Special Issue "Cross-Sector Green Infrastructure for Improving Urban Storm Water Quality"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. John McCray
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401, USA
Interests: green infrastructure, stormwater, hyporheic zone, human-impacted watersheds, water quality engineering
Dr. Skuyler Herzog

Guest Editor
School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47401, USA
Interests: green infrastructure, stormwater, hyporheic zone, stream restoration, human-impacted watersheds

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are seeking papers on the topic of “Cross-Sector Green Infrastructure for Improving Urban Storm Water Quality”. In the future, water leaving urban areas should be cleaner than water entering those cities. Green infrastructure can play a large role in achieving that vision, but improvements are needed in both the efficiency of individual green infrastructure techniques and in the coordination of green infrastructure across sites and sectors. We seek papers reporting green infrastructure as a storm water quality management technique, including: laboratory and field effectiveness of green infrastructure, innovative engineering designs to increase functional efficiency, urban stream restoration for water quality enhancement, modelling to integrate green infrastructure on larger scales, decision support tools for implementation in urban areas, overcoming policy and legal barriers for implementation, life-cycle analyses, and more.

Preference will be given to multidisciplinary papers that:

  • advance mechanistic understanding of green infrastructure performance for understudied and diverse water quality issues (e.g., bacteria, nutrients, metals, greenhouse gases, trace organics, recreational use standards (e.g., swimmable, fishable waterways), concentration- and load-based compliance);
  • report the impact of green infrastructure planning or decision support tools on performance improvement;
  • use green infrastructure to span traditional management divides between storm water and other sectors (e.g., stream restoration, polishing of wastewater or recycled water, urban agriculture).

Prof. Dr. John McCray
Dr. Skuyler Herzog
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stormwater management
  • stormwater control measures
  • green infrastructure
  • watershed/basin planning
  • urban hydrology
  • streamflow augmentation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Modeling the Influence of Public Risk Perceptions on the Adoption of Green Stormwater Infrastructure: An Application of Bayesian Belief Networks Versus Logistic Regressions on a Statewide Survey of Households in Vermont
Water 2020, 12(10), 2793; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102793 - 08 Oct 2020
Abstract
There is growing environmental psychology and behavior literature with mixed empirical evidence about the influence of public risk perceptions on the adoption of environmentally friendly “green behaviors”. Adoption of stormwater green infrastructure on residential properties, while costlier in the short term compared to [...] Read more.
There is growing environmental psychology and behavior literature with mixed empirical evidence about the influence of public risk perceptions on the adoption of environmentally friendly “green behaviors”. Adoption of stormwater green infrastructure on residential properties, while costlier in the short term compared to conventional greywater infrastructure, plays an important role in the reduction of nutrient loading from non-point sources into freshwater rivers and lakes. In this study, we use Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs) to analyze a 2015 survey dataset (sample size = 472 respondents) about the adoption of green infrastructure (GSI) in Vermont’s residential areas, most of which are located in either the Lake Champlain Basin or Connecticut River Basin. Eight categories of GSI were investigated: roof diversion, permeable pavement, infiltration trenches, green roofs, rain gardens, constructed wetlands, tree boxes, and others. Using both unsupervised and supervised machine learning algorithms, we used Bayesian Belief Networks to quantify the influence of public risk perceptions on GSI adoption while accounting for a range of demographic and spatial variables. We also compare the effectiveness of the Bayesian Belief Network approach and logistic regression in predicting the pro-environmental behaviors (adoption of GSI). The results show that influencing factors for current adoption differ by the type of GSI. Increased perception of risk from stormwater issues is associated with the adoption of rain gardens and infiltration trenches. Runoff issues are more likely to be considered the governments’ (town, state, and federal agencies) responsibility, whereas lawn erosion is more likely to be considered the residents’ responsibility. When using the same set of variables to predict pro-environmental behaviors (adoption of GSI), the BBN approach produces more accurate predictions compared to logistic regression. The results provide insights for further research on how to encourage residents to take measures for mitigating stormwater issues and stormwater management. Full article
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