Special Issue "Groundwater Resilience to Climate Change and High Pressure"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Moumtaz Razack
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Poitiers, France
Tel. +33 673071069
Interests: water resources (assessment, management, protection), modeling, climate change, geostatistics, hard-rocks and coastal hydrogeological systems
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Bedri Kurtulus
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Environment and Water, King Fahd Petroleum and Mineral Unviersity, Dammam, Saudi Arabia
Tel. +966 550497403
Interests: Karst, Hydrogeology, Remote Sensing, GIS, Geostatistics
Prof. Dr. Philippe Le Coustumer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bordeaux Imaging Center UMS 004 Université de Bordeaux CNRS INSERM INRA
Interests: nanoparticules; colloids; TEM; trace metals; remediation; continental water; soils; emergent contaminants
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Mohamed Meddi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Higher National School of Hydraulics, Blida, Algeria
Tel. +213 665642445
Interests: hydrology, hydrogeology, water resources, climate change
Assist. Prof. Dr. Mustafa Can Canoğlu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sinop University - ENviromental Engineering Department, Turkey
Tel. 00 90 532 696 26 43
Interests: Hydrogeology, Vadose Zone, Karst, Landslide

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Groundwater has over the past few decades become a fundamental resource for social, economic and environmental sustainability. Human well-being, livelihoods, ecosystems, industries, agriculture and urban development are more and more reliant on groundwater. Groundwater development should therefore be carefully managed to fully benefit from its potential, to protect its quality and to guard against the over-exploitation of aquifers.

The sustainability of groundwater is on the one hand linked to policy issues influencing water and land use, and represents one of the major global challenges in natural resource management. On the other hand, groundwater is technically complex. Practical advances in this field are urgently needed, so that technical experts and water managers can reach a common understanding. There is also a need to integrate groundwater and surface water management to ensure better overall water management and allocation.

This Special Issue of Water will focus on the resilience of groundwater resources facing increasingly high pressure exerted by the socio-economic world and facing climate variability and change. Papers on the following subjects are welcomed:

  • Impact of growing pressures and threats (increasing demands, land use changes, drought, over-exploitation) on groundwater resources and related ecosystems.
  • Groundwater and climate change. Resilience and importance of groundwater in adapting to global change.
  • Groundwater monitoring and modelling. Novel approaches to characterizing the spatial–temporal distribution of water resources.
  • Protection and sustainable management of groundwater. Innovative approaches with special emphasis on managed aquifer recharge.
  • Surface water and groundwater interaction. Towards integrated water resource management.
  • Preservation of water resources in coastal aquifers.
  • GW exploration and assessment. Novel approaches using RS and GIS.
  • Understanding water governance. The role of groundwater.
  • Groundwater facing agriculture demands.
  • Case studies.

Prof. Dr. Moumtaz Razack
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Bedri Kurtulus
Prof. Dr. Philippe Le Coustumer
Prof. Dr. Mohamed Meddi
Assist. Prof. Dr. Mustafa Can Canoğlu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Groundwater
  • climate change
  • over-exploitation
  • resilience
  • management
  • monitoring
  • modelling
  • water governance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Simulation of Climate Change Impact on A Coastal Aquifer under Arid Climate. The Tadjourah Aquifer (Republic of Djibouti, Horn of Africa)
Water 2019, 11(11), 2347; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11112347 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
The Republic of Djibouti has an area of 23,000 km2, a coastline 370 km long and a population of 820,000 inhabitants. It experiences an arid climate characterized by high daytime temperatures and low and irregular rainfall (average of 140 mm/year), resulting [...] Read more.
The Republic of Djibouti has an area of 23,000 km2, a coastline 370 km long and a population of 820,000 inhabitants. It experiences an arid climate characterized by high daytime temperatures and low and irregular rainfall (average of 140 mm/year), resulting in continuous periods of drought. These difficult climatic conditions and the absence of perennial surface water have progressively led to an intensive exploitation of groundwater to meet increasing water demands in all sectors (drinking water, agriculture and industries). In coastal areas, seawater intrusion constitutes a significant additional risk of groundwater degradation. This study is focused on the coastal aquifer of Tadjourah which supplies water to the city of Tadjourah, currently comprising 21,000 inhabitants. The main objective of this work is to assess the current resources of this aquifer; its capacity to satisfy, or not, the projected water demands during coming years; and to analyze its vulnerability to seawater intrusion within the frame of climate change. Three RCPs (Representative Concentration Pathway) were used to simulate different climate scenarios up to 2100. The simulated rainfall series allowed to deduce the aquifer recharge up to 2100. The code Seawat was used to model seawater intrusion into the aquifer, using the recharge data deduced from the climate scenarios. The results indicate that the risk of contamination of the Tadjourah coastal aquifer by seawater intrusion is high. The long-term and sustainable exploitation of this aquifer must take into consideration the impact of climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Groundwater Resilience to Climate Change and High Pressure)
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Open AccessArticle
Deep Groundwater as an Alternative Source of Water in the Ogaden Jesoma Sandstone Aquifers of Somali Region, Ethiopia
Water 2019, 11(8), 1735; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11081735 - 20 Aug 2019
Abstract
Between 2015 and 2018, the Horn of Africa was affected by a series of climatic-induced events, namely El Nino, La Nina, and the Indian Ocean Dipole. These events modified the variability of rainfall patterns and resulted in extended periods of low rainfall, low [...] Read more.
Between 2015 and 2018, the Horn of Africa was affected by a series of climatic-induced events, namely El Nino, La Nina, and the Indian Ocean Dipole. These events modified the variability of rainfall patterns and resulted in extended periods of low rainfall, low recharge, and high evapotranspiration. That situation prompted humanitarian water professionals to finance the transportation of water from selected locations with high groundwater potential through water trucks to areas facing groundwater depletion and drought. To mitigate this, UNICEF identified alternative water supplies by exploring sustainable deeper groundwater sources. This paper describes a three-phase methodology of deep groundwater development of wells in the Ogaden Jesoma sandstone aquifers of the Somali region of the Horn of Africa, to a depth of 600 m below ground level. The methodology included the development of groundwater suitability maps using geological and remote sensing data, hydrogeological ground truthing of the maps, and then test drilling at the selected locations. The results concluded that the deep sandstone aquifer of Jesoma can provide fresh water with yields of 15 L/s to the local population of the Somali region. The study provided insights into deep groundwater identification and development as well as adaptive deep borehole drilling as a source for climate-resilient water supplies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Groundwater Resilience to Climate Change and High Pressure)
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