Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Oceans and Coastal Zones".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 13910

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Fisheries College, Jimei University, Xiamen 361021, China
Interests: recreational fisheries; ecology; restoration; fishery management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan
Interests: ecology; restoration; conservation

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Guest Editor
College of Ocean Science and Resource, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan
Interests: ecology, fishery management

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Guest Editor
Fisheries College, Jimei University, Xiamen 361021, China
Interests: marine fishery; aquatic animal immunization; disease control

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Guest Editor
Fisheries College, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan 316022, China
Interests: marine fishery; recreational fisheries; fishing gear and fishing method; fish behavior

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coasts, including estuaries, wetlands, mangroves, etc., have long been recognized for their critical role in providing and maintaining the ecological services on which we depend. Even so, in the face of human development, the quality and quantity of coastal ecology worldwide are declining. Although some estuaries, wetlands, and mangroves are protected, considerable investment in academic research is still required. At the same time, due to the development of fish resources (FAO, 2020), it is also affected by the above-mentioned habitats. In order to take into account ongoing climate change and its impact on fishery resources, the identification and adoption of sustainable management practices for fish stocks have become global priorities. The stock status of some selected fish species will be assessed by an expert working group based on country-specific requirements. These academic studies include: primarily, the economic (and/or ecological) importance of each species. Assessments are based on available data, the best available methods and/or biological knowledge about the species under consideration. Once inventory status has been assessed, decision makers are responsible for defining, evaluating and adopting management measures. Recently, interest in multi-species and multi-trophic models has grown significantly, especially regarding the growing importance of assessing the health of different ecosystems. In this context, it is believed that for the Special Issue, it is very important to determine the ecological status of estuaries, wetlands, mangroves, etc., to link multi-species fisheries management models, trophic relationships of exploited species and ecosystem responses to fishing pressure. As well as other interacting drivers of polytrophic levels (e.g., climate change), identify the key environmental factors that drive the spatial distribution and habitat use of species. This era has also fostered extraordinary collaboration among ecologists, environmental scientists, engineers, government officials, wildlife biologists and non-government officials.

Prof. Dr. Ta-Jen Chu
Prof. Dr. Hwey-Lian Hsieh
Prof. Dr. Chenghsin Liao
Prof. Dr. Wenshu Huang
Prof. Dr. Weiguo Qian
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • estuaries ecology and management
  • wetlands protection and management
  • mangroves restoration and construction
  • fishery resource assessment
  • coastal fishery management
  • fishery management policy
  • coral ecology and protection
  • ecosystem services
  • coastal culture and aquaculture
  • marine farming and construction

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 5183 KiB  
Article
The Long-Term Dynamics of Walleye Pollock Stocks in Relation to Oceanographic Changes in the East Sea
by Hae Kun Jung, Jong Won Park, Jae Hyeong Yang, Joo Myun Park, In Seong Han and Chung Il Lee
Water 2024, 16(7), 955; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16070955 - 26 Mar 2024
Viewed by 489
Abstract
The decline in walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) stocks in Korean waters is a major concern for fishery conservation and management. However, the causes and mechanisms of this collapse remain unclear. This study investigated the complex dynamics influencing the abundance of walleye [...] Read more.
The decline in walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) stocks in Korean waters is a major concern for fishery conservation and management. However, the causes and mechanisms of this collapse remain unclear. This study investigated the complex dynamics influencing the abundance of walleye pollocks in the East Sea of Korea over several decades, by analyzing data from long-term changes in biological factors including composition of length and sex, catch, and oceanographic condition. Prior to the mid-1980s, the catch ratio of juveniles was higher than that of adults, with a higher proportion of females in both juvenile and adult catches compared to males. Especially, high fishing pressure on female individuals can be an important factor contributing to declining reproduction. Consequently, after the mid-1980s, there was a sudden decline in juvenile pollock catches. In the late 1980s, there was a rapid increase in sea surface temperature (SST) in the spawning grounds, resulting in a decrease in both the duration of suitable temperature for spawning and the regional proportion for suitable spawning conditions. Consequently, the decline in pollock stocks after the late 1980s due to overfishing of pollock in the mid-1980s was further exacerbated by the effects of SST warming after the late 1980s. These findings highlight the impact of overfishing and environmental factors on pollock stocks and indicate the need for appropriate fishery management practices to ensure the sustainable use of fishery resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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14 pages, 1230 KiB  
Article
Comparison of the Meiofauna and Marine Nematode Communities before and after Removal of Spartina alterniflora in the Mangrove Wetland of Quanzhou Bay, Fujian Province
by Ming-Cheng Hu, Yu-Qing Guo, Yi-Jia Shih, Kai Liu, Chun-Xue Li, Fen-Fen Ji and Ta-Jen Chu
Water 2023, 15(21), 3829; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15213829 - 02 Nov 2023
Viewed by 794
Abstract
The invasion of Spartina alterniflora is one of the main threats faced by mangrove wetlands in Quanzhou Bay, Fujian. To effectively manage S. alterniflora, mangrove plants (Kandelia obovata, Aegiceras corniculatum, Bruguiera gymnorhiza, Rhizophora stylosa, and Avicennia marina) were [...] Read more.
The invasion of Spartina alterniflora is one of the main threats faced by mangrove wetlands in Quanzhou Bay, Fujian. To effectively manage S. alterniflora, mangrove plants (Kandelia obovata, Aegiceras corniculatum, Bruguiera gymnorhiza, Rhizophora stylosa, and Avicennia marina) were used to replace it in 2022 to restore the wetland ecosystem. Samples of meiofauna and marine nematodes were collected four times, including in September 2022 (before the removal of S. alterniflora), October 2022 (after removal), and December 2022 and March 2023 (after planting mangrove plants). This paper investigates changes in the composition, abundance, and biomass of meiofauna in different time periods, with a specific focus on comparing the community structure and biodiversity indices of marine nematodes in S. alterniflora and mangrove habitats. The results indicate that among the five meiofauna groups identified, marine nematodes account for 92.91%, 91.91%, 92.03%, and 85.92% of the total meiofauna abundance in the respective study periods. In the S. alterniflora habitat in September, marine nematodes were identified belonging to 12 families and 20 genera, of which 6 genera were dominant (percentage ≥ 5%). They were Ptycholaimellus, Parodontophora, Terschellingia, Halichoanolaimus, Metachromadora, and Parasphaerolaimus. In the mangrove habitat in December, marine nematodes were identified belonging to 15 families and 23 genera, with 6 genera being dominant, namely Daptonema, Admirandus, Parodontophora, Ptycholaimellus, Terschellingia, and Anoplostoma. Comparing the marine nematode communities in the two habitats, the mangrove habitat exhibits higher diversity than the S. alterniflora habitat. There was a change in the dominant genera, and their dominance has decreased. The dominant genera of marine nematodes found in both habitats are common and widely distributed groups. The changes in the abundance of meiofauna and the community structure of marine nematodes following the restoration of the S. alterniflora habitat by planting mangroves provide valuable insights for ecological monitoring after restoration measures in estuarine wetland conservation areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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14 pages, 4297 KiB  
Article
Frog Crabs (Ranina ranina) in South Penghu Marine National Park, Taiwan: A Case Study of Population Dynamics and Recreational Fishing Sustainable Development
by Chun-Han Shih
Water 2023, 15(20), 3689; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15203689 - 22 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1032
Abstract
The frog crab/red frog crab (Ranina ranina), a species of symbolic significance in the South Penghu Marine National Park, Taiwan, represents a collaboration between marine conservation and recreational fishing under Sustainable Development Goal 14 (SDG14) as defined by the United Nations. [...] Read more.
