Study on Soil Hydrological Process, Mechanisms and Effects

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Water".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2024) | Viewed by 1667

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, China
Interests: soil hydrology; hydrological process; model simulation; rock fragment; subsurface flow; land use; nitrogen cycle; biogeochemical process

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor Assistant
Tianjin Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Environment, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin, China
Interests: water chemistry and catchment weathering; coupling cycles of sulfur and carbon; water quality evaluation; microbial cycling of heavy metals and nutrients; sulfur cycles in wetlands

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor Assistant
Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, China
Interests: nutrient cycling; climate change; human activity; water–soil–atmosphere; ecosystem assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The soil hydrological process plays a crucial role in linking different spheres of the Earth’s critical zone, including the lithosphere, hydrosphere, pedosphere, atmosphere and biosphere, and serves as a primary driving force for material and energy exchanges among these spheres. Understanding the spatio-temporal patterns of the soil hydrological process and their critical regulating mechanisms is therefore a pressing issue in fields such as hydropedology, biogeochemistry and critical zone science.

The soil hydrological process can be categorized into two aspects: the static aspect, represented by soil water content and potential; and the dynamic aspect, represented by soil water movement. Studies of the static aspect mostly focus on the spatio-temporal changes in soil water content at various geographical units or spatial scales (e.g., hillslope, watershed, region and continent) and those occurring during specific climate events (e.g., prolonged drought and extreme rainfall), examining the mechanisms that control these changes and the induced ecological and environmental effects, such as the influences on vegetation growth and grain yield. Studies of the dynamic aspect mostly concern the occurrence process (flow flux and rate) and mechanism of different water flow phenomena (e.g., infiltration, percolation, lateral subsurface flow, preferential flow), model simulations of these processes, and the environmental issues triggered by water movement, such as soil erosion and non-point nutrient loss.

Although the soil hydrological process, mechanisms and effects have been widely studied in previously published research, systematic and comprehensive investigations are still required. Further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms that control soil water content across different spatial scales, the occurrence thresholds and mechanisms of the lateral subsurface flow and preferential flow, and to develop improved methods and models for monitoring subsurface flow processes (especially lateral subsurface flow and preferential flow). Additionally, the effects of the soil hydrological process on vegetation growth, greenhouse gas emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loss, water pollution and other eco-environmental issues have become research hotspots.

This Special Issue aims to gather high-quality papers emphasizing different aspects and findings related to the soil hydrological process, mechanisms and effects, with a particular focus on the areas mentioned above.

We are pleased to invite you to submit your most recent research contributions, which will go through a peer-review process performed by independent reviewers. Original case studies and review papers are invited for publication in this Special Issue.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Xiaoming Lai
Guest Editor

Prof. Dr. Wei Zhang
Dr. Zhuojun Zhang
Guest Editor Assistants

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • soil water content
  • subsurface flow
  • hydrological process
  • model simulation
  • spatio-temporal variability
  • controlling mechanism
  • watershed
  • spatial scale
  • nutrient loss
  • nutrient cycling
  • ecological effects
  • greenhouse gas emission

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 2401 KiB  
Article
Impact of Diverse Rainfall Patterns and Their Interaction on Soil and Water Loss in a Small Watershed within a Typical Low Hilly Region
by Yuhao Zhou, Guangcheng Shao and Yanhua Jiang
Water 2024, 16(3), 372; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16030372 - 23 Jan 2024
Viewed by 627
Abstract
Assessing the impact of varied rainfall patterns on soil and water loss within a hilly watershed over an extended temporal scope holds paramount importance in comprehending regional runoff and sediment traits. This study utilized continuous rainfall and sediment data spanning from 2013 to [...] Read more.
Assessing the impact of varied rainfall patterns on soil and water loss within a hilly watershed over an extended temporal scope holds paramount importance in comprehending regional runoff and sediment traits. This study utilized continuous rainfall and sediment data spanning from 2013 to 2021, and the K-means clustering method was employed to analyze rainfall types. Subsequently, the rain-type characteristics underwent further analysis through LSD, and a multiple linear regression equation was formulated. The result showed that: within the Qiaotou small basin, rainfall, maximum rainfall intensity within 30 min (I30), and rainfall erosivity exhibited notable effects on sediment yield and loss. The water-sediment attributes of 305 rainfall events were characterized by rainfall below 100 mm, I30 of less than 35 mm/h, a runoff coefficient below 0.5, and sediment content under 0.6 g/L. According to the characteristics of different rainfall types and the degree of influence on water and sediment in small watersheds, 305 rainfall events in the basin were divided into three types by the K-means clustering analysis method: A (heavy rainfall, moderate rain), B (small rainfall, light rain), and C (medium rainfall, heavy rain). The most frequent rain type observed was B, followed by C, while A had the lowest frequency. Despite the lower intensity of B-type rainfall, it holds significant regional importance. Conversely, C-type rainfall, although intense and short, serves as the primary source of sediment production. The multiple regression equation effectively models both sediment yield modulus and flood peak discharge, exhibiting an R2 coefficient exceeding 0.80, signifying significance. This equation enables the quantitative calculation of pertinent indicators. Sediment yield modulus primarily relies on sediment concentration, runoff depth, and rainfall, while peak discharge is significantly influenced by runoff depth, sediment concentration, and I30. Furthermore, the efficacy of various soil and water conservation measures for flow and sediment reduction correlates with I30. Overall, the impact of different measures on reducing flow and sediment increases with a higher I30, accompanied by a reduced fluctuation range. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Study on Soil Hydrological Process, Mechanisms and Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 2440 KiB  
Article
Identification of the Representative Point for Soil Moisture Storage Using a Precipitation History Model
by Sanghyun Kim and Eunhyung Lee
Water 2023, 15(22), 3921; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15223921 - 09 Nov 2023
Viewed by 769
Abstract
Soil water storage is an essential variable in hydrological processes at the hillslope scale. This study proposed models for predicting soil water based on the precipitation history. According to the mathematical analysis of soil water storage on the hillslope scale, hydrological fluxes can [...] Read more.
Soil water storage is an essential variable in hydrological processes at the hillslope scale. This study proposed models for predicting soil water based on the precipitation history. According to the mathematical analysis of soil water storage on the hillslope scale, hydrological fluxes can be effectively expressed in terms of the weighted time series of precipitation and evapotranspiration. Moreover, the impact of evapotranspiration on soil water storage was incorporated into the model structure as an autoregressive process. A new soil water prediction model was developed through the integration of the soil moisture stochastic process into the structure of a precipitation-based model for the hillslope scale. Intensive soil moisture and rainfall data collected over two years were then used to test the performance of the developed models for two different hillslopes. The proposed model exhibited a better ability to find representative points for soil water storage than either existing precipitation-based models or the temporal stability method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Study on Soil Hydrological Process, Mechanisms and Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop