Novel Approaches in Water Productivity

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water, Agriculture and Aquaculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2020) | Viewed by 2809

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Daugherty Water for Food Global Institute, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, NE 68588, USA
Interests: developing remote sensing applications for irrigated agriculture; hydrology and natural resources monitoring

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Daugherty Water for Food Global Institute, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
Interests: water footprint assessment; water productivity; virtual water; water scarcity; water sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The combined effect of the growing population, changing diet preferences, and the rising demand for biofuels is putting increased pressure on global freshwater resources. In many parts of the world, freshwater scarcity is already evident and unless the management of these resources is improved, future limitations may constrain global food and fiber production. To address these growing pressures, there is an increased emphasis on managing water responsibly. This requires knowledge of water productivity, sectoral water footprint, distribution system efficiency and water governance. Water productivity analysis and its interpretation are dependent on the scales of analysis: crops, fields, farms, irrigation systems, basins and agricultural regions. Thus, the challenge is understanding variation of water productivity across space and time with clear terminology and definitions.

This Special Issue invites submissions related to water productivity assessment employing different tools including field trials and data, modeling, remote sensing, and a combination of these. Emphasis will be given to novel approaches in assessing the water productivity of crops, livestock products, fisheries in different regions of the world. Papers describing how future climate change might affect water productivity levels are also welcome. In addition, papers might set water productivity benchmarks, identify water productivity gaps, and describe approaches to close water productivity gaps.

Dr. Christopher M. U. Neale
Dr. Mesfin Mekonnen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Water productivity
  • Water productivity benchmarks
  • Water productivity gaps
  • Field trials
  • Remote sensing
  • Crop modeling
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 564 KiB  
Article
Industrially Finished Calves: A Water Footprint-Profitability Paradox
by Frikkie Alberts Maré and Henry Jordaan
Water 2019, 11(12), 2565; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11122565 - 5 Dec 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2441
Abstract
The feed conversion rate is one of the most important determinants of the water footprint (WF) of beef and is known to vary between different cattle breeds. The objective of this study was to estimate the WF of industrially finished calves of seven [...] Read more.
The feed conversion rate is one of the most important determinants of the water footprint (WF) of beef and is known to vary between different cattle breeds. The objective of this study was to estimate the WF of industrially finished calves of seven different cattle breeds on two different feeding regimes: normal pre-determined feeding period (NPFP) and profit-maximising feeding period (PMFP). Data were collected by finishing 35 calves of each of the seven breeds in a feedlot. Green, blue and grey WFs were estimated for the different feeding regimes, and a feedlot simulation provided the effect of the different feeding regimes on the water footprint, financial margin and the water footprint per rand of margin. The results indicated that the water footprint differed notably between breeds on the same feeding regime, as well as between the feeding regimes. While the PMFP had a 1% higher water footprint per year in a typical feedlot than the NPFP, the financial margin was 33% more, resulting in a 24% decrease in the water footprint per South African rand of margin. The contributions of green, blue and grey water to the total WF were 91.5%, 2.5% and 6%, respectively, irrespective of breed or feeding regime. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Approaches in Water Productivity)
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