The frog crab/red frog crab (Ranina ranina), a species of symbolic significance in the South Penghu Marine National Park, Taiwan, represents a collaboration between marine conservation and recreational fishing under Sustainable Development Goal 14 (SDG14) as defined by the United Nations. From 2020 to 2021, the growth and reproduction of R. ranina were examined in the Taiwan Strait, off the coast of Taiwan. Samples were gathered from the South Penghu Marine National Park water square in Penghu County using red frog crab nets. A comparative analysis of the existing biological literature has revealed that the spawning season of R. ranina differs among populations, as evidenced by varying percentages of ovigerous females: 10–90% in Hachijojima, Japan; 86% in Molokai, Hawaii; 1–17% in the Andaman Sea, Thailand; more than 50% in Mindanao, Philippines; and 30–80% in New South Wales, Australia, and Taiwan. Additionally, analysis of the reproductive patterns, growth parameters, and spawning seasons of R. ranina can serve as a scientific foundation for the implementation of SDG14 as well as the formulation of conservation principles for resource management. This research has underscored the essential role of localized conservation strategies that cohesively resonate with broader global sustainability goals, offering a strategic framework for effective marine resource management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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14 pages, 2742 KiB  
Article
Use of δ13C and δ15N as Indicators to Evaluate the Influence of Sewage on Organic Matter in the Zhangjiang Mangrove–Estuary Ecosystem, Southeastern China
by Danyang Li, Jinpei Yan, Zhiqiang Lu, Tianshu Chu, Jun Li and Tajen Chu
Water 2023, 15(20), 3660; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15203660 - 19 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 881
Abstract
Organic matter in the productive mangrove–estuary ecosystem plays an important role in global climate changes. In recent years, the eutrophication in such areas caused by anthropogenic inputs of sewage has been revealed, highlighting the need to understand its influence on organic matter. In [...] Read more.
Organic matter in the productive mangrove–estuary ecosystem plays an important role in global climate changes. In recent years, the eutrophication in such areas caused by anthropogenic inputs of sewage has been revealed, highlighting the need to understand its influence on organic matter. In this study, δ13C and δ15N were used to reveal the effects of sewage on organic matters in the Zhangjiang mangrove–estuary ecosystem. Our results indicate that sewage contributed the most of the total particulate organic matter (41%) in the Zhangjiang estuary, while mangrove plants contributed most of the soil organic matter (45%) in the neighboring Yunxiao mangrove. Phytoplankton was another important source of organic matter, accounting for about 21.8% and 49.8% of the particulate and soil organic matter, respectively. Sewage was also a major source of dissolved inorganic nitrogen, providing 28.9%, 12.2%, and 100% of the total NO3, NO2, and NH4+ in the Zhangjiang estuary, respectively. This may be the major reason for the productive phytoplankton here, which contributed 21.8% and 49.8% of the total particulate and soil organic matter in the study area. Our results reveal the direct contribution and the potential effects of sewage on the contents and bioavailability of organic matter in mangrove–estuary ecosystems, providing new insights into understanding the response of coastal areas to the influence of human activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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14 pages, 1979 KiB  
Article
Effects of Enrofloxacin and Ciprofloxacin on Growth and Toxin Production of Microcystis aeruginosa
by Yu Xia, Qin-Ming Xie and Ta-Jen Chu
Water 2023, 15(20), 3580; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15203580 - 13 Oct 2023
Viewed by 965
Abstract
Microcystis aeruginosa is a common cyanobacterium found in water blooms and often causes ecological harm. Antibiotics are also increasingly used for the prevention and treatment of bacterial infections in aquaculture. However, since most antibiotics cannot be fully metabolized, they enter the water environment [...] Read more.
Microcystis aeruginosa is a common cyanobacterium found in water blooms and often causes ecological harm. Antibiotics are also increasingly used for the prevention and treatment of bacterial infections in aquaculture. However, since most antibiotics cannot be fully metabolized, they enter the water environment and cause ecological impacts. In this paper, the effects of the two fluoroquinolone antibiotics (enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin) on the population density and microcystins (MCs) production of M. aeruginosa were studied. It is of great significance for the ecological risk assessment of antibiotics in the water environment. The results showed that the 96h EC50 values of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin to M. aeruginosa were 56.10 mg/L and 49.80 mg/L, respectively, and the toxicity of ciprofloxacin to M. aeruginosa was slightly stronger than that of enrofloxacin. With the increase in the two antibiotic concentration, the growth inhibition rate (IR) increased, but when the concentration reached a certain level, the IR would reach its threshold. Long-term exposure to low concentrations of these two antibiotics is not only more likely to lead to the outbreak of M. aeruginosa, but also increase its toxin production capacity. The highest contents of MCs in enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin groups were 95.539 μg/g and 93.720 μg/g, respectively. The MCs value of these three enrofloxacin treatment groups was more than above 51.8 times that of control group (CK) on the 4th day; from 8th day to 14th day, the MCs value of these three enrofloxacin treatment groups was more than above 3.2 times that of CK group. For ciprofloxacin, the MCs value of the treatment group was more than 64.98 times that of the CK group on the 4th day, and from 8th day to 14th day, the MCs value of the treatment group was more than 2.7 times that of the CK group. These findings provide crucial management rationale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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21 pages, 14629 KiB  
Article
The Species Diversity of the Genus Echinogorgia in Xiamen Bay and Its New Record in China
by Yun-Pei Wang, Jing Yang, Ta-Jen Chu and Jia-Ying Liu
Water 2023, 15(20), 3547; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15203547 - 11 Oct 2023
Viewed by 983
Abstract
The rapid reduction in coral reefs worldwide has led to increasing attention toward protecting and restoring coral reef ecosystems. Coral reefs not only have a rich diversity of coral species, but they can also provide important products and services for human beings. One [...] Read more.
