SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Impact in Antibody Response

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "COVID-19 Vaccines and Vaccination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 1180

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail
Guest Editor
1. Department of Nephrology and Transplantation, Strasbourg University Hospital, 67200 Strasbourg, France
2. INSERM UMR-S 1109 LabEx TRANSPLANTEX, Strasbourg University, 67000 Strasbourg, France
Interests: SARS-CoV-2; BK virus; kidney; transplantation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccine platforms have been developed and used. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccines have significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with this viral infection. Unfortunately, a short-term decline in antibody titer and the emergence of new variants of concern appear to reduce vaccine efficacy and have re-exposed the vaccinated population to COVID-19. Additionally, the vaccine response remains weak in the immunocompromised population, who are especially exposed to severe forms of COVID-19. Today, there are many data regarding anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations in the literature, but many questions remain among them: What is the impact of bivalent vaccines on antibody response? What is the best vaccination schedule to optimize the immune response? Can we define a neutralizing antibody threshold or a protective antibody titer to guide vaccine strategy? What strategies should be adopted in immunocompromised patients in order to improve the vaccine response? What is the effectiveness of new vaccines, such as recombinant protein vaccines or intranasal vaccines? What are the short- and long-term vaccine antibody responses in children? Furthermore, as the pandemic evolves, other questions will arise.

For this Special Issue, we invite submissions in the form of original research articles, reviews or brief reports that address these issues and more generally the humoral response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.

Dr. Ilies Benotmane
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antibody response
  • humoral response
  • neutralizing antibody
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • COVID-19
  • vaccine
  • immune response

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 1195 KiB  
Article
BNT162b2 Booster Dose Elicits a Robust Antibody Response in Subjects with Abdominal Obesity and Previous SARS-CoV-2 Infection
by Alexis Elias Malavazos, Carola Dubini, Valentina Milani, Sara Boveri, Chiara Meregalli, Caterina Bertolini, Carola Buscemi, Rosanna Cardani, Laura Valentina Renna, Manuel Bruno Trevisan, Valentina Scravaglieri, Maria Teresa Cuppone, Lorenzo Menicanti, Elena Costa, Federico Ambrogi, Chiara Ruocco, Michele Carruba, Gianluca Iacobellis, Enzo Nisoli and Massimiliano Marco Corsi Romanelli
Vaccines 2023, 11(12), 1796; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11121796 - 30 Nov 2023
Viewed by 941
Abstract
Little is known about the long-term durability of the induced immune response in subjects with obesity, particularly in those with an abdominal distribution of adipose tissue. We evaluated SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody responses after BNT162b2 vaccine booster dose, comparing individuals with and without abdominal obesity [...] Read more.
Little is known about the long-term durability of the induced immune response in subjects with obesity, particularly in those with an abdominal distribution of adipose tissue. We evaluated SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody responses after BNT162b2 vaccine booster dose, comparing individuals with and without abdominal obesity (AO), discerning between individuals previously infected or not. IgG-TrimericS were measured in 511 subjects at baseline, on the 21st day after vaccine dose 1, and at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months from dose 2, and at 1 and 3 months following the booster dose. To detect SARS-CoV-2 infection, nucleocapsid antibodies were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. Multivariable linear regression evaluated the three-month difference in the absolute variation in IgG-TrimericS levels from booster dose, showing AO and SARS-CoV-2 infection status interactions (p = 0.016). Regardless of possible confounding factors and IgG-TrimericS levels at the booster dose, AO is associated with a higher absolute change in IgG-TrimericS in prior infected individuals (p = 0.0125). In the same regression model, no interaction is highlighted using BMI (p = 0.418). The robust response in the development of antibodies after booster dose, observed in people with AO and previous infection, may support the recommendations to administer a booster dose in this population group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Impact in Antibody Response)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop