Special Issue "Effect of Soil Erosion on the Water Environment"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Water".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 2640

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Aleksey Sidorchuk
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geographical Faculty, Moscow State University, Russia
Interests: fluvial geomorphology; erosion modelling; palaeohydrology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soil erosion of all types is linked with the water environment in the process of sediment mobilization and delivery to water bodies, as well as associated processes of sediment transport and the deposition of sediments and particulate matter in water bodies of all types, channels, ponds, reservoirs, and coastal zones. In the same context, the concept of water environment includes water quality aspects, associated with the concentration of sediments, mobilized by erosion, as well as the influence of sediments on water bodies (mostly in terms of siltation) and on the behavior of water inhabitants. In water environments, the processes of sediment contamination with metals and radionuclides are important, as is the secondary dissolution of these contaminants. Therefore, the aims of articles and reviews in this proposed Special Issue are to describe all these aspects of the influence of sediment, mobilized by soil erosion, on water environments.

Dr. Aleksey Sidorchuk
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • sediment mobilization by erosion
  • sediment delivery
  • sediment transport and deposition
  • delivery ratio
  • sediment concentration
  • sediment contamination
  • water quality
  • behavior of water inhabitants
  • channels
  • ponds
  • reservoirs
  • coastal zones

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Ecosystem Service Assessment of Soil and Water Conservation Based on Scenario Analysis in a Hilly Red-Soil Catchment of Southern China
Water 2022, 14(8), 1284; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14081284 - 15 Apr 2022
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Abstract
Soil and water conservation (SWC) practices on agricultural watersheds have been the most effective practices for preventing soil erosion for several decades. The ecosystem services (ES) protected or enhanced by SWC practices include the comprehensive effects of protecting and conserving water sources, protecting [...] Read more.
Soil and water conservation (SWC) practices on agricultural watersheds have been the most effective practices for preventing soil erosion for several decades. The ecosystem services (ES) protected or enhanced by SWC practices include the comprehensive effects of protecting and conserving water sources, protecting and improving soil, carbon fixation, increasing agricultural production, and so on. Due to the lack of ES evaluation indicators and unified calculation methods in line with regional characteristics, this study proposes a framework of scenario analysis by using ES mapping, ES scoring, and economic analysis technology for ES and economic-benefit trade-offs under different scenarios. The study area was the Xiaoyang catchment located in Ningdu County, Jiangxi Province, which is a typically hilly red-soil region of southern China. From the results of scenario analysis, an obvious phenomenon is that some SWC practices can affect the value of some ES indicators, while some have no clear trend. By computing the ES scores for the four scenarios, the ranking was S3 (balanced), S1 (conservation), S2 (economic), and S0 (baseline). S3 ranks second in net income (with CNY 4.73 million), preceded only by S2 (CNY 6.36 million). Based on the above rankings, S3 is the relatively optimal scenario in this study. The contributions of this study are the method innovation with the localization or customized selection of ES indicators, and scenario analysis with ES scores and economic-benefit trade-offs in different scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Soil Erosion on the Water Environment)
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Article
Sediment Budgets for Small Salinized Agricultural Catchments in Southwest Australia and Implications for Phosphorus Transport
Water 2021, 13(24), 3564; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243564 - 13 Dec 2021
Viewed by 665
Abstract
Examples of sediment budgets are needed to document the range of budget types and their controls. Sediment budgets for three small agricultural catchments (7.6 to 15.6 km2) in southwestern Australia are dominated by channel and gully erosion, with sheet and rill [...] Read more.
Examples of sediment budgets are needed to document the range of budget types and their controls. Sediment budgets for three small agricultural catchments (7.6 to 15.6 km2) in southwestern Australia are dominated by channel and gully erosion, with sheet and rill erosion playing a subordinate role. Erosion was increased by clearing naturally swampy valley floors and hillslopes for agriculture and grazing, and episodic intense rainstorms. The proportion of sediment from channel and gully erosion in the sediment budget appears to be determined by the depth of alluvial fills. Dryland salinization caused by clearing native vegetation has connected hillslopes to channels across narrow floodplains, increasing the Sediment Delivery Ratio (SDR). Yield and SDR are found to be insensitive to major in-catchment changes of vegetation cover after initial clearing, the ratio of sheet and rill erosion/channel and gully erosion, and sediment storage masses. This supports the idea that yield alone is often a poor indicator of the impact of land use and land management change. Riparian vegetation would reduce sediment yield but not phosphorus yield. This study demonstrates the value of mixed methods where field observations and chemical analysis are combined with information from local people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Soil Erosion on the Water Environment)
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Article
The Slope Association Type as a Comparative Index for the Evaluation of Environmental Risks
Water 2021, 13(23), 3333; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13233333 - 24 Nov 2021
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Abstract
The topography is one of the determining site characteristics, of which the slope inclination is significant for natural science aspects, including the estimation of water erosion risk and as a criterion for agricultural subsidies. The slopes within an area vary greatly and occupy [...] Read more.
The topography is one of the determining site characteristics, of which the slope inclination is significant for natural science aspects, including the estimation of water erosion risk and as a criterion for agricultural subsidies. The slopes within an area vary greatly and occupy very different proportions of the area. Algorithms that take this heterogeneity into account were developed in the 1970s with the medium-scale agricultural site mapping (MMK). It also contains the slope association types (SAT, in German: “Hangneigungsflächentyp”), which classifies different slopes and summarizes them as one value per reference area. The SAT can be used across various scales and different targets. Applicability is given to soil and water conservation tasks, administrative tasks as field selection or agricultural subsidies, and over a wide range of scales from small catchments areas to whole landscape analyses. Thus, one value on an area basis characterizes an important topographic factor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Soil Erosion on the Water Environment)
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Article
Factors Controlling Contemporary Suspended Sediment Yield in the Caucasus Region
Water 2021, 13(22), 3173; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223173 - 10 Nov 2021
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Abstract
This paper discusses the joint impact of catchment complexity in topography, tectonics, climate, landuse patterns, and lithology on the suspended sediment yield (SSY, t km−2 year−1) in the Caucasus region using measurements from 244 gauging stations (GS). A Partial Least [...] Read more.
This paper discusses the joint impact of catchment complexity in topography, tectonics, climate, landuse patterns, and lithology on the suspended sediment yield (SSY, t km−2 year−1) in the Caucasus region using measurements from 244 gauging stations (GS). A Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) was used to reveal the relationships between SSY and explanatory variables. Despite possible significant uncertainties on the SSY values, analysis of this database indicates clear spatial patterns of SSY in the Caucasus. Most catchments in the Lesser Caucasia and Ciscaucasia are characterized by relatively low SSY values (<100–150 t km−2 year−1), the Greater Caucasus region generally have higher SSY values (more than 150–300 t km−2 year−1). Partial correlation analyses demonstrated that such proxies of topography as height above nearest drainage (HAND) and normalized steepness index (Ksn) tend to be among the most important ones. However, a PLSR analysis suggested that these variables’ influence is likely associated with peak ground acceleration (PGA). We also found a strong relationship between land cover types (e.g., barren areas and cropland) and SSY in different elevation zones. Nonetheless, adding more gauging stations into analyses and more refined characterizations of the catchments may reveal additional trends. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Soil Erosion on the Water Environment)
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