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Urban Planning for Sustainable Development of Cities in the Geospatial (Big) Data ERA

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2023) | Viewed by 32692

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy
Interests: urban planning; risk management; spatial decision support systems; spatial analysis; data analytics; GIS; geo crowdsourced data

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Guest Editor
Deptartment Computer Science, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy
Interests: GIS; data science; spatial decision support systems; spatial analysis

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy
Interests: urban planning; spatial planning; risk management

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Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Patrimonio, Architettura e Urbanistica, Università Mediterranea, 89124 Reggio Calabria RC, Italy
Interests: data science in the management of ecological and digital transition process technical change; urban and territorial complexity diffusion of innovation and societal challenges

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urbanization poses great challenges for humans as it determines enormous impacts, such as environmental pollution, noise pollution, heat island effects, habitat fragmentation, loss of ecosystem services, and pressures on urban security, protected heritage sites and, generally, on the landscape changes.

Although cities occupy only three percent of the world’s surface, indeed, they are responsible for three quarters of global resource consumption and 76% of greenhouse gas emissions (Creutzig, 2015).

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the UN Agenda 2030 sanction unequivocally the link between environmental changes and social inequalities, innovating deeply the real concept of sustainable development as defined in its first definition in 1987.

In this context, the following questions need to be answered: How is it possible to manage efficiently a city with a view to sustainable development? How can be citizens become involved in reflecting on their future? What can be the main requirements for organizing smart cities? (Laurini, 2020).

A new science based on big data, urban models and network theory is emerging, providing a different and new perspective for planners and decision makers so that they can deepen the knowledge of current and future cities (Betty, 2021).

As a consequence, the responsibilities of urban planning must be investigated with reference to the challenges launched by the SDGs, starting from Goal 11, “Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable”, and the awareness of the role that geospatial big data can play in the achievement of this goal. In fact, the growing accessibility of such data from direct and indirect sources (i.e., remote sensing, sensors/Internet of Things, geo crowdsourced data) produces a set of multilevel and multi-sectorial information available to the urban planner. This favours the integration of different disciplines in the study of urban phenomena but, nevertheless, generates uncertainty due to the data complexity and redundancy. Therefore, there is a need to extract knowledge intelligently from these geospatial big data in order to understand, predict and manage how cities and urban areas work, change and grow.

In order to understand how urban and regional planning can benefit from geospatial big data with the main aim to reach the SDGS objectives, this Special Issue is dedicated to the exploration of:

  • conceptual approaches and application experiences;
  • theoretical and methodological development;
  • techniques (i.e. machine-learning, data analytics, data visualization and data models for the representation of geospatial big data, Data-informed design and planning, urban modelling, E-participation;);
  • integrated application of BIM and GIS;
  • geographic knowledge bases;
  • scientifically grounded indicators.

References:

  1. Batty M. Planning the 21st Century City – Four Snapshots for a New Science, International Review for Spatial Planning and Sustainable Development. 2021, 9, 1–9. doi:10.14246/irspsd.9.1_1.
  2. Batty, M.; Marshall, S. Thinking Organic, Acting Civic: The Paradox of Planning for Cities in Evolution. Urban Plan 2017, 166, 4–14. doi:10.1016/j.landurbplan.2016.06.002.
  3. Creutzig, F.; Baiocchi, G.; Bierkandt, R.; Pichler, P.P.; Seto, K.C. A global typology of urban energy use and potentials for an urbanization mitigation wedge. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2015, 112, 6283–6288.
  4. Kharrazi, A.; Qin, H.; Zhang, Y. Urban Big Data and Sustainable Development Goals: Challenges and Opportunities. Sustainability 2016, 8, 1293.
  5. Kitchin, R. The Real-Time City? Big Data and Smart Urbanism. GeoJournal 2014, 79, 1–14.
  6. Laurini, R.; Servigne, S.; Favetta, F. Sobre la inteligencia territorial y las bases del conocimiento geográfico. Cuadernos De Administración 2020, 33. doi:10.11144/Javeriana.cao33.atigk.
  7. Laurini, R. Geographicknowledge infrastructure: Applications for territorial intelligence and smart cities. Elsevier & ISTE: London, UK, 2017.
  8. Sassen, S. How the Powerless Can “Hack” Global Cities. The Architect’s Newspaper, August 10 2017. Available online: https://www.archpaper.com/2017/08/saskia-sassen-hack-global-cities/.
  9. Shaw, M.; Howell, S. Governing Safer Cities: Strategies for a Globalised World. A Framework to Guide Urban Policy-Makers and Practitioners; United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime-UNODC, 2016. Available online: https://www.unodc.org/documents/justice-and-prison-reform/SaferCities.pdf (accessed 14 December 2020).
  10. Tong H, Kang J. Relationship between urban development patterns and noise complaints in England. Plan B Urban Anal. City Sci. 2020. doi:10.1177/2399808320930247.

Prof. Dr. Michele Grimaldi
Prof. Dr. Monica Sebillo
Prof. Dr. Isidoro Fasolino
Prof. Dr. Carmelina Bevilacqua
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban planning
  • spatial planning
  • Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
  • smart cities
  • spatial decision support systems
  • ICT
  • Open Data
  • Big Data
  • IoT
  • IoE
  • BIM
  • data analytics

Published Papers (13 papers)

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30 pages, 5276 KiB  
Article
Cities in Transition and Urban Innovation Ecosystems: Place and Innovation Dynamics in the Case of Boston and Cambridge (USA)
by Carmelina Bevilacqua, Pasquale Pizzimenti and Yapeng Ou
Sustainability 2023, 15(18), 13346; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151813346 - 6 Sep 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1712
Abstract
Urban transition is gaining relevance in the academic and policy debate for rethinking urban development strategies toward resilience and sustainability. The transformative power of innovation and knowledge is called upon to speed up the process. In this paper, we address the issue of [...] Read more.
Urban transition is gaining relevance in the academic and policy debate for rethinking urban development strategies toward resilience and sustainability. The transformative power of innovation and knowledge is called upon to speed up the process. In this paper, we address the issue of urban transition by exploring how the urban innovation ecosystem is a crucial factor in operationalizing city transition strategies. For this scope, we propose a methodological approach to identify the city-level innovation ecosystem by connecting innovation dynamics with urban transformation. The objective is to highlight how transition dynamics are spurred by the urban innovation ecosystem in its maturity stage. Therefore, the paper proposes a case study of the Boston area (the cities of Boston and Cambridge, USA) where it is possible to detect a mature urban innovation ecosystem. The case analysis unveiled the urban characterizing factors of the innovation ecosystem. Here, the concentration of innovation activities stimulates the demand for urban transformations, which are managed through urban planning and zoning and specific supportive policy-planning initiatives. Full article
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26 pages, 20211 KiB  
Article
An Integrated Approach to Sub-Surface Water Pathways for the Sustainable Development of the Architectural Landscape of Agro-Urban Areas
by Alessandra Como, Albina Cuomo and Luisa Smeragliuolo Perrotta
Sustainability 2023, 15(12), 9208; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15129208 - 7 Jun 2023
Viewed by 993
Abstract
This paper presents the results of multidisciplinary research which addresses the issue of sustainability within the design of urban agricultural landscapes through the joint solution of architecture and hydro-geomorphology for the management, accessibility and use of urban agricultural landscapes. If the traditional separation [...] Read more.
This paper presents the results of multidisciplinary research which addresses the issue of sustainability within the design of urban agricultural landscapes through the joint solution of architecture and hydro-geomorphology for the management, accessibility and use of urban agricultural landscapes. If the traditional separation between urban and productive land has now been overcome by the inclusion of agricultural areas within the cities, what is still under discussion is how to make its planning sustainable, especially in densely urbanized contexts. This research was developed with a methodology able to combine different types of data in order to satisfy needs relating to the availability of water for land supply and to make this landscape—both rural and urban—accessible to the city. Historical traces, interpretative insights, and hydro-geomorphological reading models of the territory were analysed. Their interweaving has made it possible to develop a prototype of a water and landscape infrastructure that combines a system for subsurface water, cycle–pedestrian paths and small-scale architecture features around the water tanks. The research has been tested in the city of Pozzuoli (NA) in Southern Italy, within the Monteruscello neighbourhood. The result led to a design solution of an integrated system which contributes to implementing the green transition within cities. Full article
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19 pages, 24354 KiB  
Article
Monitoring Urban Happiness through Interactive Chorems
by Pietro Battistoni, Marco Romano, Monica Sebillo and Giuliana Vitiello
Sustainability 2023, 15(11), 8733; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15118733 - 29 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1592
Abstract
The Sustainable Development Goals laid out in the UN 2030 Agenda, particularly Goal 11, which seeks to create inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable cities and human settlements, call on researchers, businesses, and public administrations to address the mounting challenges of urban planning and [...] Read more.
