Special Issue "C, Nutrients and Trace Elements in Northern Lake Ecosystems: The Impact of Anthropogenic Load and Climate Change"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2022) | Viewed by 3280

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Rinat M. Manasypov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
BIO-GEO-CLIM Laboratory, Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk, Russia
Interests: northern lake ecosystems; biogeochemical cycles; thermokarst; permafrost; surface waters; trace elements accumulation; sediments; macrophytes; western Siberia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Current changes in the climate and increased anthropogenic impact on the environment make the study of lake ecosystems increasingly important. Distribution, accumulation and migration of chemical elements in aquatic ecosystems are closely related to the processes in the biotic and abiotic components of these ecosystems. Therefore, a detailed and comprehensive assessment of the biogeochemical cycles in the lake ecosystems, and their response to current environmental changes and anthropogenic load, as well as interpretation of the role of components of lake ecosystems as markers of these processes, are an important scientific goal.

This Special Issue welcomes articles dedicated to all aspects of the behavior of carbon, nutrients, trace elements and pollutants in northern lake ecosystems, including both anthropogenically altered and pristine regions. Of special interest are papers dealing with the influence of climate change and human activities on greenhouse gas emission, nutrients and trace element concentrations in the conjugate components (bottom sediments–lake water and pore water–biota) of boreal and high latitude lake ecosystems, as well as the factors that affect this content.

Papers on field, experimental, and modeling studies related to greenhouse gas emission, nutrients, trace elements and pollutant concentrations may focus on climate warming, pollution, and the recovery of lake ecosystems.

Dr. Rinat M. Manasypov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Carbon
  • Trace elements
  • Nutrients
  • Migration
  • Accumulation
  • Biogeochemical cycles
  • Northern lake ecosystems
  • Climate warming
  • Greenhouse gases
  • Pollution
  • Anthropogenic impact

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Seasonal and Spatial Variations of Dissolved Organic Matter Biodegradation along the Aquatic Continuum in the Southern Taiga Bog Complex, Western Siberia
Water 2022, 14(23), 3969; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14233969 - 06 Dec 2022
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Abstract
The inland aquatic ecosystems play a significant role in the global carbon cycle, owing to the metabolism of terrestrially derived organic matter as it moves through fluvial networks along the water continuum. During this transport, dissolved organic matter (DOM) is microbial processed and [...] Read more.
The inland aquatic ecosystems play a significant role in the global carbon cycle, owing to the metabolism of terrestrially derived organic matter as it moves through fluvial networks along the water continuum. During this transport, dissolved organic matter (DOM) is microbial processed and released into the atmosphere, but the degree and intensity of this processing vary greatly both spatially and temporally. The Western Siberian Lowlands is of particular interest for a quantitative assessment of DOM biodegradation potential because the global areal-scale effects of DOM biodegradation in abundant surface organic-rich waters might be the highest in this region. To this end, we collected water samples along a typical aquatic continuum of the Bakchar Bog (the north-eastern part of the Great Vasyugan Mire) and, following standardized protocol, conducted an experimental study aimed at characterizing the seasonal and spatial variability of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) biodegradability. The biodegradable DOC fraction (BDOC) over the exposure incubation period ranged from 2% to 25%. The natural aquatic continuum “mire–forest–stream–river” demonstrated the systematic evolution of biodegradable DOC among the sites and across the seasons. The highest biodegradation rates were measured during spring flood in May and decreased along the continuum. The maximum possible CO2 production from DOM yielded the maximum possible flux in the range of 0.1 and 0.2 g C-CO2 m−2 day−1 d, which is an order of magnitude lower than the actual net CO2 emissions from the inland waters of the WSL. This study suggests that although the biodegradation of the humic waters of the WSL can sizably modify the concentration and nature of the DOM along the aquatic continuum, it plays only a subordinary role in overall C emissions from the lakes and rivers of the region. Full article
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Article
Seasonal Variation and Vertical Distribution of Inorganic Nutrients in a Small Artificial Lake, Lake Bulan, in Mongolia
Water 2022, 14(12), 1916; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14121916 - 14 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1083
Abstract
This is the first seasonal observation study on nutrient dynamics undertaken in a small freshwater lake with eutrophication in Mongolia. The vertical profile and seasonal fluctuation of nutrients are crucial to understanding the biogeochemical cycles in aquatic systems. In this study, field research [...] Read more.
This is the first seasonal observation study on nutrient dynamics undertaken in a small freshwater lake with eutrophication in Mongolia. The vertical profile and seasonal fluctuation of nutrients are crucial to understanding the biogeochemical cycles in aquatic systems. In this study, field research was carried out at a small and shallow lake, Lake Bulan, in the lower Kharaa River basin. The area has been receiving increased nutrient loads from the water catchment area for the last 20 years. Water samples were collected seasonally from the lake from 2019–2022 and analyzed for nutrients, major cations, trace metals, and dissolved organic carbon. The average concentration of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in the surface lake water had a wide seasonal variation from 0.26 ± 0.11 mg N/L in August to 1.44 ± 0.08 mg N/L in January. Seasonal differences were also observed in the vertical profiles. Concentrations were relatively similar at the various water depths in April and September at turnover time. Thermal stratification was observed when the lake was covered in ice, with the maximum concentrations being observed in the bottom layer in the months of January and August. The phosphate concentration showed a similar variation trend. These results indicate that both the summer and winter stratifications are important for regeneration of nutrients in the bottom layer, biochemical cycling, and mitigating impacts of global warming on small and shallow lakes in Mongolia. Full article
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Article
Nutrients, Organic Matter, and Trace Elements in Lake Gusinoe (Transbaikalia)
Water 2021, 13(21), 2958; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13212958 - 20 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1073
Abstract
Lake Gusinoe is the second largest freshwater lake in Transbaikalia. Lakes serve as a source for drinking water, irrigation, and as a water source for the electricity, aquatic production, and tourism industry. Currently variations of content nutrients and organic matter differ in different [...] Read more.
Lake Gusinoe is the second largest freshwater lake in Transbaikalia. Lakes serve as a source for drinking water, irrigation, and as a water source for the electricity, aquatic production, and tourism industry. Currently variations of content nutrients and organic matter differ in different areas of the lake. The content of total nitrogen, phosphorus, organic matter, and dissolved oxygen are distinguished more than 1.2–2.0 times. In accordance with the behavior of elements in the water, three groups of elements can be distinguished. The first group of elements, including Li, Ga, Ge, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, W, and U, were directly correlated with variations of major elements. The first group of elements showed decreasing concentrations with an increasing amount of total dissolved salt (TDS). The second group of elements, including Fe, Y, Nb, Th, and REE, were correlated oppositely with variations of TDS. The behavior of the third group of elements, including Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, and Pb, decoupled with TDS. The value of the Eu anomaly was positively correlated with TDS. The water of Lake Gusinoe was extremely enriched by W, Mo, V, U, Li, Sr, and Ga; moderately by Ni, Cu, Ge, As, Rb, Cd, and Pb; and minimally by Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, Y, Th, and REE. Full article
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