The rapid reduction in coral reefs worldwide has led to increasing attention toward protecting and restoring coral reef ecosystems. Coral reefs not only have a rich diversity of coral species, but they can also provide important products and services for human beings. One type of coral, Echinogorgia, has important scientific research value and application prospects. To understand the diversity of coral species, diving surveys were conducted in Xiamen Bay in 2017 and 2021, and a total of 928 samples were collected. Taxonomic research was conducted using methods such as morphological identification through electron microscopy. Specific phylogenetic trees of the COI gene, mtMuts gene, and ITS1 gene were analyzed. There were 47 specimens of Echinogorgia coral included among 928 samples. Fifteen species of Echinogorgia were identified, including Echinogorgia ramosa, Echinogorgia flexilis, Echinogorgia russelli, Echinogorgia ramulosa, and Echinogorgia gracilima (which represent the newly recorded species in the waters of China). This study increases the species diversity records in China and contributes to new geographical distribution information of Echinogorgia worldwide. The primary data also serve as the baseline data for long-term biomonitoring programs to estimate the status of octocorals in Xiamen Bay. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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15 pages, 1729 KiB  
Article
Morphometric Differentiation of the Swimming Crab Portunus sanguinolentus (Herbst, 1783) Populations in East Asia: Implications for Stock Identification and Management
by Wei-Chieh Kao, Ping-Hung Chang, Chun-Han Shih, Po-Cheng Chen, Tzong-Der Tzeng, Yu-San Han and Yu-Ming Lu
Water 2023, 15(19), 3335; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15193335 - 22 Sep 2023
Viewed by 938
Abstract
Morphometric disparities were employed to characterize the geographical variations in and elucidate the phylogeography of Portunus sanguinolentus in East Asia. In this study, a comprehensive assessment was undertaken based on measurements from 833 individual crabs. These crabs were sampled from eight distinct locations, [...] Read more.
Morphometric disparities were employed to characterize the geographical variations in and elucidate the phylogeography of Portunus sanguinolentus in East Asia. In this study, a comprehensive assessment was undertaken based on measurements from 833 individual crabs. These crabs were sampled from eight distinct locations, namely Kyushu (KS), Fuzhou (FZ), Yilan (YL), Xiamen (XM), Tainan (TN), Hong Kong (HK), Vietnam (VN), and Singapore (SG). Twelve morphometric measurements were standardized based on size using the allometric method. A cluster analysis and a canonical variate analysis (CVA) were then conducted for a data analysis. Randomization tests were subsequently performed to validate the morphometric differences observed among the groups. The analytical results classified the eight sampled populations into at least two distinct clusters. The first cluster included three samples from China (specifically FZ, XM, and HK), while the second cluster consisted of samples from East Asia (including KS, YL, TN, VN, and SG). The CVA revealed a tripartite division into three groups: the mainland China group (FZ, XM, and HK), the Kuroshio group (KS, YL, and TN), and the Southeast Asia group (VN and SG). The observed morphometric variations between these broad groups were statistically significant for both genders. These differences may be attributed to evolutionary origins, geographical events, or environmental adaptations. This study highlights the effectiveness of morphometric techniques in providing comprehensive insights into species delimitation and philogeographic relationships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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17 pages, 2255 KiB  
Article
Optimizing the Fishery and Solar Power Symbiosis Model for Sustainable Marine Resource Management: Evaluating the Effects of Solar Shading on the Growth and Water Quality of Litopenaeus vannamei and Chanos chanos
by Ping-Hung Chang, Chun-Han Shih and Wei-Chieh Kao
Water 2023, 15(18), 3260; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15183260 - 13 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1182
Abstract
The stable supply of renewable energy is imperative in many countries lacking domestic energy production. Thus, green energy will likely dominate future energy development trends. Taiwan’s thriving aquaculture industry presents an opportunity to integrate fisheries with electricity generation by transforming aquaculture into a [...] Read more.
