Special Issue "The Ecological Assessment of Rivers and Estuaries: Present and Future"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Maria João Feio
Website
Guest Editor
MARE—Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: environmental impact assessment; freshwater biology; environment protection; community structure; ecological monitoring; benthic ecology; functional ecology; urban aquatic ecosystems; restoration
Dr. Joao M. Neto
Website
Guest Editor
MARE—Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: water quality; ecology; biodiversity and conservation; marine ecology; environmental science; climate change; environment; ecosystem ecology; rivers; biodiversity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 20th century brought an exponential increase in bioassessment methods for rivers and estuaries. In Europe, bioassessment methods and classification systems were improved by the publication of the Water Framework Directive (WFD), which also led to the investigation of new biological and more complex indices. As the WFD influenced the development of new methods across the world, European tools were also influenced by methods developed in the USA, Canada, and other parts of the world. In Europe, this progress resulted in the need for an intercalibration process to compare assessments of water bodies. Yet, development of assessment tools for rivers/estuaries and their implementation in national monitoring programs is far from being a reality across the world, even in temperate regions, but specifically in tropical or dry climates. It is not clear how unsatisfactory classifications of rivers/estuaries have led to restoration and mitigation measures and to the improvement in water bodies. Official monitoring programs are still mostly based on structural aspects of communities, i.e., in the taxonomic composition and abundance, whereas the functional assessments are not conducted. Finally, the last years have witnessed an impressive effort to find tools based on molecular data (DNA, eDNA) with the aim of reducing costs and time and obtaining more complete overviews of the ecosystems, including rare or cryptic species that could be neglected by morphological evaluations. All these aspects are included within the scope of this Special Issue.

Dr. Maria João Feio
Dr. Joao M. Neto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioassessment
  • freshwaters
  • transitional waters
  • functional assessment
  • tools
  • aquatic communities
  • indicator species
  • molecular
  • eDNA
  • tropical
  • temperate
  • arid

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Monsoon Rainfall Patterns on Epilithic Diatom Communities in the Hantangang River, Korea
Water 2020, 12(5), 1471; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051471 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
Most of Korea’s rivers and lakes are subject to physico-chemical disturbances, such as increased water quantity and flow rates, and influx of nitrogen and phosphorus, due to intense rainfall concentrated in the Asian monsoon season. To examine the influence of rainfall on epilithic [...] Read more.
Most of Korea’s rivers and lakes are subject to physico-chemical disturbances, such as increased water quantity and flow rates, and influx of nitrogen and phosphorus, due to intense rainfall concentrated in the Asian monsoon season. To examine the influence of rainfall on epilithic diatom communities, we measured the diatom distribution and river water quality at 29 sites along the main-stream and tributaries of the Hantangang River, Korea, in the period of 2012–2015. Water quality parameters in the polluted sites had improved following rainfall, but the response of dominant species varied with water quality; the dominant species Nitzschia fonticola decreased in abundance regardless of sampling sites, and the abundance of Achnanthidium minutissimum in the clean sites and Nitzschia palea in the polluted sites increased after rainfall, respectively. The community dynamic index (CDI) showed that the most obvious shift of epilithic diatom community occurred in the mid-polluted sites in 2013 with the highest rainfall. This suggest that the effect of rainfalls on the epilithic diatom community is dependent on various parameters, such as the magnitude of rainfall, water quality and its biotic compositions of diatom communities, but it also indicates that improving the water quality of rivers is important to promote the resilience of diatom communities to extremes of precipitation. Further investigation is needed to generalize the effects of monsoon rainfall on the epilithic diatom communities, considering rivers with different environmental characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Ecological Assessment of Rivers and Estuaries: Present and Future)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

[1] Progresses on Estuarine Assessment: Global Perspective and Trends

João M Neto et al.

[2] The Ecological Assessment of Rivers around the World and Its Impact in Restoration

Maria João Feio et al.

[3] Ecosystem Processes as Tools to Assess Stream Functional Integrity

Verónica Ferreira 1, Arturo Elosegi 2, Scott Tiegs 3, Daniel von Schiller 4 and Roger Young 5

  1. University of Coimbra, Portugal
  2. University of the Basque Country, Spain
  3. Oakland University, USA
  4. University of Barcelona, Spain
  5. Cawthron Institute, New Zealand

[4] Status and Prospects of Integration of DNA-Based Approaches in the Ecological Assessment of Rivers and Estuaries

Ana Filipa Filipe, Sofia Duarte, Filipe Costa, and et al.

 

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