E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Efficiency of Bank Filtration and Post-Treatment"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and Wastewater Treatment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Thomas Grischek

Division of Water Sciences, University of Applied Sciences Dresden, D-01069 Dresden, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +49 351 4623350
Interests: bank filtration; managed aquifer recharge; subsurface water treatment; iron and manganese removal
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chittaranjan Ray

Nebraska Water Center University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +01 402 4728427
Interests: low-cost water treatment; riverbank filtration; water and chemical transport in subsurface; ground water quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bank filtration (BF) schemes for the production of drinking water are increasingly challenged by new constituents of concern, such as organic micropollutants and pathogens in the source water and hydrological flow variations due to weather extremes. Bank filtration and new technology components are integrated and monitoring and operating regimes are adopted to further optimise water treatment in bank filtration schemes for these new requirements. The special issue will present first results from the EU-project AquaNES “Demonstrating synergies in combined natural and engineered processes for water treatment systems” (www.aquanes.eu). Papers from other research groups and especially water companies are invited covering the efficiency of bank filtration and post-treatment, advantages and limitations of combining natural and engineered processes or parameter-specific assessment of removal rates during bank filtration and further treatment. Additionally, contributions from Asia and Africa are invited dealing with feasibility, design or operation of BF schemes under specific site conditions. Papers dealing with energy efficiency and cost evaluation of BF are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Grischek
Prof. Dr. Chittaranjan Ray
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • River bank filtration (RBF)
  • Lake bank filtration (LBF)
  • Water quality changes
  • Post-treatment
  • Coupling BF and innovative post-treatment
  • Membrane filtration
  • Removal of bulk organics, trace organic compounds and pathogens

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle Capillary Nanofiltration under Anoxic Conditions as Post-Treatment after Bank Filtration
Water 2018, 10(11), 1599; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111599
Received: 28 September 2018 / Revised: 25 October 2018 / Accepted: 1 November 2018 / Published: 7 November 2018
PDF Full-text (16332 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bank filtration schemes for the production of drinking water are increasingly affected by constituents such as sulphate and organic micropollutants (OMP) in the source water. Within the European project AquaNES, the combination of bank filtration followed by capillary nanofiltration (capNF) is being demonstrated
[...] Read more.
Bank filtration schemes for the production of drinking water are increasingly affected by constituents such as sulphate and organic micropollutants (OMP) in the source water. Within the European project AquaNES, the combination of bank filtration followed by capillary nanofiltration (capNF) is being demonstrated as a potential solution for these challenges at pilot scale. As the bank filtration process reliably reduces total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biopolymers, algae and particles, membrane fouling is reduced resulting in long term operational stability of capNF systems. Iron and manganese fouling could be reduced with the possibility of anoxic operation of capNF. With the newly developed membrane module HF-TNF a good retention of sulphate (67–71%), selected micropollutants (e.g., EDTA: 84–92%) and hardness (41–55%) was achieved together with further removal of DOC (82–87%). Fouling and scaling could be handled with a good cleaning concept with acid and caustic. With the combination of bank filtration and capNF a possibility for treatment of anoxic well water without further pre-treatment was demonstrated and retention of selected current water pollutants was shown. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficiency of Bank Filtration and Post-Treatment)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Removal of Natural Organic Matter and Organic Micropollutants during Riverbank Filtration in Krajkowo, Poland
Water 2018, 10(10), 1457; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10101457
Received: 19 September 2018 / Revised: 4 October 2018 / Accepted: 11 October 2018 / Published: 16 October 2018
PDF Full-text (2351 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this article is to evaluate the removal of natural organic matter and micropollutants at a riverbank filtration site in Krajkowo, Poland, and its dependence on the distance between the wells and the river and related travel times. A high reduction
[...] Read more.
The aim of this article is to evaluate the removal of natural organic matter and micropollutants at a riverbank filtration site in Krajkowo, Poland, and its dependence on the distance between the wells and the river and related travel times. A high reduction in dissolved organic carbon (40–42%), chemical oxygen demand (65–70%), and colour (42–47%) was found in the riverbank filtration wells at a distance of 60–80 m from the river. A lower reduction in dissolved organic carbon (26%), chemical oxygen demand (42%), and colour (33%) was observed in a horizontal well. At greater distances of the wells from the river, the removal of pharmaceutical residues and pesticides was in the range of 52–66% and 55–66%, respectively. The highest removal of pharmaceutical residues and pesticides was found in a well located 250 m from the river and no micropollutants were detected in a well located 680 m from the river. The results provide evidence of the high efficacy of riverbank filtration for contaminant removal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficiency of Bank Filtration and Post-Treatment)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle The Impact of River Discharge and Water Temperature on Manganese Release from the Riverbed during Riverbank Filtration: A Case Study from Dresden, Germany
Water 2018, 10(10), 1476; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10101476
Received: 19 July 2018 / Revised: 10 October 2018 / Accepted: 15 October 2018 / Published: 19 October 2018
PDF Full-text (3656 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The climate-related variables, river discharge, and water temperature, are the main factors controlling the quality of the bank filtrate by affecting infiltration rates, travel times, and redox conditions. The impact of temperature and discharge on manganese release from a riverbed were assessed by
[...] Read more.
The climate-related variables, river discharge, and water temperature, are the main factors controlling the quality of the bank filtrate by affecting infiltration rates, travel times, and redox conditions. The impact of temperature and discharge on manganese release from a riverbed were assessed by water quality data from a monitoring transect at a riverbank filtration site in Dresden-Tolkewitz. Column experiments with riverbed material were used to assess the Mn release for four temperature and three discharge conditions, represented by varying infiltration rates. The observed Mn release was modeled as kinetic reactions via Monod-type rate formulations in PHREEQC. The temperature had a bigger impact than the infiltration rates on the Mn release. Infiltration rates of <0.3 m3/(m2·d) required temperatures >20 °C to trigger the Mn release. With increasing temperatures, the infiltration rates became less important. The modeled consumption rates of dissolved oxygen are in agreement with results from other bank filtration sites and are potentially suited for the further application of the given conditions. The determined Mn reduction rate constants were appropriate to simulate Mn release from the riverbed sediments but seemed not to be suited for simulations in which Mn reduction is likely to occur within the aquifer. Sequential extractions revealed a decrease of easily reducible Mn up to 25%, which was found to reflect the natural stratification within the riverbed, rather than a depletion of the Mn reservoir. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficiency of Bank Filtration and Post-Treatment)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top