The stable supply of renewable energy is imperative in many countries lacking domestic energy production. Thus, green energy will likely dominate future energy development trends. Taiwan’s thriving aquaculture industry presents an opportunity to integrate fisheries with electricity generation by transforming aquaculture into a symbiotic fishery–photovoltaic structure that provides stable, clean energy with potential economic benefits. This integrated model offers several advantages, such as temperature regulation and mobility, without needing to use land. However, several unexplored issues warrant further investigation. This study assessed the solar shading effects within the symbiotic fishery–photovoltaic model by comparing the growth of Litopenaeus vannamei and Chanos chanos under mixed cultivation conditions in an integrated system versus traditional fishponds. No substantial growth differences occurred for C. chanos between the systems. However, the body weight of L. vannamei was notably higher in traditional ponds versus the integrated system. Beyond evaluating the species’ growth, the aquatic environments were compared between the systems. The integrated model maintained a higher dissolved oxygen content and had lower ammonia and nitrite nitrogen levels than traditional co-cultivation. Moreover, this study provides valuable insights into the impacts of solar shading on the symbiotic fishery–photovoltaic model, shedding light on its potential benefits for nations lacking self-produced energy. Fishery–electricity symbiosis is a mutually beneficial integration of aquaculture and photovoltaics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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25 pages, 5567 KiB  
Article
Revealing the Current Situation and Strategies of Marine Ranching Development in China Based on Knowledge Graphs
by Yong-He Chen, Yong-Jing Chen, Yue-Ping Zhang and Ta-Jen Chu
Water 2023, 15(15), 2740; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15152740 - 28 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1595
Abstract
In recent years, marine ranching, as an emerging model of marine industry development, has become a research hotspot in the marine industries of many countries. A marine ranching is an ecological aquaculture fishing ground formed within a specific sea area to increase and [...] Read more.
In recent years, marine ranching, as an emerging model of marine industry development, has become a research hotspot in the marine industries of many countries. A marine ranching is an ecological aquaculture fishing ground formed within a specific sea area to increase and restore fishery resources, combined with artificial nurseries and the construction of fish reefs. As a major maritime country, China attaches great importance to the construction of marine ranching and supports them as an important means of conserving aquatic resources, providing fishermen with jobs, and building a marine ecological civilization. Bibliometric methods are considered to be useful tools that can provide a macroscopic overview of large amounts of academic literature, identify research priorities, and track the evolution of science and technology. In this paper, a comprehensive analysis was carried out using three methods: bibliometric analysis, visual analysis with CiteSpace software, and Excel pivoting, presented in the form of visual graphs and data charts. A total of 293 and 522 academic journal papers searched in the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and the Web of Science (WoS) core databases were used, respectively, and to summarize the current status of construction of national marine ranching demonstration areas in China, this study also provides an overview of China’s policies on the development of marine ranching over the past two decades. It clarifies the current status, research hotspots and future directions of marine ranching research, and provides a reference for the evolution process and theoretical research of marine ranching in the future. At present, China is focusing on the development of modernized “all-area” marine ranching which is “ecological, precise, intelligent and integrated”. Obviously, it cannot be overemphasized that smart marine ranching will become a research hotspot in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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20 pages, 9012 KiB  
Article
The Transformation of Coastal Governance, from Human Ecology to Local State, in the Jimei Peninsula, Xiamen, China
by Zhe Zou, Yu-Yan Zhang, Su-Hsin Lee and Shu-Chen Tsai
Water 2023, 15(14), 2659; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15142659 - 22 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1612
Abstract
The coastal zone, situated at the sensitive interface between land and sea, serves as a pivotal area of human economic activities. As one of China’s economic special zones, Xiamen exemplifies the comprehensive trajectory of coastal governance in China. However, there are still research [...] Read more.