The Sustainable Development Goals laid out in the UN 2030 Agenda, particularly Goal 11, which seeks to create inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable cities and human settlements, call on researchers, businesses, and public administrations to address the mounting challenges of urban planning and to leverage them with a tool to enhance the well-being of citizens. This study demonstrates how chorematic maps can facilitate the comprehension of urban planning objectives and their relationship with the mental well-being of residents. To this end, a fresh set of chorems is proposed, which aims to depict the features and components of the urban environment that can affect happiness and, consequently, mental well-being. This research presents various examples of the application of the suggested chorems in an urban setting, which illustrates how they can be employed by experts and citizens alike and thereby can serve as a means to motivate administrators, technicians, and the public to engage with and live in their city with greater mindfulness and involvement. Full article
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22 pages, 2638 KiB  
Article
Mapping Connections between Neighborhoods in Response to Community-Based Social Needs
by Carmelina Bevilacqua, Poya Sohrabi, Nourhan Hamdy and Federica Mangiulli
Sustainability 2023, 15(6), 4898; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15064898 - 9 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1442
Abstract
Geographic proximity might not be the only factor influencing the connections between neighborhoods within the same city. Most likely, the community’s needs and behaviors play a role in facilitating or hindering any connections between these urban areas. Accordingly, relationships between communities may differ [...] Read more.
Geographic proximity might not be the only factor influencing the connections between neighborhoods within the same city. Most likely, the community’s needs and behaviors play a role in facilitating or hindering any connections between these urban areas. Accordingly, relationships between communities may differ or be similar based on their respective characteristics. This paper aims to demonstrate that communities are close based on the needs they share, regardless of their ethnicity or geographic location. In this study, a time series analysis of neighborhoods’ needs is explored to gain a deeper understanding of the communities’ network. The study takes into account the co-occurrence of complaints/reports from residents regarding the same issue. The dataset was retrieved from the Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI) and the 311 system that describe the features of neighborhoods regarding non-emergency issues. Subsequently, the connection between neighborhoods in the City of Boston was analyzed using a mixture of PCA, K-means, association rule mining, and a network creation tool. Moreover, clustering coefficients and degrees of centrality were used as significant factors in identifying the members of groups and marking crucial nodes in the network. A series of graphs were generated to show how the neighborhoods are linked based on their socioeconomic concerns. The results prove that even geographically disconnected neighborhoods within Boston have similar social needs, despite their distance from one another. Furthermore, it revealed that some neighborhoods can act as linking bridges for other neighborhoods, while others may be isolated within the network graph. This study has increased awareness of urban aspects. The authorities may consider other dimensions than the traditional ones regarding neighborhood development and addressing problems. Finally, it helps to identify common characteristics between neighborhoods, which facilitates the policy making process. Full article
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26 pages, 2963 KiB  
Article
Effects of Top-Down Balanced Development Strategies on Regional Balance: Evidence from Public Big Data in Korea
by Yejin Yoo and Seungbee Choi
Sustainability 2022, 14(23), 16221; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142316221 - 5 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1855
Abstract
The rapid economic growth of Korea was accompanied by the side effect of disproportionate growth between regions. The central government has implemented balanced development strategies by enacting the Special Act on Balanced National Development. For example, central administrative institutions were relocated to Sejong-si, [...] Read more.
