Special Issue "Geochemistry of Landscape and Soil"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Water".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Nikolay Kasimov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Landscape Geochemistry and Soil Geography, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation
Interests: landscape geochemistry; geochemical barriers; heavy metals and metalloids; soil catena; elements partitioning; aquatic systems; road dust
Prof. Dr. Tatiana Minkina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Head of Department of Soil Science, Academy of Biology and Biotechnology, Southern Federal University, Stachki Ave. 194/1, 344090 Rostov-on-Don, Russia
Interests: soil science; biogeochemistry of trace elements; environmental soil chemistry; soil monitoring; assessment; modeling and remediation using physicochemical treatment methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Ivan Semenkov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Landscape Geochemistry and Soil Geography, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation
Interests: landscape geochemistry; partition; transport impacts on the environment
Dr. Carla Sofia Santos Ferreira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Center for Natural Resources, Environment and Society (CERNAS), Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: land degradation; soil and water quality; surface hydrology; nature based solutions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change and environmental pollution affect the equilibrium that has developed over a long period of time in the biosphere. Landscapes are an interface layer between the atmosphere, the lithosphere, the hydrosphere, the biosphere, and humans. Soils as a reflection of the landscape are at the forefront of these interactions, as they play an integral and decisive role in the provision of numerous ecosystem services. The unceasing development of advanced analytical techniques continues to change how questions on soil geochemistry and structure can be addressed, from nano- and micro-scales to the landscape and catchment scale.

This Special Issue of Water, entitled “Geochemistry of Landscape and Soil”, welcomes papers that describe field, experimental, and modeling studies related to the natural and human-caused balance of substances in the system “rocks–soils–aerosols–surface waters–bottom sediments–biota–people" and the adaptation of soils and landscapes to changing environments.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • an interdisciplinary understanding of how soils and landscapes function as media that provide for the migration and accumulation of substances;
  • adaptation of the migration and accumulation of substances to changing environments in landscapes and soils;
  • processes and mechanisms by which soils react to, and interact with, changes imposed by the wider environment or by direct human intervention (e.g., climate change, land-use, or management practice);
  • human health in connection with soils and landscapes: hidden hunger, endemic diseases, environmental pollution, etc.;
  • novel approaches, techniques, and methods for obtaining a new understanding of geochemical Earth-surface processes, especially in landscape catenas and river basins;
  • geochemical partition of heavy metals and metalloids in landscapes and soils; and
  • geochemical mitigation of soil and landscape degradation and enhancements in the supply of ecosystem services.

Prof. Dr. Nikolay Kasimov
Prof. Dr. Tatiana Minkina
Dr. Ivan Semenkov
Dr. Carla Sofia Santos Ferreira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental geochemistry
  • soil pollution
  • catena
  • potentially toxic elements
  • hidden hunger
  • endemic diseases
  • earth-surface processes
  • partition
  • landscape degradation
  • ecosystem services

