E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Water Quality of Freshwater Ecosystems in a Temperate Climate"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ryszard Gołdyn

Department of Water Protection, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznań, Poland
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 48618295781
Interests: water quality, freshwater ecology, aquatic ecosystems, lakes eutrophication, limnology, ecological restoration, phytoplankton ecology, phycology, hydrobiology
Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Piotr Klimaszyk

Department of Water Protection, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznań, Poland
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 48618295930
Interests: limnology, freshwater ecology, lakes eutrophication, lake–catchment relations, fish ecology, benthic invertebrates, pharmaceutical pollution

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In many regions of the world, water is a factor limiting economic development. Due to global climate changes, further adverse changes in access to water resources are expected. Under these conditions, good water quality becomes an extremely important factor that determines its economic utility, including water supply, recreation, and agriculture. The quality of water depends on many factors, the most important of which are related to human impact on water ecosystems, especially the impact of various pollutants from municipal economy, industry, and agriculture. Hydrotechnical changes, such as river damming, drainage processes, and water transport between catchments, also have a significant impact. Water quality is also dependent on the impact of natural conditions (climatic, catchment, water organisms, and their interactions within the food-webs).

The planned Special Issue will contain the results of research on changes in water quality under the influence of various natural and anthropogenic factors, including the following:

- The impact of dam reservoirs and lakes on river water quality;

- The impact of various restoration methods on water bodies;

- The effect of water blooms, especially caused by cyanobateria;

- The impact of catchment use on the quality of water in small water bodies;

- Specific pollution of freshwater ecosystems;

- Contamination caused by stormwaters, etc.

Prof. Dr. Ryszard Gołdyn
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Piotr Klimaszyk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pollution
  • cyanobacteria
  • eutrophication
  • catchment
  • water supply
  • ecosystem restoration
  • phosphorus

Published Papers (1 paper)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Long-Term Water Quality Changes as a Result of a Sustainable Restoration—A Case Study of Dimictic Lake Durowskie
Water 2019, 11(3), 616; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030616
Received: 18 February 2019 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 22 March 2019 / Published: 25 March 2019
PDF Full-text (5480 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nature-based solutions in lake restoration enable gradual ecosystem reconstruction without drastic and expensive intervention. Sustainable lake restoration involves limited external interference strong enough to initiate and maintain positive changes in the ecosystem. It was introduced in Lake Durowskie, an urban, flow-through lake situated [...] Read more.
Nature-based solutions in lake restoration enable gradual ecosystem reconstruction without drastic and expensive intervention. Sustainable lake restoration involves limited external interference strong enough to initiate and maintain positive changes in the ecosystem. It was introduced in Lake Durowskie, an urban, flow-through lake situated in Western Poland, using hypolimnetic aeration, phosphorus precipitation with small doses of chemicals and biomanipulation in 2009, and is continued until today. Oxygen conditions in the lake hypolimnion after initial deterioration were gradually improved, and finally a shortening of the duration and range of oxygen deficits was observed. Nitrogen transformations were induced in the hypolimnion by water aeration as well, reducing ammonium N (30% during 2013–2017 in comparison to 2008) and increasing nitrates (90% in 2013–2017 in comparison to 2008). Phosphorus content was diminished (19% during 2015–2017 in relation to 2008 for SRP) due to effective iron-binding and a smaller amount of fresh organic matter being decomposed. Its reduction was related to lower phytoplankton biomass, expressed in a decrease of chlorophyll-a concentrations (55% reduction during 2013–2017 in comparison to 2008) and an increase in water transparency (two-fold during 2013–2017 in relation to 2008) throughout the nine years of treatment. A long-term restoration program, based on non-aggressive, multiple in-lake techniques was applied and, despite the lack of a reduction in total external loading, was able to suppress progressive eutrophication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality of Freshwater Ecosystems in a Temperate Climate)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1.Functional groups of phytoplankton and their relationship with environmental factors in the restored Uzarzewskie Lake

Anna Kozak, Agnieszka Budzyńska, Renata Dondajewska, Katarzyna Kowalczewska-Madura, Ryszard Gołdyn

Department of Water Protection, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznań, Poland, e-mail: [email protected]

 Abstract

Uzarzewskie Lake is a small, postglacial lake, located in Western Poland. The lake is under restoration treatment since 2006; the first iron treatment was done for 2 years and than spring water was directed into the hypolimnion in order to improve water oxygenation near the bottom sediments.

Epilimnetic phytoplankton was sampled monthly from March to November for 9 years at the station in the middle of the lake, from the surface to the depth of 2 m. The relationship between phytoplankton groups and environmental factors (water temperature, transparency, ammonium nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen and zooplankton) were examined (RDA in CANOCO). Phytoplankton composition was analysed in 3 periods: (1) before restoration; (2) during first method of restoration and (3) when the second method was implemented in the lake.

During the studies of phytoplankton biomass 12 coda were dominating. Cyanobacteria, coda H1, dominated in phytoplankton community before restoration. S1 group mostly dominated during the first method was used, other groups especially J, Lo, X2 dominated during the treatment with second method.

2.Role of zooplankton indices in the water quality assessment of field ponds undergoing various types of anthropogenic pressure

Natalia Kuczyńska-Kippen

Department of Water Protection, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznań, Poland, e-mail: [email protected]

Abstract

I studied rotifer and crustacean communities in a set of almost 300 small water bodies as to identify a response of community indices to both abiotic (pH, conductivity, oxygen concentration, nutrient content), biotic (fish presence, primary production as chlorophyll a concentration, macrophyte cover along with biometric features of a plant stand) and morphometric characteristics (size, depth) in two types of ponds differing in the level of human stress in the direct catchment area. I found that even though particular ponds greatly differed in their zooplankton community structure, the reaction of a community to human-induced transformation is significant. Ponds of low human alterations harboured generally much richer zooplankton communities, both in group of rotifers and microcrustaceans, with higher share of rare species, which increase the overall value of a habitat.

3.The effect of human impact on the water quality and biocoenosis of the soft water lobelia lake

Klimaszyk P.1, Piotrowicz R.1, Rosińska J.2, Kuczyńska-Kippen N.1, Szeląg-Wasilewska E.1, Borowiak D.3, Kraska M.1

1) Department of Water Protection, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznań, Poland

2) Department of Environmental Medicine, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 8      60-806 Poznań, Poland

3) Department of Limnology, University of Gdańsk, Bażyńskiego 4  80-952, Gdańsk, Poland

 Abstract

Soft water lobelia lakes occur in temperate and boreal zones of the northern hemisphere. They usually are situated on granite bedrock or low calcareous, sandy soil. Lobelia lakes are particularly prone to human impact because of low buffer capacity of waters.

The studies of the water quality and biocoenosis dynamic of one of the biggest Polish soft water, Lake Jeleń, have been carried out since the early 90’ of 20th century. The lake is located within the boundaries of Bytów city and therefore is under strong human impact. For the last 30 years gradual decrease of water quality was observed. Increase of nutrients concentration in water column cause decrease of water transparency and more intensive stratification of thermal and oxygen conditions during vegetation season. Deterioration of physical and chemical properties of water resulted in quantity and quality changes of planktonic assemblages’ structure and gradual decrease of area covered by characteristic plant species.

Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top