The rapid economic growth of Korea was accompanied by the side effect of disproportionate growth between regions. The central government has implemented balanced development strategies by enacting the Special Act on Balanced National Development. For example, central administrative institutions were relocated to Sejong-si, which was built as the administrative capital. This study examines whether the top-down strategy promoted balanced growth between regions using public big data. We use various indicators to pay attention to not only quantitative growth, such as population size and economic growth, but also qualitative growth, such as life satisfaction. The results show that, despite the government’s efforts, the population was concentrated in the major metropolitan areas and the economic gap between regions did not narrow. While metropolitan areas achieved steady growth based on the preemption of spatial competitiveness, non-metropolitan areas did not take advantage of more investment from government. However, it shows a significant increase in job creation in Sejong-si, suggesting it is more efficient to move institutions in groups than to completely disperse public institutions in the balanced development strategy. In terms of the quality of life, Sejong-si had the lowest personal life satisfaction and local life satisfaction, indicating that the top-down strategy has failed to manage the quality of life. We propose that promoting a compact city with multiple functions in the non-metropolitan areas will help balance development. To achieve a better quality of life, centralized power should be transferred to local governments, and policies should be built based on communication with local residents. Innovative and sustainable policies that efficiently utilize the uniqueness and potential of the region are needed for balanced growth. Full article
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20 pages, 2120 KiB  
Article
Territorializing and Monitoring of Sustainable Development Goals in Italy: An Overview
by Anna Richiedei and Michele Pezzagno
Sustainability 2022, 14(5), 3056; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14053056 - 5 Mar 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3151
Abstract
The 2030 Agenda defined 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) divided into 169 targets, applicable everywhere and based on the “No one left behind” principle. Goals and indicators to measure the achievement of the 2030 Agenda have to be localized. The paper presents the [...] Read more.
The 2030 Agenda defined 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) divided into 169 targets, applicable everywhere and based on the “No one left behind” principle. Goals and indicators to measure the achievement of the 2030 Agenda have to be localized. The paper presents the Italian current evolution of the territorialization of the SDGs, starting from the global level up to the local one, and wonders if the implementation of the 2030 Agenda takes concrete form with the quantitative monitoring of the SDGs at the local level (municipalities and not only capitals). A comparison among indicators proposed at different levels is set by using an ad hoc comparative reading grid. The analysis highlights that, in Italy, the principle barriers in the territorialization of the SDGs are the lack of data open sources, the proposal of new not adequately validated metrics by institutional/non-institutional subjects and the progressive loss of relationship with Global indicator framework and targets of the 2030 Agenda. The strategies needed to reach sustainable development are obviously site-specific, but we need to maintain common metrics in measuring performances in relation to the 2030 Agenda. In the Global indicator framework for the Sustainable Development Goals and targets of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, it is possible to find indicators suitable to measure performances at the local level—albeit in a smaller numbers—but in Italy, there is no awareness about this. Italy is completely losing both the opportunity to compare the results of the effort performed by the Municipalities in a rigorous way and the possibility to use strong metrics to support decision-makers’ policies for the future. Full article
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19 pages, 4069 KiB  
Article
Spatializing Social Networking Analysis to Capture Local Innovation Flows towards Inclusive Transition
by Carmelina Bevilacqua, Poya Sohrabi and Nourhan Hamdy
Sustainability 2022, 14(5), 3000; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14053000 - 4 Mar 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2207
Abstract
The location of the local network of firms impacts, positively or negatively, their economic performance. The interactions between different sectors in a territory are still not easily observable. We test the complexity of the economic structure at a local level, given the availability [...] Read more.