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Optical, Geochemical and Mineralogical Characteristics of Light-Absorbing Impurities Deposited on Djankuat Glacier in the Caucasus Mountains
Water 2021, 13(21), 2993; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13212993 - 22 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Supra-glacial material, including light-absorbing impurities (LAI) such as mineral dust of crustal and soil origin, black carbon, algae and cryoconite, reduce the reflectance of snow and glacier ice. The reduction depends on the amount of LAI and their physical and chemical properties, which [...] Read more.
Supra-glacial material, including light-absorbing impurities (LAI) such as mineral dust of crustal and soil origin, black carbon, algae and cryoconite, reduce the reflectance of snow and glacier ice. The reduction depends on the amount of LAI and their physical and chemical properties, which vary spatially and temporally. Spectral reflectance data and snow and ice samples, containing LAI, were collected in the ablation zone of the Djankuat Glacier, Central Caucasus, Russia. The spectra of the samples containing mineral dust transported from deserts were characterized by negative visible near-infrared gradients and were different from the spectra of clean aged snow and exposed glacier ice and from the samples containing mineral dust produced locally. Geochemical and mineralogical analysis using X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry showed that samples containing desert dust were characterised by a high proportion of clay materials and such minerals as smectites, illite–smectites and palygorskite and by a smaller size of mineral particles. They were enriched in chromium, zinc and vanadium. The latter served as an indicator of dust transport over or origin from the oil-producing regions of the Middle East. There was a strong negative correlation between the amount of organic matter and mineral dust in the collected samples and the albedo of surfaces from which the samples were collected. The results suggested that organic matter reduced albedo more efficiently than mineral dust. The study highlighted the importance of supra-glacial material in changing the surface reflectivity of snow and glaciers in the Caucasus region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geochemistry of Landscape and Soil)
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Article
Migration of 238U and 226Ra Radionuclides in Technogenic Permafrost Taiga Landscapes of Southern Yakutia, Russia
Water 2021, 13(7), 966; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13070966 - 31 Mar 2021
Viewed by 568
Abstract
This article describes the features and migration patterns of natural long-lived heavy radionuclides 238U and 226Ra in the major components of the environment including rocks, river waters, soils, and vegetation of permafrost taiga landscapes of Southern Yakutia, which helped us to [...] Read more.
This article describes the features and migration patterns of natural long-lived heavy radionuclides 238U and 226Ra in the major components of the environment including rocks, river waters, soils, and vegetation of permafrost taiga landscapes of Southern Yakutia, which helped us to understand the scale and levels of their radioactive contamination. Different methods have been used in this study to determine the content of 238U and 226Ra in various samples, including gamma-ray spectrometry, X-ray spectroscopy, laser excited luminescence, and emanation method. It was determined that the main source of radioactive pollution of soil and vegetation cover, as well as surface waters in these technogenic landscapes, are the dumps of radioactive rock that were formed here as the result of geological exploration carried out in this area during the last third of the 20th century. The rocks studied were initially characterized by a coarse, mainly stony gravelly composition and contrasting radiation parameters, where the gamma radiation exposure rate varied between 1.71 and 16.7 µSv/h, and the contents of 238U and 226Ra were within the range 126–1620 mg/kg and 428–5508 × 10−7 mg/kg, respectively, and the 226Ra: 238U ratio was 1.0. This ratio shifted later on from the equilibrium state towards the excess of either 238U or 226Ra, due to the processes of air, water, and biogenic migration. Two types of 238U and 226Ra radionuclides migration were observed in studied soils, namely aerotechnogenic and hydrotechnogenic, each of which results in a different intraprofile radionuclide distribution and different levels of radioactive contamination. In this study, we also identified plants capable of selective accumulation of certain radionuclides, including Siberian mountain ash (Sorbus sibiricus), which selectively absorbs 226Ra, and terrestrial green and aquatic mosses, which accumulate significant amounts of 238U. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geochemistry of Landscape and Soil)
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Article
The Morphological and Functional Organization of Cattails Typha laxmannii Lepech. and Typha australis Schum. and Thonn. under Soil Pollution by Potentially Toxic Elements
Water 2021, 13(2), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13020227 - 18 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 941
Abstract
The aim of this study is to investigate the adaptation of two species of cattail Typha australis Schum. and Thonn. and Typha laxmannii Lepech. based on analysis of the morphological and anatomical features of their vegetative and generative organs to soil pollution with [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to investigate the adaptation of two species of cattail Typha australis Schum. and Thonn. and Typha laxmannii Lepech. based on analysis of the morphological and anatomical features of their vegetative and generative organs to soil pollution with potentially toxic elements (PTE) in the riparian zones of the sea edge of the Don River delta (Southern Russia). Both species of the cattail are able to accumulate high concentrations of Ni, Zn, Cd, Pb and can be used for phytoremediation of polluted territories. The pattern of PTE accumulation in hydrophytes has changed on polluted soils of coastal areas from roots/rhizomes > inflorescences > stems to roots/rhizomes > stems ≥ inflorescences. The comparative morphological and anatomical analysis showed a statistically significant effect of the environmental stress factor by the type of proliferation in T. australis, and species T. laxmannii was visually in a depressed, deformed state with mass manifestations of hypogenesis. These deformations should be considered, on one hand, as adaptive, but on the other, as pathological changes in the structure of the spikes of the cattails. Light-optical and electron microscopic studies have shown that the degree and nature of ultrastructural changes in cattails at the same level of soil pollution are different and most expressed in the assimilation tissue of leaves. However, these changes were destructive for T. australis, but for T. laxmannii, these indicated a high level of adaptation to the prolonged technogenic impact of PTE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geochemistry of Landscape and Soil)
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Article
Investigation into Freezing Point Depression in Soil Caused by NaCl Solution
Water 2020, 12(8), 2232; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082232 - 08 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2329
Abstract
Engineering practices illustrate that the water phase change in soil causes severe damage to roads, canals, airport runways and other buildings. The freezing point is an important indicator to judge whether the soil is frozen or not. Up to now, the influence of [...] Read more.
Engineering practices illustrate that the water phase change in soil causes severe damage to roads, canals, airport runways and other buildings. The freezing point is an important indicator to judge whether the soil is frozen or not. Up to now, the influence of salt on the freezing point is still not well described. To resolve this problem, a series of freezing point tests for saline soil were conducted in the laboratory. Based on the relationship between the freezing point and the water activity, a thermodynamic model considering the excess Gibbs energy was proposed for predicting the freezing point of saline soil by inducing the UNIQUAC (universal quasi-chemical) model. The experimental results show that the initial water content has little influence on the freezing point if the initial water content is higher than the critical water content, while the freezing point decreases with the decrease of the water content if the initial water content is lower than the critical water content. Moreover, it is found that the freezing point is related to the energy status of liquid water in saline soils and it decreases with the increase of the salt concentration. Moreover, the freezing point depression of saline soil is mainly caused by the decrease of water activity. Compared with the other two terms, the residual term, accounting for the molecular interactions, has an obvious influence on the water activity. This result is helpful for understanding how salt concentration affects the freezing point of saline soil and provides a reference for engineering construction in saline soil areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geochemistry of Landscape and Soil)
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