Special Issue "The Impact of Climate Change and Human Activities on Aquatic Environments"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Hong Yang
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AB, UK
Interests: water pollution; eutrophication; biogeochemical cycle; acidification; emerging pollutants (microplastic); water–energy–carbon nexus; water resource management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Precious water resources have increasingly been affected by climate change and human activities. Increasing water temperatures in many areas have triggered widespread algae bloom, as well as the related water pollution. Extreme weather, for example more frequent droughts and floods, have brought more challenges to a lot of fragile water ecosystem. In many areas, human activities, including the industrial, agricultural, and domestic sectors, have exacerbated water shortages and contamination, as a result of insufficient water monitoring and regulation. Recently, much research has been devoted to conducting field studies and developing new models to simulate the impact of climate change and anthropogenic activities on water environments, in order to understand the complex dynamics under various scenarios.

This Special Issue welcomes articles dedicated to all aspects of the impact of climate change and human activities on aquatic ecosystems. Papers on field studies may focus on, but are not limited to, eutrophication, biogeochemical cycles, acidification, and emerging pollutants (e.g., microplastic) in the aquatic environment. Articles on modeling may include, but are not limited to, developing new models or applying current models to research water quality or water cycles.

Dr. Hong Yang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water pollution
  • climate change
  • extreme weather
  • flood
  • eutrophication
  • biogeochemical cycle
  • human activities

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Spatiotemporal Variation in Precipitation during Rainy Season in Beibu Gulf, South China, from 1961 to 2016
Water 2020, 12(4), 1170; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041170 - 19 Apr 2020
Abstract
The spatiotemporal variation in precipitation is an important part of water cycle change, which is directly associated with the atmospheric environment and climate change. The high-resolution spatiotemporal change of precipitation is still unknown in many areas despite its importance. This study analyzed the [...] Read more.
The spatiotemporal variation in precipitation is an important part of water cycle change, which is directly associated with the atmospheric environment and climate change. The high-resolution spatiotemporal change of precipitation is still unknown in many areas despite its importance. This study analyzed the spatiotemporal variation in precipitation in Beibu Gulf, South China, during the rainy season (from April to September) in the period of 1961–2016. The precipitation data were collected from 12 national standard rain-gauge observation stations. The spatiotemporal variation in precipitation was evaluated with incidence rate and contribution rate of precipitation. The tendency of variations was analyzed using the Mann–Kendall method. The precipitation in the rainy season contributed 80% to the total annual precipitation. In general, there was an exponential decreasing tendency between the precipitation incidence rate and increased precipitation durations. The corresponding contribution rate showed a downward trend after an initial increase. The precipitation incidence rate decreased with the rising precipitation grades, with a gradual increase in contribution rate. The precipitation incidence rate and contribution rate of 7–9 d durations showed the significant downward trends that passed the 95% level of significance test. The results provide a new understanding of precipitation change in the last five decades, which is valuable for predicting future climate change and extreme weather prevention and mitigation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Spatial Variation in Aragonite Saturation State and the Influencing Factors in Jiaozhou Bay, China
Water 2020, 12(3), 825; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12030825 - 14 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Both natural processes and human activities affect seawater calcium carbonate saturation state (Ωarag), while the mechanisms are still far from being clearly understood. This study analysed the seawater surface Ωarag during summer and winter in Jiaozhou Bay (JZB), China, based [...] Read more.
Both natural processes and human activities affect seawater calcium carbonate saturation state (Ωarag), while the mechanisms are still far from being clearly understood. This study analysed the seawater surface Ωarag during summer and winter in Jiaozhou Bay (JZB), China, based on two cruises observations performed in January and June 2017. The ranges of Ωarag values were 1.55~2.92 in summer and 1.62~2.15 in winter. Regression analyses were conducted to identify the drivers of the change of Ωarag distribution, and then the relative contributions of temperature, mixing processes and biological processes to the spatial differences in Ωarag were evaluated by introducing the difference between total alkalinity (TA) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as a proxy for Ωarag. The results showed that biological processes were the main factor affecting the spatial differences in Ωarag, with relative contributions of 70% in summer and 50% in winter. The contributions of temperature (25% in summer and 20% in winter) and the mixing processes (5% in summer and 30% in winter) were lower. The increasing urbanization in offshore areas can further worsen acidification, therefore environmental protection in both offshore and onshore is needed. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

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Thanks for your kind invitation for the special issue on this topic, which is very interesting and timely for the current reseach agenda and environmental protection demand. I will encourage my research group/colleagues to contribute 1 or 2 papers.

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