Special Issue "Ice-Ocean-Atmosphere Exchanges in the Arctic Region and Its Impacts"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Oceans and Coastal Zones".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 November 2022 | Viewed by 1599

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jinpei Yan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Global Change and Marine-Atmospheric Chemistry, Third Institute of Oceanography, MNR, Xiamen, China
Interests: marine biogenic sulfur cycles; marine aerosols; climate change; DIC observation technique

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Arctic is warming faster than any other region of the world, a phenomenon which is known as the amplification of the global climate changing. Arctic warming has accelerated and resulted in the reduction of multiyear and single-year sea ice in this region. Sea ice plays a fundamental role in regulating key earth system processes, including nutrient cycling, air–sea gas exchanges, and climate changes in the Arctic regions. The sea ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean will significantly impact ice–ocean–atmosphere exchanges of different materials, such as CO2, N2O, CH4, DMS, VOCs, aerosols, etc. The increase of greenhouse gases, DMS, and aerosols due to sea ice melting in the Arctic will significantly impact regional climates and change the carbon and sulfur cycles between ocean and atmosphere. However, how the sea ice melting impacts ice–ocean–atmosphere exchanges is a question whose answer is still a mystery when it comes to the Arctic Ocean, due to the limitations of field observations. This Special Issue aims to better understand the response and feedback of ice–ocean–atmosphere interaction to the rapid changes of the Arctic.

Dr. Jinpei Yan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • sea ice
  • air sea exchanges
  • biogenic gases
  • greenhouse gases
  • aerosols
  • climate change
  • ocean acidification
  • VOCs
  • arctic ocean

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Distribution and Driving Mechanism of N2O in Sea Ice and Its Underlying Seawater during Arctic Melt Season
Water 2022, 14(2), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020145 - 07 Jan 2022
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Abstract
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, and the ocean is an important source of N2O. As the Arctic Ocean is strongly affected by global warming, rapid ice melting can have a significant [...] Read more.
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, and the ocean is an important source of N2O. As the Arctic Ocean is strongly affected by global warming, rapid ice melting can have a significant impact on the N2O pattern in the Arctic environment. To better understand this impact, N2O concentration in ice core and underlying seawater (USW) was measured during the seventh Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE2016). The results showed that the average N2O concentration in first-year ice (FYI) was 4.5 ± 1.0 nmol kg−1, and that in multi-year ice (MYI) was 4.8 ± 1.9 nmol kg−1. Under the influence of exchange among atmosphere-sea ice-seawater systems, brine dynamics and possible N2O generation processes at the bottom of sea ice, the FYI showed higher N2O concentrations at the bottom and surface, while lower N2O concentrations were seen inside sea ice. Due to the melting of sea ice and biogeochemical processes, USW presented as the sink of N2O, and the saturation varied from 47.2% to 102.2%. However, the observed N2O concentrations in USW were higher than that of T-N2OUSW due to the sea–air exchange, diffusion process, possible N2O generation mechanism, and the influence of precipitation, and a more detailed mechanism is needed to understand this process in the Arctic Ocean. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ice-Ocean-Atmosphere Exchanges in the Arctic Region and Its Impacts)
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Review

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Review
Effects of Arctic Warming on Microbes and Methane in Different Land Types in Svalbard
Water 2021, 13(22), 3296; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13223296 - 21 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 659
Abstract
Climate change is having a profound impact on Arctic microbiomes and their living environments. However, we have only incomplete knowledge about the seasonal and inter-annual variations observed among these microbes and about their methane regulation mechanisms with respect to glaciers, glacial melting, snow [...] Read more.
Climate change is having a profound impact on Arctic microbiomes and their living environments. However, we have only incomplete knowledge about the seasonal and inter-annual variations observed among these microbes and about their methane regulation mechanisms with respect to glaciers, glacial melting, snow lakes and coastal marine water. This gap in our knowledge limits our understanding of the linkages between climate and environmental change. In the Arctic, there are large reservoirs of methane which are sensitive to temperature changes. If global warming intensifies, larger quantities of methane stored in deep soil and sediments will be released into the atmosphere, causing irreversible effects on the global ecosystem. Methane production is mainly mediated by microorganisms. Although we have some knowledge of microbial community structure, we know less about the methane-correlated microbes in different land types in the Svalbard archipelago, and we do not have a comprehensive grasp of the relationship between them. That is the main reason we have written this paper, in which current knowledge of microorganisms and methane-correlated types in High Arctic Svalbard is described. The problems that need to be addressed in the future are also identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ice-Ocean-Atmosphere Exchanges in the Arctic Region and Its Impacts)
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