Special Issue "Novel Forward Osmotic Process for Seawater and Wastewater Treatment"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ali Altaee
Website
Guest Editor
University of Technology Sydney, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sydney, Australia
Interests: Membrane Technologies, Renewable Energy, Desalination, Soil Remediation, Hydropower

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue on “Novel Forward Osmotic Process for Seawater and Wastewater Treatment” in the journal Water. The Special Issue covers topics related to applications of forward osmosis energy in desalination and wastewater treatment, draw solution engineering, membrane fabrication, forward osmosis applications in food and agriculture, regeneration processes, energy efficiency and fouling mechanisms. Full-length papers, review papers and simulation studies that cover the most recent advancements in forward osmosis technology are strongly invited to submit to the Special Issue. Academics are encouraged to share their ideas and expertise in the field of osmotically-driven membrane technology beyond the conventional applications such as dairy processing, pharmaceutical and drug delivery, and produced wastewater treatment.

Scientists with new ideas are welcomed to contact the Guest Editor Dr. Ali Altaee at [email protected]. We are looking forward to receiving your research papers and studies for this Special Issue. Please submit before the end of September 2019

Dr. Ali Altaee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Forward Osmosis
  • Seawater
  • Draw Solution
  • Desalination
  • Membrane Technology
  • Filtration
  • Osmotic Pressure

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Pretreatment Techniques for Produced Water with Subsequent Forward Osmosis Remediation
Water 2019, 11(7), 1437; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11071437 - 12 Jul 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Unconventional oil and gas extraction is on the rise across the United States and comprises an integral component in meeting the nation’s energy needs. The primary by-product of this industrious process is produced water, which is a challenging matrix to remediate because of [...] Read more.
Unconventional oil and gas extraction is on the rise across the United States and comprises an integral component in meeting the nation’s energy needs. The primary by-product of this industrious process is produced water, which is a challenging matrix to remediate because of its complex physical and chemical composition. Forward osmosis is a viable option to treat high-salinity produced water; however, fouling has been an issue. This study aimed to treat produced water before using forward osmosis as a remediation option. Trials consisted of a series of five experiments in order to evaluate the performance of the membrane. Samples were treated by centrifugation, activated carbon, filtration, ferric chloride, as well as coagulants and a polymer. It can be concluded that forward osmosis can be used to extract water from high-salinity oil field brines and produced water, and that pretreating the produced water decreased the tendency for fouling. The pretreatment with the overall best performance was activated carbon, which also yielded the lowest total organic carbon concentrations of 1.9 mg/L. During remediation trials using produced water pretreated with activated carbon as the feed solution, there was a 14% decrease in flux over the course of the 7 h trials. The membrane performance was restored after washing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Forward Osmotic Process for Seawater and Wastewater Treatment)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Organic Fouling in Forward Osmosis: A Comprehensive Review
Water 2020, 12(5), 1505; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051505 - 25 May 2020
Cited by 5
Abstract
Organic fouling in the forward osmosis process is complex and influenced by different parameters in the forward osmosis such as type of feed and draw solution, operating conditions, and type of membrane. In this article, we reviewed organic fouling in the forward osmosis [...] Read more.
Organic fouling in the forward osmosis process is complex and influenced by different parameters in the forward osmosis such as type of feed and draw solution, operating conditions, and type of membrane. In this article, we reviewed organic fouling in the forward osmosis by focusing on wastewater treatment applications. Model organic foulants used in the forward osmosis literature were highlighted, which were followed by the characteristics of organic foulants when real wastewater was used as feed solution. The various physical and chemical cleaning protocols for the organic fouled membrane are also discussed. The study also highlighted the effective pre-treatment strategies that are effective in reducing the impact of organic fouling on the forward osmosis (FO) membrane. The efficiency of cleaning methods for the removal of organic fouling in the FO process was investigated, including recommendations on future cleaning technologies such as Ultraviolet and Ultrasound. Generally, a combination of physical and chemical cleaning is the best for restoring the water flux in the FO process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Forward Osmotic Process for Seawater and Wastewater Treatment)
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Open AccessReview
A Review of Fouling Mechanisms, Control Strategies and Real-Time Fouling Monitoring Techniques in Forward Osmosis
Water 2019, 11(4), 695; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040695 - 04 Apr 2019
Cited by 15
Abstract
Forward osmosis has gained tremendous attention in the field of desalination and wastewater treatment. However, membrane fouling is an inevitable issue. Membrane fouling leads to flux decline, can cause operational problems and can result in negative consequences that can damage the membrane. Hereby, [...] Read more.
Forward osmosis has gained tremendous attention in the field of desalination and wastewater treatment. However, membrane fouling is an inevitable issue. Membrane fouling leads to flux decline, can cause operational problems and can result in negative consequences that can damage the membrane. Hereby, we attempt to review the different types of fouling in forward osmosis, cleaning and control strategies for fouling mitigation, and the impact of membrane hydrophilicity, charge and morphology on fouling. The fundamentals of biofouling, organic, colloidal and inorganic fouling are discussed with a focus on recent studies. We also review some of the in-situ real-time online fouling monitoring technologies for real-time fouling monitoring that can be applicable to future research on forward osmosis fouling studies. A brief discussion on critical flux and the coupled effects of fouling and concentration polarization is also provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Forward Osmotic Process for Seawater and Wastewater Treatment)
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