Special Issue "Comparative Oncology: Integrating Naturally Occurring Cancers of Dogs into Investigations of Cancer Biology and Therapy"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
A/Prof. Dr. Chiara Palmieri

Faculty of Science,School of Veterinary Science,University of Queensland,Gatton campus, Gatton 4343,Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: comparative oncology; dog; prostate cancer; osteosarcoma
Co-Guest Editor
A/Prof. Dr. Rachel Allavena

Faculty of Science,School of Veterinary Science,University of Queensland,Gatton campus, Gatton 4343,Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: comparative oncology; translational medicine; animal models

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Comparative Oncology has attracted considerable attention from the scientific community as a multidisciplinary approach for a better understanding, diagnosis and therapy of cancer in both humans and animals.

Cancer in dogs share may features with human cancer, including genetics, biological behaviour, histological features, molecular pathways and response to therapies. Osteosarcoma, lymphoma, haemangiosarcoma, prostate carcinoma, mammary carcinoma, soft tissue sarcoma, melanoma are just few examples of canine cancers offering a unique opportunity as models for translational therapeutics.  

Despite increasingly productive outcomes in the identification of cancer-associated genes, the study of tumour progression and the evaluation of novel cancer strategies, the complete biology and molecular pathology of many canine cancers still need to be revealed.

Further, as our understanding of cancer biology in dog models grows, promotion of the value of canine companions as research models needs to be continued. Communication of the value of dogs in research to the general public, veterinary practitioners and research scientists will improve trial recruitment, research and treatment outcomes for both human and canine patients.

This Special Issue on “Comparative Oncology: Integrating Naturally Occurring Cancers of Dogs into Investigations of Cancer Biology and Therapy” includes reviews and research articles on different and latest aspects of comparative oncology, from cancer pathogenesis to new treatment options.

We believe that the information provided in this issue will fill knowledge gaps and further stimulate research collaborations between scientists across different disciplines for advances in cancer prevention and cute in both medical and veterinary oncology.

A/Prof. Dr. Chiara Palmieri
A/Prof. Dr. Rachel Allavena
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • comparative oncology
  • dog
  • cancer
  • animal model
  • translational medicine
  • cancer biology
  • cancer therapy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview Lower Urinary Tract Neoplasia
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(4), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5040096
Received: 19 September 2018 / Revised: 16 November 2018 / Accepted: 19 November 2018 / Published: 27 November 2018
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Abstract
Lower urinary tract neoplasia in companion animals is a debilitating and often life-threatening disease. Tumors of the bladder, urethra, and prostate often occur independently, although extension of these tumors into adjacent regions of the lower urinary tract is documented frequently. The most common
[...] Read more.
Lower urinary tract neoplasia in companion animals is a debilitating and often life-threatening disease. Tumors of the bladder, urethra, and prostate often occur independently, although extension of these tumors into adjacent regions of the lower urinary tract is documented frequently. The most common lower urinary tract tumor in dogs and cats is transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). In both dogs and cats, TCC affecting the urinary bladder is generally considered to be highly aggressive with both local and metastatic disease potential, and this disease poses unique treatment challenges. Whereas much literature exists regarding the TCC disease process, treatment options, and prognosis in dogs, relatively few studies on feline TCC have been published due to the lower incidence of TCC in this species. Prostate tumors, most commonly adenocarcinomas, occur less commonly in dogs and cats but serve an important role as a comparative model for prostate neoplasia in humans. This article serves as a review of the current information regarding canine and feline lower urinary tract neoplasia as well as the relevance of these diseases with respect to their human counterparts. Full article
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