Immunotherapy: A New Frontier for Anti-tumor

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 7282

Special Issue Editors

Department of System Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
Interests: DNA damage; immunotherapy; pre-mRNA alternative splicing

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Guest Editor
Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA
Interests: immunotherapy; interaction of cancer and infection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Immunotherapies that harness or enhance a patient’s own immune system to target and kill cancer cells have been very successful for certain types of advanced cancers, such as lung, bladder, and skin cancer. The major therapeutic approaches are the use of antibodies against inhibitory signaling molecules expressed on tumor and immune cells. Although immune checkpoint blockade agents are very promising, only a small subset of patients respond to these agents, and there is increased evidence of primary and adaptive resistance to immune checkpoint blockade in multiple cancer types. Therefore, these is an urgent need to identify novel anti-tumor therapeutic approaches and understand mechanisms of anti-tumor immunotherapeutic. 

This Special Issue aims to gather the frontier of anti-tumor immunotherapy strategies to provide new avenues for developing next-generation immunotherapies. In this Special Issue, original research articles case reports, reviews and mini reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but not limited to) the following:

  • Novel approaches to cancer immunotherapy
  • Immunological assessment of tumor microenvironment
  • Mechanisms of novel anti-tumor immunotherapies
  • Cancer vaccines
  • Combination of immunotherapy with targeted therapy
  • Advanced tools to analyze and integrate immune repertoire data.

We look forward to receiving your contributions. 

Dr. Jing Zhang
Dr. Qinqin Pu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

21 pages, 1255 KiB  
Review
Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in HBV-Caused Hepatocellular Carcinoma Therapy
by Jin Zhang, Changwei Hu, Xiaoxiao Xie, Linzhi Qi, Chuanzhou Li and Shangze Li
Vaccines 2023, 11(3), 614; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11030614 - 8 Mar 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2998
Abstract
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the main risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer, with high incidence and mortality worldwide. Surgery, liver transplantation, and ablation therapies have been used to treat early HBV-caused [...] Read more.
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the main risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer, with high incidence and mortality worldwide. Surgery, liver transplantation, and ablation therapies have been used to treat early HBV-caused HCC (HBV-HCC); meanwhile, in the advanced stage, chemoradiotherapy and drug-targeted therapy are regularly considered, but with limited efficacy. Recently, immunotherapies, such as tumor vaccine therapy, adoptive cell transfer therapy, and immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have demonstrated promising efficacy in cancer treatment. In particular, immune checkpoint inhibitors can successfully prevent tumors from achieving immune escape and promote an anti-tumor response, thereby boosting the therapeutic effect in HBV-HCC. However, the advantages of immune checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of HBV-HCC remain to be exploited. Here, we describe the basic characteristics and development of HBV-HCC and introduce current treatment strategies for HBV-HCC. Of note, we review the principles of immune checkpoint molecules, such as programmed cell death protein 1(PD-1) and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) in HBV-HCC, as well as related inhibitors being considered in the clinic. We also discuss the benefits of immune checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of HBV-HCC and the efficacy of those inhibitors in HCC with various etiologies, aiming to provide insights into the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors for the treatment of HBV-HCC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immunotherapy: A New Frontier for Anti-tumor)
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13 pages, 709 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances in DNA Vaccines against Lung Cancer: A Mini Review
by Ting Huang, Li Liu, Zheng Lv, Kelei Zhao, Qiong Yi and Jing Zhang
Vaccines 2022, 10(10), 1586; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10101586 - 21 Sep 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3674
Abstract
Lung cancer is regarded as the major causes of patient death around the world. Although the novel tumor immunotherapy has made great progress in the past decades, such as utilizing immune checkpoint inhibitors or oncolytic viruses, the overall 5-year survival of patients with [...] Read more.
Lung cancer is regarded as the major causes of patient death around the world. Although the novel tumor immunotherapy has made great progress in the past decades, such as utilizing immune checkpoint inhibitors or oncolytic viruses, the overall 5-year survival of patients with lung cancers is still low. Thus, development of effective vaccines to treat lung cancer is urgently required. In this regard, DNA vaccines are now considered as a promising immunotherapy strategy to activate the host immune system against lung cancer. DNA vaccines are able to induce both effective humoral and cellular immune responses, and they possess several potential advantages such as greater stability, higher safety, and being easier to manufacture compared to conventional vaccination. In the present review, we provide a global overview of the mechanism of cancer DNA vaccines and summarize the innovative neoantigens, delivery platforms, and adjuvants in lung cancer that have been investigated or approved. Importantly, we highlight the recent advance of clinical studies in the field of lung cancer DNA vaccine, focusing on their safety and efficacy, which might accelerate the personalized design of DNA vaccine against lung cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immunotherapy: A New Frontier for Anti-tumor)
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