Water-Soil Interactions: Biogeochemical Cycles of Nitrate and Soil Monitoring

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Water".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 8947

Special Issue Editors


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Institute of Industrial and Forage Crops Hellenic Agricultural Organization General Directorship of Agricultural Research 1, Theofrastou str., 41335 Larissa, Greece
Interests: soil mapping; classification and evaluation; soil fertility; soil and water pollution; precision agriculture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Industrial and Forage Crops Hellenic Agricultural Organization General Directorship of Agricultural Research 1, Theofrastou str., 41335 Larissa, Greece
Interests: soil quality; precision agriculture; soil and water pollution
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nitrogen is the most abundant element on the planet, covering 78% of the atmosphere, with great importance for life as it is an essential component of DNA and proteins or enzymes and a key nutrient of plants participating in the fundamental reaction of plant life i.e. in photosynthesis. Nevertheless, atmospheric nitrogen is not available to most organisms and in order to be used by them, it must be converted to reactive compounds (e.g. the oxidizing forms NO3-NO2- and the reducing forms of NH3 and NH4 +). N of the atmosphere can be bound by natural processes, through lightning, and by biological fixation to terrestrial and aquatic systems. However, the quantities bound by these processes, are not adequate for the demands of the ecosystems, which are supplemented by reactive forms of N that can be produced in unlimited quantities after the discovery of the Haber-Bosch process that allows the conversion of N2 to NH3/NH4 on an industrial scale (Denk et al., 2017). Nitrate is the most important form of soil N for plants, agricultural production, environment, and human health, positively or negatively, entering their body through the food chain (Tsadilas, 2022). The N cycle includes a number of compounds converted by plants and microorganisms. Among these intermediate forms is NO3- which, in addition to their importance for agricultural production, can create serious problems in the environment, endangering biodiversity and climate. Therefore, the processes controlling the conversions of N in the soil are of particular importance as well as monitoring them through the techniques and methods that have been developed up to date. These two main purposes, biogeochemical processes governing N transformations in soils and their monitoring in the soil are the subjects of this special issue.

Denk, T.R.A., Mohn, J.  Decock, C., Lewicka-Szczebak, D., Harris, E., Butterbach-Bahl, K.,   Kiese, R., Wolf, R. 2017. The nitrogen cycle: A review of isotope effects and isotope modeling approaches. Soil Biology and Biogeochemistry. 105: 121-137.

Tsadilas, C. (Ed.). 2022. Nitrate Handbook Environmental, Agricultural, and Health Effects. CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, pp. 444.

Dr. Christos Tsadilas
Dr. Eleftherios Evangelou
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • nitrate
  • nitrites
  • ammonium
  • nitrogen cycle
  • nitrogen fixation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1099 KiB  
Article
Methods of Urea Fertilizer Application Influence Growth, Yield, and Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Transplanted Aman Rice
by Alpina Akter, Mohammad Rafiqul Islam, M. Rafiqul Islam, Md. Ahidul Islam, Samia Lutfa Hasan, Shihab Uddin and Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman
Water 2022, 14(21), 3539; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14213539 - 4 Nov 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 8599
Abstract
Although urea placed deep reduces nitrogen (N) loss and increases rice yield, its use is not expanding due to the lack of effective application methods. A study was carried out to determine how different urea application techniques affected the yield and nitrogen use [...] Read more.
Although urea placed deep reduces nitrogen (N) loss and increases rice yield, its use is not expanding due to the lack of effective application methods. A study was carried out to determine how different urea application techniques affected the yield and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) of transplanted Aman rice (cv. BRRI dhan46). The experiment was set up in a RCBD design with seven treatments: T1 (deep placement of urea briquettes (DPUB) by hand), T2 (DPUB by battery-powered applicator), T3 (deep placement of prilled urea (PU) briquettes by BRRI applicator), T4 (DPUB by injector applicator), T5 (DPUB by push-type applicator), T6 (broadcast application of PU), T7 (zero-N), and three replications. Findings showed that the NH4+-N concentration in field water peaked on day 3 and then rapidly fell as time passed, while the NO3-N concentration in the water and soil was minimal. T1 reported the highest grain yield, total N content and uptake, whereas T7 had the lowest values. On T1, the apparent N recovery reached its highest level (73.5%). The NUE varied from 13.26% in T3 to 29.38% in T1. Based on this finding, deep placement of urea briquette by hand is recommended for increasing the yield and NUE of T. Aman rice. Full article
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