Special Issue "Water Treatment with New Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and Wastewater Treatment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Shahin Homaeigohar Website E-Mail
Nanochemistry and Nanoengineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Aalto University, Department of Chemistry & Materials Science, Kemistintie 1, C321, 00076 Aalto, Finland
Phone: +358504498715
Interests: polymer; nanomaterial; electrospinning; biomaterials; membrane; water treatment; tissue engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

While water shortage across the world is threatening, emerging advanced technologies to address this challenge are promising. In this regard, nanomaterials have played a crucial role and offered new opportunities for the construction of permeable and selective membranes and adsorbents. Such features are paramount, particularly given the limited available energy resources. In this issue, we aim to cover new researches dealing with water treatment based on nanomaterials of polymer, composite, ceramic, carbon, etc., that could be shaped in any dimensionality such as particle (0D), fiber (1D), and film (2D-3D). A particular emphasis will be given to nanofibrous adsorbents and membranes, as well as graphene membranes for desalination.

Dr. Shahin Homaeigohar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanostructured membranes
  • nanostructured adsorbents
  • nanocomposite
  • electrospinning
  • desalination
  • dye removal
  • graphene
  • carbon nanomaterials
  • fouling
  • numerical modeling

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Au/ZnO Hybrid Nanostructures on Electrospun Polymeric Mats for Improved Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Pollutants
Water 2019, 11(9), 1787; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11091787 - 28 Aug 2019
Abstract
An innovative approach for the fabrication of hybrid photocatalysts on a solid porous polymeric system for the heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants is herein presented. Specifically, gold/zinc oxide (Au/ZnO)-based porous nanocomposites are formed in situ by a two-step process. In the first [...] Read more.
An innovative approach for the fabrication of hybrid photocatalysts on a solid porous polymeric system for the heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants is herein presented. Specifically, gold/zinc oxide (Au/ZnO)-based porous nanocomposites are formed in situ by a two-step process. In the first step, branched ZnO nanostructures fixed on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) fibers are obtained upon the thermal conversion of zinc acetate-loaded PMMA electrospun mats. Subsequently, Au nanoparticles (NPs) are directly formed on the surface of the ZnO through an adsorption dipping process and thermal treatment. The effect of different concentrations of the Au ion solutions to the formation of Au/ZnO hybrids is investigated, proving that for 1 wt % of Au NPs with respect to the composite there is an effective metal–semiconductor interfacial interaction. As a result, a significant improvement of the photocatalytic performance of the ZnO/PMMA electrospun nanocomposite for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) and bisphenol A (BPA) under UV light is observed. Therefore, the proposed method can be used to prepare flexible fibrous composites characterized by a high surface area, flexibility, and light weight. These can be used for heterogeneous photocatalytic applications in water treatment, without the need of post treatment steps for their removal from the treated water which may restrict their wide applicability and cause secondary pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Treatment with New Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation of Biomass Activated Carbon Supported Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (Nzvi) and Its Application in Decolorization of Methyl Orange from Aqueous Solution
Water 2019, 11(8), 1671; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11081671 - 12 Aug 2019
Abstract
The nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has great potential to degrade organic polluted wastewater. In this study, the nZVI particles were obtained by the pulse electrodeposition and were loaded on the biomass activated carbon (BC) for synthesizing the composite material of BC-nZVI. The composite [...] Read more.
The nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has great potential to degrade organic polluted wastewater. In this study, the nZVI particles were obtained by the pulse electrodeposition and were loaded on the biomass activated carbon (BC) for synthesizing the composite material of BC-nZVI. The composite material was characterized by SEM-EDS and XRD and was also used for the decolorization of methyl orange (MO) test. The results showed that the 97.94% removal percentage demonstrated its promise in the remediation of dye wastewater for 60 min. The rate of MO matched well with the pseudo-second-order model, and the rate-limiting step may be a chemical sorption between the MO and BC-nZVI. The removal percentage of MO can be effectively improved with higher temperature, larger BC-nZVI dosage, and lower initial concentration of MO at the pH of 7 condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Treatment with New Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Study of Four TiO2-Based Photocatalysts to Degrade 2,4-D in a Semi-Passive System
Water 2019, 11(3), 621; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030621 - 26 Mar 2019
Abstract
In this study, the relative efficiency of four forms of supported titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a photocatalyst to degrade 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in Killex®, a commercially available herbicide was studied. Coated glass spheres, anodized plate, anodized mesh, and electro-photocatalysis [...] Read more.
In this study, the relative efficiency of four forms of supported titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a photocatalyst to degrade 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in Killex®, a commercially available herbicide was studied. Coated glass spheres, anodized plate, anodized mesh, and electro-photocatalysis using the anodized mesh were evaluated under an ultraviolet – light-emitting diode (UV-LED) light source at λ = 365 nm in a semi-passive mode. Energy consumption of the system was used to compare the efficiency of the photocatalysts. The results showed both photospheres and mesh consumed approximately 80 J/cm3 energy followed by electro-photocatalysis (112.2 J/cm3), and the anodized plate (114.5 J/cm3). Although electro-photocatalysis showed the fastest degradation rate (K = 5.04 mg L−1 h−1), its energy consumption was at the same level as the anodized plate with a lower degradation rate constant of 3.07 mg L−1 h−1. The results demonstrated that three-dimensional nanotubes of TiO2 surrounding the mesh provide superior degradation compared to one-dimensional arrays on the planar surface of the anodized plate. With limited broad-scale comparative studies between varieties of different TiO2 supports, this study provides a comparative analysis of relative degradation efficiencies between the four photocatalytic configurations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Treatment with New Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
An Amphiphilic, Graphitic Buckypaper Capturing Enzyme Biomolecules from Water
Water 2019, 11(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11010002 - 20 Dec 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
The development of carbon nanomaterials for adsorption based removal of organic pollutants from water is a progressive research subject. In this regard, carbon nanomaterials with bifunctionality towards polar and non-polar or even amphiphilic undesired materials are indeed attractive for further study and implementation. [...] Read more.
The development of carbon nanomaterials for adsorption based removal of organic pollutants from water is a progressive research subject. In this regard, carbon nanomaterials with bifunctionality towards polar and non-polar or even amphiphilic undesired materials are indeed attractive for further study and implementation. Here, we created carbon buckypaper adsorbents comprising amphiphilic (oxygenated amorphous carbon (a-COx)/graphite (G)) nanofilaments that can dynamically adsorb organic biomolecules (i.e., urease enzyme) and thus purify the wastewaters of relevant industries. Given the dynamic conditions of the test, the adsorbent was highly efficient in adsorption of the enzyme (88%) while being permeable to water (4750 L·h−1m−2bar−1); thus, it holds great promise for further development and upscaling. A subsequent citric acid functionalization declined selectivity of the membrane to urease, implying that the biomolecules adsorb mostly via graphitic domains rather than oxidized, polar amorphous carbon ones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Treatment with New Nanomaterials)
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