The coastal zone, situated at the sensitive interface between land and sea, serves as a pivotal area of human economic activities. As one of China’s economic special zones, Xiamen exemplifies the comprehensive trajectory of coastal governance in China. However, there are still research gaps in the human ecological transitions in coastal governance. This study adopts the research approach of scale politics and the local state, with the purpose of explaining the governance model of the coastal zone transformation. Sources include interviews with fishers, direct observation, participant observation, and content analysis. The study demonstrates how local governments strive to maximize the profits of scenic tourism, by (1) appropriating the international scale, absorbing international aid and technical assistance; (2) confiscating the access rights of the coastal zone; and (3) vertically integrating all relationships from local to international organizations to create new governance patterns. Xiamen’s coastal landscape not only presents the meltdown of human ecology under local state governance but also demonstrates a keen adaptation to the shifting dynamics of the international tourism market. From the theoretical perspective of the local state, this paper effectively points out the political characteristics of local government and bridges the loss of cultural ecology in the transformation of governance patterns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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16 pages, 1948 KiB  
Article
Sustainability Perspective of Minjiang Estuary Coastal Fisheries Management—Estimation of Fish Richness
by Jia-Qiao Wang, Jun Li, Yi-Jia Shih, Liang-Min Huang, Xin-Ruo Wang and Ta-Jen Chu
Water 2023, 15(14), 2648; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15142648 - 21 Jul 2023
Viewed by 813
Abstract
Species richness is the most basic concept of diversity and is crucial to biodiversity conservation and sustainable fisheries. To understand the fish species richness of the Minjiang Estuary and its adjacent waters, eight documents and surveyed data were collected and compared from 1990–2021. [...] Read more.
Species richness is the most basic concept of diversity and is crucial to biodiversity conservation and sustainable fisheries. To understand the fish species richness of the Minjiang Estuary and its adjacent waters, eight documents and surveyed data were collected and compared from 1990–2021. To obtain suitable analysis data, the content of the data was compared and evaluated. Explore the suitability of data based on several criteria. Among them, the bottom trawling survey carried out in 2006–2007, and non-parametric estimation methods such as Chao 2, Jackknife 1, Jackknife 2 and Bootstrap were used to estimate the fish species richness. The results of this case show that a total of 153 species of fish were caught in the trawling survey in the fourth quarter, belonging to 14 orders, 57 families and 101 genera. The 2006–2007 cruise is more complete for studying species richness. The Estimable expectations of fish species richness are: 250 (Chao 2), 204 (Jackknief 1), 241 (Jackknief 2) and 174 (Bootstrap). The number of fish species was significantly higher in summer and autumn than winter and spring. To manage fishery resources and sustainability in the sea area of Fujian Province, biological information and stock assessment are required. This meaningful information, especially for endemic and economically important species such as can set a baseline. Once species change exceeds the baseline range, it provides decision-making basis for marine biodiversity conservation and fisheries management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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18 pages, 11061 KiB  
Article
Fish Diversity Monitoring Using Environmental DNA Techniques in the Clarion–Clipperton Zone of the Pacific Ocean
by Weiyi He, Lei Wang, Danyun Ou, Weiwen Li, Hao Huang, Rimei Ou, Jinli Qiu, Lei Cai, Lianghua Lin and Yanxu Zhang
Water 2023, 15(11), 2123; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15112123 - 02 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1549
Abstract
Marine fish populations have suffered the consequences of overfishing for a long time, leading to a loss in biodiversity. Traditional methods have been historically used to survey fish diversity but are limited to commercial species, particularly on the high seas. Environmental DNA (eDNA) [...] Read more.
Marine fish populations have suffered the consequences of overfishing for a long time, leading to a loss in biodiversity. Traditional methods have been historically used to survey fish diversity but are limited to commercial species, particularly on the high seas. Environmental DNA (eDNA) has been successfully used to monitor biodiversity in aquatic environments. In this study, we monitored fish diversity in the Clarion–Clipperton Zone (CCZ) of the Eastern Pacific Ocean using eDNA metabarcoding. Our results identified 2 classes, 35 orders, 64 families, and 87 genera. The genera Mugil, Scomberomorus, and Scomber had high relative abundance in the mesopelagic and demersal zone. Fish diversity varied with sampling sites, and the greatest number of species was found at a depth of 2500 m. Environmental changes drove fish aggregation, and our results indicated that Chla was negatively correlated with fish communities, while DO was positively correlated with fish communities. This study released the fish diversity pattern and the effects of the environment in the CCZ, which would provide useful information for biodiversity management and an environmental baseline for the International Seabed Authority. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Ecology and Fisheries Management)
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