Nanofunctionalization of Textiles

A special issue of Textiles (ISSN 2673-7248).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 7194

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to submit your work to this special issue on “Nanofunctionalization of Textiles”. Recently, there has been a considerable research interest in nanotechnology using nanoparticles due to their unique physical properties that mainly include size-dependent optical, magnetic, electronic, and catalytic properties. At the forefront of material science, inorganic nanoparticles such as metals, semiconductors, and metal oxides have led to some very important theoretical and practical advances for a wide of variety of applications in the field of information, energy, environmental, and medical technologies. Moreover, the recent combination of the disciplines of nanotechnology and biology has led to some very important theoretical and practical advances in both biology and nanoengineered materials. The scope of this Special Issue on nanotechnology applied to textiles includes not only nanoparticle coatings, which usually encompass most of the research in this field, but also new advanced technologies such as electrospinning, wet spinning, plasma, and hybrid bionanomaterials with applications in all sectors, including biomedical, food, agriculture, energy, and environment. In particular, the topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Emerging microscale technologies for textiles;
  • Fiber-based biosensors;
  • Bionanotech fiber-based water treatment;
  • Tissue engineering and drug delivery;
  • Nanotextiles in medicine;
  • Bionanotechnological textile applications in plants and agriculture;
  • Smart medical materials and antimicrobial coatings;
  • Coatings for protection and comfort;
  • Biomimetic coatings;
  • Memory polymer coatings;
  • Self-cleaning processes;
  • Self-healing coatings;
  • Smart breathable coatings for textiles;
  • Conductive polymer coatings;
  • Photonic materials.

Dr. Andrea Zille
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Textiles is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • emerging microscale technologies for textiles
  • fiber-based biosensors
  • bionanotech fiber-based water treatment
  • tissue engineering and drug delivery
  • nanotextiles in medicine
  • bionanotechnological textile applications in plants and agriculture
  • smart medical materials and antimicrobial coatings
  • coatings for protection and comfort
  • biomimetic coatings
  • memory polymer coatings
  • self-cleaning processes
  • self-healing coatings
  • smart breathable coatings for textiles
  • conductive polymer coatings
  • photonic materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 2052 KiB  
Article
Testing the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Polyacrylonitrile Nanofibers Reinforced with Succinite and Silicon Dioxide Nanoparticles
by Inga Lasenko, Dace Grauda, Dalius Butkauskas, Jaymin Vrajlal Sanchaniya, Arta Viluma-Gudmona and Vitalijs Lusis
Textiles 2022, 2(1), 162-173; https://doi.org/10.3390/textiles2010009 - 8 Mar 2022
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 3454
Abstract
In this research, we focused on testing the physical and mechanical properties of the developed polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite nanofibers with succinite (Baltic amber) and SiO2 particles using standard methods of nanofiber testing (physical and mechanical properties). Polyacrylonitrile composite nanofibers (based on the [...] Read more.
In this research, we focused on testing the physical and mechanical properties of the developed polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite nanofibers with succinite (Baltic amber) and SiO2 particles using standard methods of nanofiber testing (physical and mechanical properties). Polyacrylonitrile composite nanofibers (based on the electrospinning method) were coated on an aluminum substrate for structural investigation. SEM was used to determine the average fiber diameter and standard deviation. The mechanical properties of the fibers were determined using a universal testing machine (NANO, MTS). We observed that constant or decreased levels of crystallinity in the ultrafine composite nanofibers led to the preservation of high levels of strain at failure and that the strength of nanofibers increased substantially as their diameter reduced. Improvements in PAN composite nanofibers with succinite and SiO2 nanopowder are feasible with continuous decreases in diameter. The drastically decreased strain at failure demonstrated a substantial reduction in viscosity (toughness) of the annealed nanofibers. Large stresses at failure in the as-spun nanofibers were a result of their low crystallinity. As a result, decreasing the diameter of PAN nanofibers from approximately 2 micrometers to 139 nanometers (the smallest nanofiber tested) resulted in instantaneous increases in the elastic modulus from 1 to 26 GPa, true strength from 100 to 1750 MPa, and toughness from 20 to 604 MPa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanofunctionalization of Textiles)
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Review

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17 pages, 1962 KiB  
Review
A Review of Recent Developments in Smart Textiles Based on Perovskite Materials
by Madeeha Tabassum, Qasim Zia, Yongfeng Zhou, Yufei Wang, Michael J. Reece and Lei Su
Textiles 2022, 2(3), 447-463; https://doi.org/10.3390/textiles2030025 - 16 Aug 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2821
Abstract
Metal halide perovskites (MHPs) are thought to be among the most promising materials for smart electronic textiles because of their unique optical and electrical characteristics. Recently, wearable perovskite devices have been developed that combine the excellent properties of perovskite with those of textiles, [...] Read more.
Metal halide perovskites (MHPs) are thought to be among the most promising materials for smart electronic textiles because of their unique optical and electrical characteristics. Recently, wearable perovskite devices have been developed that combine the excellent properties of perovskite with those of textiles, such as flexibility, light weight, and facile processability. In this review, advancements in wearable perovskite devices (e.g., solar cells, photodetectors, and light-emitting diodes) concerning their device architectures, working mechanisms, and fabrication techniques have been discussed. This study also highlights the technical benefits of integrating MHPs into wearable devices. Moreover, the application challenges faced by wearable perovskite optoelectronic devices—from single devices to roll-to-roll manufacturing, stability and storage, and biosafety—are briefly discussed. Finally, future perspectives on using perovskites for other wearable optoelectronic devices are stated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanofunctionalization of Textiles)
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