Special Issue "Advances in Aquaculture Ecology Research"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water, Agriculture and Aquaculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2022 | Viewed by 2565

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Xiangli Tian
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Fisheries College, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China
Interests: aquaculture ecology; aquatic microbial ecology; probiotics for aquaculture
Prof. Dr. Li Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Fisheries College, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China
Interests: aquaculture ecology; water quality management; aquaculture ecosystems; traceability of aquaculture products; microbial community in aquaculture ecosystems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Worldwide demand for aquatic products is growing due to population growth and increased fish consumption, and this demand is expected to increase by 57% between 2005 and 2050 (FAO, 2014). However, aquaculture faces environmental challenges in its efforts to increase both the quantity and quality of production without increasing the negative externalities. Aquaculture ecology belongs to the category of applied ecology. It is the science of the interaction between environment and commercial aquatic organisms as well as their farming activities, and the principles for the establishment and management of aquaculture systems. Its basic goal is to provide a theoretical basis and key technical supports for the sustainable development of aquaculture industry, i.e., to protect the ecological environment of farming waters, rationalize the use of resources, and improve economic efficiency. Aquaculture ecology is closely related to the development of the aquaculture industry. On one hand, the technicalization of its theoretical achievements can correspondingly promote the development of the aquaculture industry; on the other hand, its development is strongly driven by the expansion of the industrial scale and the increase in farming species. For this Special Issue of Water, manuscripts (original research and reviews) are solicited that describe advances in individual ecology of commercial aquatic organisms, ecology of aquaculture systems, interaction between aquaculture activities and the environment, structure of function of the microbial community, principles of environment management in aquaculture ecosystems, etc. in recent decades.

Prof. Dr. Xiangli Tian
Prof. Dr. Li Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ecophysiology of commercial aquatic organisms
  • water quality
  • structure and function of microbial community
  • ecological model
  • aquaculture environment interactions
  • environment management
  • aquaculture ecosystems
  • sustainability of aquaculture systems

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Protein Level on the Production and Growth Performance of Juvenile Chinese Mitten Crab (Eriocheir sinensis) and Environmental Parameters in Paddy Fields
Water 2022, 14(12), 1941; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14121941 - 16 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Rice–crab co-culture systems represent integrated agriculture–aquaculture systems developed in China over the last 30 years. The rice–crab co-culture area comprised approximately 1.386 × 105 hm2 in 2019. However, there is no specific feed designed for Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis [...] Read more.
Rice–crab co-culture systems represent integrated agriculture–aquaculture systems developed in China over the last 30 years. The rice–crab co-culture area comprised approximately 1.386 × 105 hm2 in 2019. However, there is no specific feed designed for Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis) cultured in this system until now. In this study, we investigated feed formulae for the nutritional requirements of Chinese mitten crab in this mode. The control group was not fed with any artificial feed (Co), and the experimental groups were fed with three different feeds of 15% (T15), 30% (T30), or 45% (T45) protein content, respectively. Growth performance variations in E. sinensis were investigated along with water quality, phytoplankton, zooplankton, aquatic vascular plants, and benthic animals in the paddy fields to determine the effect of crabs and their diet on the paddy ecosystem. Dietary protein levels had no significant effect on water quality. The biomass and species of phytoplankton, zooplankton, aquatic vascular plants, and zoobenthos in the paddy field were affected by crabs and their diet. Morphological parameters of crabs were significantly more pronounced in the high-protein group than in the other groups. However, the T45 diet negatively affected production by increasing feed costs, causing precocious puberty and inducing water eutrophication. In conclusion, adding a 15% protein compound feed can meet the nutritional needs of crabs, reduce culture costs, and improve water quality. The discharged water had low ammonia nitrogen and nitrite content and no eutrophication occurred, so the water could be recycled. These findings provide a scientific reference for supporting rice and fish co-cultivation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Aquaculture Ecology Research)
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Article
The Effects of Different Carbon Sources on the Production Environment and Breeding Parameters of Litopenaeus vannamei
Water 2021, 13(24), 3584; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243584 - 14 Dec 2021
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Abstract
This study investigated the effect of different carbon sources on water quality, ammonia removal pathways, the bacterial community, and the production of Litopenaeus vannamei in outdoor culture tanks. Three systems were established: a clear water system (CW) and biofloc technology (BFT) systems with [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effect of different carbon sources on water quality, ammonia removal pathways, the bacterial community, and the production of Litopenaeus vannamei in outdoor culture tanks. Three systems were established: a clear water system (CW) and biofloc technology (BFT) systems with added molasses (M-BF) or poly (3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydrovaleric acid) (PHBV) (P-BF). The average pH, total alkalinity, total organic carbon, biofloc volume, chlorophyll a, nitrite, nitrate, total nitrogen, and nitrification rate were significantly different among the treatments. Microbial composition varied and different dominant taxa were identified in the treatments by linear discriminant analysis effect size. Redundancy analysis indicated that the water quality parameters affected the distribution of the microbial community. Moreover, the genus Leucothrix was closely related to the M-BF treatment. Chemoheterotrophy and aerobic chemoheterotrophy were the most abundant functions in all treatments. A comparison of functions using BugBase indicated that the relative abundance of several functions such as biofilm formation, stress tolerance and functions related to anaerobic processes increased in the M-BF treatment. The specific growth rate, growth rate, and survival rate of shrimp were significantly higher in the P-BF system than in the CW system and the feed conversion ratio in the BFT treatments was significantly lower than that in the CW system. Overall, adding carbon sources affected water quality, microbial community, and shrimp performance. The results show that PHBV is a good alternative to carbon sources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Aquaculture Ecology Research)
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Article
Effects of Desiccation, Water Velocity, and Nitrogen Limitation on the Growth and Nutrient Removal of Neoporphyra haitanensis and Neoporphyra dentata (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)
Water 2021, 13(19), 2745; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13192745 - 02 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Seaweeds have been verified to effectively reduce the nutrients of aquaculture wastewater, and to increase the economic output when commercially valuable species are utilized. Pyropia/Porphyra/Neopyropia/Neoporphyra species are important seafood resources globally, and their growth and bioremediation capacities are affected by diverse biotic and [...] Read more.
Seaweeds have been verified to effectively reduce the nutrients of aquaculture wastewater, and to increase the economic output when commercially valuable species are utilized. Pyropia/Porphyra/Neopyropia/Neoporphyra species are important seafood resources globally, and their growth and bioremediation capacities are affected by diverse biotic and abiotic stressors. In this study, we investigated the effects of desiccation (0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 h of air exposure), water velocity (0.1, 0.2, and 0.5 m s1), and the nitrogen limitation period (1, 2, and 3 d) on the relative growth rates (RGR) and nutrient removal rates of Neoporphyrahaitanensis and Neoporphyradentata. The RGRs and NO3-N removal rates of the two species decreased significantly with increasing desiccation periods. A higher water velocity of 0.5 m s1 had a greater negative impact on the RGRs and NO3-N and PO4-P removal rates than 0.1 and 0.2 m s1. N. haitanensis exhibited a greater tolerance to water motion than N. dentata. Additionally, the RGRs and NO3-N and PO4-P removal rates were significantly different among the nitrogen limitation periods. N. haitanensis and N. dentata exhibited different nitrogen usage strategies after nitrogen limitation and recovery. These results provide valuable information relating to the excessive nutrient removal from aquaculture wastewater by Neoporphyra species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Aquaculture Ecology Research)
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