Dr. Panagiota Galiatsatou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Geoinformatics, Topography and Hydraulic Modelling, Department of Strategic Planning, Hydraulic Works and Development, Thessaloniki Water Supply and Sewerage Company S.A. (EYATH S.A.), 54 635 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: climate change; extreme value analysis; extreme storms; flood risk management; uncertainty analysis; probabilistic and stochastic processes; reliability-based design and upgrading of coastal structures; time series analysis and forecasting; hydraulic modelling and management of urban water and sewer networks

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

Climate change can affect coastal areas and coastal structures in a variety of ways. Coasts and coastal structures are sensitive to sea level rise, changes in the frequency and intensity of storms, and increases in precipitation.

The impacts of climate change are likely to affect considerably vulnerable coastal areas and structures. Confronting existing challenges that affect man-made infrastructure and coastal ecosystems, such as shoreline erosion, coastal flooding, and water pollution, is already a concern in many areas. Addressing the additional stress of climate change may require new approaches to integrated coastal zone management.

The Special Issue aims to provide an overview of the recent approaches and trends in assessing climate change impacts on coastal areas and coastal structures. Topics will concern new findings and developments in modeling extreme coastal storms; waves and storm surges in a changing climate; coastal flooding and erosion risks under climate change; the effects of climate change on coastal biodiversity and habitats; the design and upgrading of coastal structures in a variable climate; the vulnerability, resilience, and sustainability of coastal areas under climate change; and adaptation strategies in coastal zone management.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Coastal flooding and coastal erosion in a changing climate;
  • Effects of climate change on coastal biodiversity and habitats;
  • Extreme coastal storms and waves in a changing climate;
  • Design and upgrading of coastal structures accounting for climate change effects;
  • Climate change risk and adaptation;
  • Extreme value analysis in a variable coastal environment;
  • Risk analysis, resilience, and sustainability under climate change.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Panagiotis Prinos
Dr. Panagiota Galiatsatou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change risks and adaptation
  • coastal flooding and erosion
  • coastal biodiversity and habitats
  • extreme storms and waves
  • stability and overtopping of coastal structures
  • resilience and sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Accounting for Climate Change in Extreme Sea Level Estimation
Water 2022, 14(19), 2956; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14192956 - 21 Sep 2022
Viewed by 333
Abstract
Extreme sea level estimates are fundamental for mitigating coastal flooding as they provide insight for defence engineering. As the global climate changes, rising sea levels combined with increases in storm intensity and frequency pose an increasing risk to coastline communities. We present a [...] Read more.
Extreme sea level estimates are fundamental for mitigating coastal flooding as they provide insight for defence engineering. As the global climate changes, rising sea levels combined with increases in storm intensity and frequency pose an increasing risk to coastline communities. We present a new method for estimating extreme sea levels that accounts for the effects of climate change on extreme events that are not accounted for by mean sea level trends. We follow a joint probabilities methodology, considering skew surge and peak tides as the only components of sea levels. We model extreme skew surges using a non-stationary generalised Pareto distribution (GPD) with covariates accounting for climate change, seasonality and skew surge–peak tide interaction. We develop methods to efficiently test for extreme skew surge trends across different coastlines and seasons. We illustrate our methods using data from four UK tide gauges and estimate sea level return levels when accounting for these long-term trends. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Climate Change on Coasts and Coastal Structures)
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Review

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Review
Coastal Structures as Beach Erosion Control and Sea Level Rise Adaptation in Malaysia: A Review
Water 2021, 13(13), 1741; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131741 - 23 Jun 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2780
Abstract
The shoreline of Malaysia is exposed to threats of coastal erosion and a rise of sea level. The National Coastal Erosion Study, 2015 reported that 15% of an 8840 km shoreline is currently eroding, where one-third of those falls under the critical and [...] Read more.
The shoreline of Malaysia is exposed to threats of coastal erosion and a rise of sea level. The National Coastal Erosion Study, 2015 reported that 15% of an 8840 km shoreline is currently eroding, where one-third of those falls under the critical and significant categories that require structural protection. The Study of Sea Level Rise in Malaysia, 2017 presented a sea-level increase of 0.67–0.74 mm on average yearly. This study reviewed selected coastal protection structures along the shoreline of Malaysia as an erosion control and sea-level rise adaptation based on coastal management strategies. Hard structures such as rock revetment and breakwater are commonly used as erosion protection systems in the “hold the line” strategy. Increased platform level of seawalls and earth bunds, considered as an “adaptation” approach, are effective in erosion protection and are adaptive to sea-level rise. Mangrove replanting is suitable as a “limited intervention” approach in minimizing the long-term impact of both threats. However, offshore breakwater, groyne, and geotextile tubes are solely for protection purposes and are not as effective for sea-level rise adaptation. As the sea level is continuously increasing, their function as coastal protection will also become less effective. In summary, this comprehensive review on coastal protection in Malaysia will benefit the related agencies on the future assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Climate Change on Coasts and Coastal Structures)
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