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Article

Riparian Ground Beetles (Coleoptera) on the Banks of Running and Standing Waters

1
Department of Invertebrate Fauna and Systematics, Schmalhausen Institute of Zoology NAS of Ukraine, 01030 Kyiv, Ukraine
2
Faculty of Natural Sciences and Geography, Sumy Makarenko State Pedagogical University, 40002 Sumy, Ukraine
3
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Lublin University of Technology, 20-618 Lublin, Poland
4
Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Lublin University of Technology, 20-618 Lublin, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(6), 1785; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061785
Received: 29 April 2020 / Revised: 13 June 2020 / Accepted: 19 June 2020 / Published: 23 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality of Freshwater Ecosystems in a Temperate Climate)
Rivers and their floodplains offer a wide variety of habitats for invertebrates. River ecosystems are subject to high anthropic influence: as a result the channel morphology is changed, swamps are drained, floodplains are built up, and rivers are polluted. All this has radically changed the environment for the inhabitants of the floodplains, including riparian stenotopic species. Although riparian arthropods are oriented primarily to the production of hydro-ecosystems, the type of water body—lentic or lotic—has a determining effect in the structure of communities. Most riparian arthropods have evolutionarily adapted to riverbanks with significant areas of open alluvial banks. This paper considered the structure of assemblages of ground beetles associated with the riverbanks and the shores of floodplain lakes and their differences. The banks of rivers and the shores of floodplain lakes were considered separately due to the differences in the habitats associated with them. Our results showed that riverbanks, which experience significant pollution, were actively colonized by vegetation and were unsuitable for most riparian ground beetles. The shores of floodplain lakes, being an optional habitat for riparian arthropods, cannot serve as refugia. Thus, the transformation of floodplain landscapes and river pollution creates a problem for the biological diversity of floodplain ecosystems, since riparian stenotopic species of the riverbanks become rare and disappear. View Full-Text
Keywords: riverbanks; floodplain lakes; Carabidae; stenotopic species; assemblage; overgrown riverbanks; floodplain lakes; Carabidae; stenotopic species; assemblage; overgrown
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kirichenko-Babko, M.; Danko, Y.; Franus, M.; Stępniewski, W.; Babko, R. Riparian Ground Beetles (Coleoptera) on the Banks of Running and Standing Waters. Water 2020, 12, 1785. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061785

AMA Style

Kirichenko-Babko M, Danko Y, Franus M, Stępniewski W, Babko R. Riparian Ground Beetles (Coleoptera) on the Banks of Running and Standing Waters. Water. 2020; 12(6):1785. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061785

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kirichenko-Babko, Marina, Yaroslav Danko, Małgorzata Franus, Witold Stępniewski, and Roman Babko. 2020. "Riparian Ground Beetles (Coleoptera) on the Banks of Running and Standing Waters" Water 12, no. 6: 1785. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061785

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