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Sustainable Flood Management under Global Changes - Integrating Scientific and Stakeholder Knowledge

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 August 2022) | Viewed by 8350

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department Civil Engineering, Polytechnic of Leiria, Leiria, Portugal
Interests: flood modeling; climate change adaptation; water resources management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Floods are the most common natural hazard in the world, leading to loss of life and extensive property damage (public or private). Many factors can increase both frequency and intensity of floods, driven by natural (weather-related) and human causes (e.g., urbanization). Moreover, global changes (both climate and land use) are increasing the risk of extreme weather events, which may enhance the severe effects on communities, the economy, and the environment. Thus, it is important to build awareness in communities and engage all citizens and stakeholders in the planning process, prepare response strategies based on scientific knowledge of possible impacts under distinct global change scenarios, and forecast the potential socio-economic and environmental impacts. Despite a large number of studies regarding floods, there are still knowledge gaps regarding flood forecasting and prevention. There is a need for interdisciplinary flood management at all phases: risk assessment, adaptation, and planning and implementation of measures.

This Special Issue will present recent advances in tools to assess floods and discuss governance models required to establish land use and climate change sustainable policies on floods. Manuscripts investigating the following topics are of interest for this Special Issue:

  • Monitoring hydrological data and flood impacts (field survey, climate, and land use);
  • Flood modeling: advances in hydrodynamic modeling techniques;
  • Flood risk assessment for past conditions and future climate and land-use change scenarios;
  • Research on vulnerability and resilience, including case studies of best practices implementation;
  • Assessment of the impact of structural and non-structural actions to mitigate floods, including grey infrastructures and/or nature-based solutions, how they perform, and advantages and/or disadvantages;
  • Novel advances on early warning systems;
  • Flood management integrated planning in a changing climate;
  • Tools and methods for supporting decision- and policy-making related to climate change adaptation and flood risk reduction;
  • Understanding the socio-political context and legal structures that determine the opportunities and limitations to provide water retention in private land;
  • Enhancing communication between all actors to improve flood management;
  • Scientist and citizens joined in pushing forward policies that deal with environmental, social, and economic issues related to floods (including compensation measures, flood insurance, implementation of solutions);
  • Governance aspects of flood management.

Prof. Dr. Sandra Mourato
Dr. Carla Ferreira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Global changes
  • Flood risk
  • Vulnerability
  • Adaptation
  • Resilience
  • Stakeholder
  • Governance and planning

Published Papers (2 papers)

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20 pages, 4500 KiB  
Article
Exploring Options for Flood Risk Management with Special Focus on Retention Reservoirs
by Nejc Bezak, Martina Kovačević, Gregor Johnen, Klaudija Lebar, Vesna Zupanc, Andrej Vidmar and Simon Rusjan
Sustainability 2021, 13(18), 10099; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810099 - 9 Sep 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2458
Abstract
Floods are among the most frequent and deadliest natural disasters, and the magnitude and frequency of floods is expected to increase. Therefore, the effects of different flood risk management options need to be evaluated. In this study, afforestation, permeable concrete implementation, and the [...] Read more.
Floods are among the most frequent and deadliest natural disasters, and the magnitude and frequency of floods is expected to increase. Therefore, the effects of different flood risk management options need to be evaluated. In this study, afforestation, permeable concrete implementation, and the use of dry and wet retention reservoirs were tested as possible options for urban flood risk reduction in a case study involving the Glinščica river catchment (Slovenia). Additionally, the effect of dry and wet reservoirs was investigated at a larger (catchment) scale. Results showed that in the case of afforestation and permeable concrete, large areas are required to achieve notable peak discharge reduction (from a catchment scale point of view). The costs related to the implementation of such measures could be relatively high, and may become even higher than the potential benefits related to the multifunctionality and multi-purpose opportunities of such measures. On the other hand, dry and wet retention reservoirs could provide more significant peak discharge reductions; if appropriate locations are available, such reservoirs could be implemented at acceptable costs for decision makers. However, the results of this study show that reservoir effects quickly reduce with scale. This means that while these measures can have significant local effects, they may have only a minor impact at larger scales. We found that this was also the case for the afforestation and permeable concrete. Full article
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22 pages, 3739 KiB  
Review
Flood Mitigation in Mediterranean Coastal Regions: Problems, Solutions, and Stakeholder Involvement
by Francesca Ciampa, Samaneh Seifollahi-Aghmiuni, Zahra Kalantari and Carla Sofia Santos Ferreira
Sustainability 2021, 13(18), 10474; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810474 - 21 Sep 2021
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 4855
Abstract
Flooding affects Mediterranean coastal areas, with negative impacts on regional populations and ecosystems. This paper reviews the causes and consequences of coastal flooding in European Mediterranean countries, common and advanced solutions implemented to mitigate flood risk, and the importance of stakeholder involvement in [...] Read more.
Flooding affects Mediterranean coastal areas, with negative impacts on regional populations and ecosystems. This paper reviews the causes and consequences of coastal flooding in European Mediterranean countries, common and advanced solutions implemented to mitigate flood risk, and the importance of stakeholder involvement in developing these solutions. Climate change, intensive urbanization, tourism, deforestation, wildfires, and erosion are the main causes of coastal flooding, leading to social and economic losses, degradation of ecosystems, and water and soil contamination due to saltwater intrusion. Various measures for mitigating urban coastal flooding have been implemented, including coastal barriers, infrastructural drainage systems, wetlands, and mobile dams. Development and implementation of such solutions should be performed in close collaboration with stakeholders, but their current engagement at the coordination and/or decision-making level does not allow full integration of local knowledge in flood mitigation projects. Various processes are used to engage stakeholders in coastal flood mitigation, but participatory approaches are required to integrate their perspectives into performance analysis of potential solutions. Such approaches would allow a balance to be reached between nature conservation, market forces, stakeholder needs, and decision-makers’ priorities, resulting in development of innovative and sustainable mitigation solutions to enhance urban resilience to coastal flooding. Full article
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