The location of the local network of firms impacts, positively or negatively, their economic performance. The interactions between different sectors in a territory are still not easily observable. We test the complexity of the economic structure at a local level, given the availability of data at a very granular scale. This could greatly assist in observing sectors or/and locations that play a dominant role in the regional economy. Thus, in order to interpret the economic structure of a territory, we used cluster-based analysis. The analysis helps in evaluating the interconnections among sectors that constitute a cluster. A novel method of describing the territorial economic structure is presented by applying Social Network Analysis (SNA) within cluster-based analysis to characterize the importance of both location and economic interconnections. In this study, we focus on the industrial agglomerations in Calabria, Italy, to underpin the potential of the region’s industries by using social networking analysis metrics. This research put forward new interpretations of SNA metrics that describe regional economic compositions. Our findings reveal that territorial social networks are a potential instrument for understanding interactions in regional systems and economic clusters and might help in highlighting local industrial potentials. We believe that this study’s results could be considered as the initial steps for a pioneer data-driven place-based structural analysis model. Full article
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21 pages, 8155 KiB  
Article
Measuring Cluster-Based Spatial Access to Shopping Stores under Real-Time Travel Time
by Jiahui Qin, Shijia Luo, Disheng Yi, Heping Jiang and Jing Zhang
Sustainability 2022, 14(4), 2310; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042310 - 17 Feb 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1787
Abstract
Shopping stores are an important part of retail facilities and indispensable public facilities in a city. They are not only concentrated in shopping malls, but also distributed independently throughout the city, and often agglomerated in space. This paper attempts to measure the rationality [...] Read more.
Shopping stores are an important part of retail facilities and indispensable public facilities in a city. They are not only concentrated in shopping malls, but also distributed independently throughout the city, and often agglomerated in space. This paper attempts to measure the rationality of the spatial layout of all shopping stores in the city. Residents will visit multiple shopping stores in one trip to meet their demands. Based on this characteristic, this paper studies shopping store clusters and proposes a cluster two-step floating catchment area (C-2SFCA) method to analyze the accessibility differences of shopping stores in urban areas. Using the case of Beijing within the Fifth Ring Road, this paper implements the C-2SFCA method in a study unit of traffic analysis zones (TAZ) considering three transport modes (car, public transport, walking) with the support of real-time travel time collected from an internet map. The results show that spatial accessibility differed greatly under different transport modes and also had an uneven distribution pattern. Among these three results, the spatial variation of public transport accessibility was the highest. The results can provide references for urban planners in facility configuration and decision-making. Full article
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16 pages, 2216 KiB  
Article
From Deinstitutionalization to Community-Based Urban Development: Investigating Accessibility of Urban Systems in Calabria through Network Analytics
by Carmelina Bevilacqua, Pasquale Pizzimenti, Nourhan Hamdy and Federica Mangiulli
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1348; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031348 - 25 Jan 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2390
Abstract
Community-based urban development is an inclusive approach for local service provision and management centered on the proactive partnerships between urban communities and local governments. Rooted in the deinstitutionalization of public services, the European Union and national policy effort is pushing towards the organization [...] Read more.
Community-based urban development is an inclusive approach for local service provision and management centered on the proactive partnerships between urban communities and local governments. Rooted in the deinstitutionalization of public services, the European Union and national policy effort is pushing towards the organization of community-based alternatives in response to the evolving needs of local communities. As the pandemic has shown, service accessibility has proven to be a key concern element that needs to be addressed to increase communities’ and cities’ resilience. In this direction, the paper aims to propose data-driven alternative approaches to assess urban systems’ accessibility and connectivity as an element of leveraging the resilience-oriented planning process and facilitating community-based development. The methodological approach focuses on the case of the Calabria region, where community-based alternatives for the provision of public services found difficulties to be operationalized through an integrated planning approach. The case study is explored by experimenting on the spatial connections of two purposefully selected clusters to assess the accessibility and connectivity of urban systems within the region through network analysis visualization tools: health and social-related services and transportation and logistics. The analytical approach outlines the accessibility level of urban systems in the region examined, proving its relevance in detecting social, economic, and environmental dynamics. This approach shows how using non-traditional data-driven perspectives can detect development dynamics—which affect local community’s needs—and their limitations in the organization of community-based development alternatives. Full article
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16 pages, 18545 KiB  
Article
Voluntary Local Review Framework to Monitor and Evaluate the Progress towards Achieving Sustainable Development Goals at a City Level: Buraidah City, KSA and SDG11 as A Case Study
by Taher Osman, Emad Kenawy, Karim I. Abdrabo, David Shaw, Aref Alshamndy, Mohamed Elsharif, Muhammad Salem, Mamdooh Alwetaishi, Reda M. Aly and Bahaa Elboshy
Sustainability 2021, 13(17), 9555; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13179555 - 25 Aug 2021
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4219
Abstract
Around the world, cities are on the front lines of sustainable development. They are responsible for more than 70% of global carbon emissions. Many of these cities are experiencing dangerous levels of pollution, underemployment, and health disparities. Since 2015, 193 countries have endorsed [...] Read more.
Around the world, cities are on the front lines of sustainable development. They are responsible for more than 70% of global carbon emissions. Many of these cities are experiencing dangerous levels of pollution, underemployment, and health disparities. Since 2015, 193 countries have endorsed the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), intended to help address a wide range of challenges affecting cities and ultimately secure the resources for their next generations. All states are expected to present the national progress towards the SDGs through a Voluntary National Review (VNR). Despite the importance of the cities within this framework, only a handful of them worldwide have actively begun to review and assess progress towards these SDGs on a city scale. This paper seeks to develop a Voluntary Local Review (VLR) framework to assess and evaluate the progress of cities towards contributing to the SDGs. This framework has been developed by localizing the international and national frameworks to measure the performance of cities as they advance towards achieving the SDGs. Such a framework can serve as a tool for benchmarking progress on different aspects of sustainable development and help urban planners and policymakers prioritize policies and actions to improve urban quality of life. This framework is applied to monitor and evaluate the progress of the city of Buraidah in Saudi Arabia, as it strives towards achieving the targets of SDG11 (“Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable”). Full article
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19 pages, 43609 KiB  
Article
Contribution of Earth Observation and Geospatial Information for Urban Planning of Historic Cities’ Centres: The Case Study of Nicosia, Cyprus
by Branka Cuca and Athos Agapiou
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7023; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137023 - 22 Jun 2021
Viewed by 2532
Abstract
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations state that cities and human settlements need to be more inclusive, safe and resilient. In Europe cities have experienced dramatic physical, social and economic changes during the last decades while historic centres of European [...] Read more.
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations state that cities and human settlements need to be more inclusive, safe and resilient. In Europe cities have experienced dramatic physical, social and economic changes during the last decades while historic centres of European cities, among the most important assets of the European cultural heritage, are living paradoxes. They are defined as “a collection of beauty, icon of well-being, model of sustainability, but abandoned”. This study investigates the changes in the urban landscape of Nicosia, a particular historical centre in the Mediterranean region (Cyprus). The city centre is characterised by exceptionally well-preserved Venetian fortifications. Due to political circumstances, the capital of Cyprus, Nicosia, is still divided and has been ruled by two different administrations for several decades. This study used optical multi-spectral satellite datasets processing, like the Landsat and the most recent Sentinel-2 products, to detect, identify and characterise significant morphological transformations within the walled city and around it. This paper’s central thesis promotes a more systematic use of earth observation products and derivatives in decision-making processes that regard planning, use and management of urban resources in Europe, especially in support of urban planning strategies of historic cities. Full article
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18 pages, 7157 KiB  
Article
Geo-Crowdsourced Sound Level Data in Support of the Community Facilities Planning. A Methodological Proposal
by Gabriella Graziuso, Simona Mancini, Antonella Bianca Francavilla, Michele Grimaldi and Claudio Guarnaccia
Sustainability 2021, 13(10), 5486; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105486 - 14 May 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2544
Abstract
To reduce environmental noise pollution and to safeguard people’s well-being, it is urgently necessary to move towards sustainable urban development and reconcile demographic and economic growth with the protection and restoration of the environment and the improvement of the quality of human lives. [...] Read more.
To reduce environmental noise pollution and to safeguard people’s well-being, it is urgently necessary to move towards sustainable urban development and reconcile demographic and economic growth with the protection and restoration of the environment and the improvement of the quality of human lives. This challenge should be a concern to policymakers, who must issue regulations and define the appropriate actions for noise monitoring and management, and citizens, who must be sensitive to the problem and act accordingly. Starting from an analysis of several crowdsourcing noise data collection tools, this paper focuses on the definition of a methodology for data analysis and mapping. The sound sensing system, indeed, enables mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, to become a low-cost data collection for monitoring environmental noise. For this study, the “NoiseCapture” application developed in France by CNRS and IFSTTAR has been utilized. The measurements acquired in 2018 and 2019 at the Fisciano Campus at the University of Salerno were integrated with the kernel density estimation. This is a spatial analysis technique that allows for the elaboration of sound level density maps, defined spatially and temporally. These maps, overlaid on a campus facilities map, can become tools to support the appropriate mitigation actions. Full article
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16 pages, 8318 KiB  
Systematic Review
Organizational Performance Management and the ‘Sustainability’ of the Performance Evaluation System: A View Guided by the Integrative Review Perspective
by Sandra Rolim Ensslin, Kassia Tonheiro Rodrigues, Luiz Junior Maemura Yoshiura, Jessica Carvalho da Silva and André Andrade Longaray
Sustainability 2022, 14(17), 11005; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141711005 - 2 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3127
Abstract
Objective: This paper aims to explore the scientific literature in order to show how the process of institutionalizing (incorporating) the ‘sustainability’ of the performance evaluation system (PES) contributes to organizational performance management (OPM). Methodology: An integrative review was carried out with the support [...] Read more.
Objective: This paper aims to explore the scientific literature in order to show how the process of institutionalizing (incorporating) the ‘sustainability’ of the performance evaluation system (PES) contributes to organizational performance management (OPM). Methodology: An integrative review was carried out with the support of the ProKnow-C intervention instrument to select 39 articles that formed part of the bibliographic portfolio (BP). The PB analysis was conducted through the evolution of the performance evaluation (PE) area; the elaboration of the concept of OPM, which guided this research; and the development of a ‘lens’ using the concept of the ‘sustainability’ of the PES, from which it was possible to identify its essential aspects and use them as a basis for exploration. With this, it was feasible to demonstrate the relationship of the ‘lens’ with the guiding concept that allowed the elaboration of a taxonomy. Findings: In terms of the results, the evolution of a mature theme in the literature (PE) from a new perspective and with an emphasis on the integration of elements related to management is presented, allowing for the identification that the management elements are incipient and little developed in the literature. The elaboration of a taxonomy made it possible to verify that ‘learning’ is the aspect of sustainability that most contributes to OPM, that the ‘holistic/integrated vision’ element encompasses all aspects that determine the sustainability of the PES, and that the ‘use of information’ is the common component and link between the sustainability of PES and OPM in promoting organizational learning, supporting communication and providing it with a foundation for decision-making. Originality: Gaps were identified in the literature that led to the elaboration of a future research agenda for questions related to the importance of culture in encouraging the continuous process of performance management, the relationship of organizational learning with the context and strategic alignment, and the contribution of the human factor and culture to the continuous improvement of organizational performance. Thus, this research offers a new guiding perspective for OPM. Full article
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