Special Issue "Vulnerability of Mountainous Water Resources and Hydrological Regimes"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jintao Liu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China
Interests: hillslope hydrology; alpine hydrology; hydrologic similarity and classification; runoff processes and modelling; digital drainage algorithm; soil thickness evolution; critical zone observations
Prof. Dr. Fan Lu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, Beijing 100048, China
Interests: climate change and water resources; drought risk; non-stationary; statistics of extreme values; hydrological frequency
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Xiangying Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Earth Surface System and Environmental Carrying Capacity, Northwest University, Xi’an 710027, China
Interests: cryohydrology; water chemistry; isotopic hydrology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Hu Liu
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China
Interests: ecohydrology and geomorphology of water-controlled ecosystem; self-organized vegetation patterning processes; hydropedology and soil hydrology; coupling hydropedology and ecohydrology
Dr. Xiaole Han
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, China
Interests: critical zone science; experimental hydrology; hydrological connectivity; hillslope surface and subsurface flow interaction; rainfall–runoff response; geophysical mapping of hillslope structure

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mountains serve as a significant source of freshwater for nearby lowlands and, by extension, for ecosystems and society. Recent studies suggest that mountain blocks may provide resilience to water resource development through storage and delayed discharge in glaciers, snowpacks, permafrost, and complex mountain aquifers. Nonetheless, the effects of water storage and delayed discharge as a regionally important buffer have been greatly underestimated. Not only that, but our advances in mountain runoff regimes have also slowed down other fields of hydrology. Moreover, mountainous catchments are extremely sensitive and vulnerable to climate change and human activities. Therefore, it is vital to understand the mechanisms and long-term changes of runoff in mountainous areas and thus quantify the vulnerability of water resources for resilience utility.

We invite original research articles that contribute to ongoing efforts to understand hydrological regimes and assess the vulnerability of mountainous water resources under global changes. Among the topics of interest for this Special Issue are:

  • Critical zone structures and flow pathways, and transit time in mountains through geophysical and geochemical techniques;
  • Aquifers in various geomorphic units and groundwater evolution in mountain blocks;
  • Vulnerability of hydrological regimes (storage–discharge) in response to interannual fluctuations in precipitation and to climate changes and human activities;
  • Coevolution of climate–terrain–soil–vegetation in determining long-term catchment dynamics;
  • Ecohydrological effects of vegetation conservation and restoration in degraded mountainous regions;
  • Release and transport of water/sediment and relevant nutrients from mountain or cryospheric regions and their impact on water quality and aquatic ecosystems;
  • Water regulation function of catchment overridden by the climate regime and land use for sustainable water resource management;
  • Impacts of hydroclimatic change on hydropower potential;
  • Climate change and hydrological extremes.

Prof. Dr. Jintao Liu
Prof. Dr. Fan Lu
Prof. Dr. Xiangying Li
Dr. Hu Liu
Dr. Xiaole Han
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mountainous catchment
  • hydrological regimes
  • water quality
  • hydrochemistry
  • nutrients
  • cryospheric region
  • mountain aquifer
  • catchment coevolution
  • ecohydrological effects
  • hydrological extremes
  • climate change
  • hydropower potential
  • water resource management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Abundant Precipitation in Qilian Mountains Generated from the Recycled Moisture over the Adjacent Arid Hexi Corridor, Northwest China
Water 2021, 13(23), 3354; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13233354 - 26 Nov 2021
Viewed by 331
Abstract
The observed precipitation was suggestive of abundant precipitation in upstream Qilian mountains and low precipitation in the downstream oasis and desert in an endorheic basin. However, precipitation in mountains generated from the recycled moisture over oasis and desert areas has rarely been studied. [...] Read more.
The observed precipitation was suggestive of abundant precipitation in upstream Qilian mountains and low precipitation in the downstream oasis and desert in an endorheic basin. However, precipitation in mountains generated from the recycled moisture over oasis and desert areas has rarely been studied. The climatological patterns of water vapor from 1980 to 2017 in the Qilian Mountain Region (QMR) and Hexi Corridor Region (HCR) were investigated by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Interim reanalysis dataset and the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application, Version 2 reanalysis dataset. The results suggest that the precipitable water content decreases from the adjacent to the mountain areas. There are two channels that transport water vapor from the HCR to the QMR in the low troposphere (surface—600 hPa), suggesting that parts of recycled moisture generated from evapotranspiration over the oasis and desert of the HCR is transported to the QMR, contributing to the abundant precipitation in the QMR. This indicates that the transport mechanism is probably because of the “cold and wet island effect” of the cryosphere in QMR. This is likely one of the essential mechanisms of the water cycle in endorheic river basins, which has rarely been reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vulnerability of Mountainous Water Resources and Hydrological Regimes)
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Article
Seasonal Variations in Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Source Region of the Yellow River on the Tibetan Plateau
Water 2021, 13(20), 2901; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202901 - 15 Oct 2021
Viewed by 277
Abstract
Rivers as the link between terrestrial ecosystems and oceans have been demonstrated to transport a large amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to downstream ecosystems. In the source region of the Yellow River (SRYR), climate warming has resulted in the rapid retreat of [...] Read more.
Rivers as the link between terrestrial ecosystems and oceans have been demonstrated to transport a large amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to downstream ecosystems. In the source region of the Yellow River (SRYR), climate warming has resulted in the rapid retreat of glaciers and permafrost, which has raised discussion on whether DOC production will increase significantly. Here, we present three-year data of DOC concentrations in river water and precipitation, explore the deposition and transport processes of DOC from SRYR. Results show that annual mean concentrations of riverine DOC ranged from 2.03 to 2.34 mg/L, with an average of 2.21 mg/L. Its seasonal variation is characterized by the highest concentration in spring and summer (2.65 mg/L and 2.62 mg/L, respectively), followed by autumn (1.95 mg/L), and the lowest in winter (1.44 mg/L), which is closely related to changes in river runoff under the influence of precipitation and temperature. The average concentration of DOC in precipitation (2.18 mg/L) is comparable with riverine DOC, while the value is inversely related to precipitation amount and is considered to be the result of precipitation dilution. DOC deposition flux in precipitation that is affected by both precipitation amount and DOC concentration roughly was 86,080, 105,804, and 73,072 tons/year from 2013 to 2015, respectively. DOC flux delivered by the river ranged from 24,629 to 37,539 tons/year and was dominated by river discharge. Although permafrost degradation in SRYR is increasing, DOC yield is not as significant as previously assumed and is much less than other large rivers in the world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vulnerability of Mountainous Water Resources and Hydrological Regimes)
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Communication
Snowmelt and Snow Sublimation in the Indus Basin
Water 2021, 13(19), 2621; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13192621 - 23 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 611
Abstract
The Indus basin is considered as the one with the highest dependence on snowmelt runoff in High Mountain Asia. The recent High Mountain Asia snow reanalysis enables us to go beyond previous studies by evaluating both snowmelt and snow sublimation at the basin [...] Read more.
The Indus basin is considered as the one with the highest dependence on snowmelt runoff in High Mountain Asia. The recent High Mountain Asia snow reanalysis enables us to go beyond previous studies by evaluating both snowmelt and snow sublimation at the basin scale. Over 2000–2016, basin-average snowmelt was 101 ± 11 Gt.a−1 (121 ± 13 mm.a−1), which represents about 25–30% of basin-average annual precipitation. Snow sublimation accounts for 11% of the mean annual snow ablation, but with a large spatial variability across the basin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vulnerability of Mountainous Water Resources and Hydrological Regimes)
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