Antibody Response Studies on SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2022) | Viewed by 4107

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail
Guest Editor
1. Department of Nephrology and Transplantation, Strasbourg University Hospital, 67200 Strasbourg, France
2. INSERM UMR-S 1109 LabEx TRANSPLANTEX, Strasbourg University, 67000 Strasbourg, France
Interests: SARS-CoV-2; BK virus; kidney; transplantation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic many anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccine platforms have been developed and used. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccines have significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with this viral infection. Unfortunately, a short-term decline in antibody titer and the emergence of new variants of concern appear to reduce vaccine efficacy and have re-exposed the vaccinated population to COVID-19. Additionally, the vaccine response remains weak in the immunocompromised population, who are very exposed to severe forms of COVID-19. Today, there are many data regarding anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in the literature, but many questions remain among them:

  • What are the long-term kinetics of antibody titer?
  • What is the best vaccination schedule to optimize the immune response?
  • Can we define a neutralizing antibody threshold or a protective antibody titer to guide vaccine strategy?
  • What strategies should be adopted in immunocompromised patients in order to improve the vaccine response?
  • What is the effectiveness of new vaccines, such as recombinant protein vaccines or intranasal vaccines?
  • What are the short- and long-term vaccine antibody responses in children?

Furthermore, as the pandemic evolves other questions will arise. For this Special Issue we invite submissions in the form of original research articles, reviews or brief reports that address these issues and more generally the humoral response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.

Dr. Ilies Benotmane
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antibody response
  • humoral response
  • neutralizing antibody
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • COVID-19 vaccine
  • immune response

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

17 pages, 1090 KiB  
Article
The Antibody Response to the BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 Booster in Healthcare Workers: Association between the IgG Antibody Titers and Anthropometric and Body Composition Parameters
by Marlena Golec, Adam Konka, Martyna Fronczek, Joanna Zembala-John, Martyna Chrapiec, Karolina Wystyrk, Sławomir Kasperczyk, Zenon Brzoza and Rafał Jakub Bułdak
Vaccines 2022, 10(10), 1638; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10101638 - 29 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1519
Abstract
Background: Research shows that in most people, two-dose vaccination helps to shape the humoral response to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Further studies are required to learn about the vaccine’s effectiveness after boosting. Methods: We conducted a prospective study among 103 [...] Read more.
Background: Research shows that in most people, two-dose vaccination helps to shape the humoral response to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Further studies are required to learn about the vaccine’s effectiveness after boosting. Methods: We conducted a prospective study among 103 healthcare workers (HCWs) from a regional multi-specialty hospital vaccinated with three doses of the BNT162b2 vaccine. We compared their immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers 14 days after the second dose with those 21 days after the booster. We also compared their anthropometric and body composition parameters with IgG concentrations at the same time points. Results: Twenty-one days after the booster, all study participants were seropositive. Their mean IgG antibody titers were significantly lower than 14 days after the second dose (158.94 AU/mL ± 90.34 AU/mL vs. 505.79 AU/mL ± 367.16 AU/mL). Post-booster Spearman’s correlation analysis showed a significantly weak correlation between the IgG antibody titer and parameters related to muscle tissue and adipose tissue (including body fat mass). Conclusions: The BNT162b2 booster stimulates the humoral response to a lesser extent than the two-dose BNT162b2 primary vaccination. The adipose and muscle tissue parameters show a weak positive correlation with the SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody titers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibody Response Studies on SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1249 KiB  
Article
Durability of Humoral and Cellular Immunity after an Extended Primary Series with Heterologous Inactivated SARS-CoV-2 Prime-Boost and ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 in Dialysis Patients (ICON3)
by Sarinya Boongird, Chavachol Setthaudom, Rungthiwa Kitpermkiat, Somsak Prasongtanakij, Supanart Srisala, Piyatida Chuengsaman, Arkom Nongnuch, Montira Assanatham, Sasisopin Kiertiburanakul, Kumthorn Malathum, Angsana Phuphuakrat and Jackrapong Bruminhent
Vaccines 2022, 10(7), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10071064 - 01 Jul 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2148
Abstract
The durability of a three-dose extended primary series of COVID-19 vaccine in dialysis patients remains unknown. Here, we assessed dynamic changes in SARS-CoV-2-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months after the extended primary series in 29 hemodialyzed (HD), [...] Read more.
The durability of a three-dose extended primary series of COVID-19 vaccine in dialysis patients remains unknown. Here, we assessed dynamic changes in SARS-CoV-2-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months after the extended primary series in 29 hemodialyzed (HD), 28 peritoneal dialyzed (PD) patients, and 14 healthy controls. Participants received two doses of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine followed by a dose of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. At 6 months, median anti-RBD IgG titers (IQR) significantly declined from baseline in the HD (1741 (1136–3083) BAU/mL vs. 373 (188–607) BAU/mL) and PD (1093 (617–1911) BAU/mL vs. 180 (126–320) BAU/mL) groups, as did the mean percent inhibition of neutralizing antibodies (HD: 96% vs. 81%; PD: 95% vs. 73%) (all p < 0.01). Age and post-vaccination serological response intensity were predictors of early humoral seroprotection loss. In contrast, cell-mediated immunity remained unchanged. In conclusion, humoral immunity declined substantially in dialysis patients, while cell-mediated immunity remained stable 6 months after the extended heterologous primary series of two inactivated SARS-CoV-2/ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. A booster dose could be considered in dialysis patients 3 months after this unique regimen, particularly in the elderly or those with a modest initial humoral response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibody Response Studies on SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop