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Emerging Research in Sustainable Environmental Management: From the View of Human Ecology

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 19496

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Development Economics, VUN University of Economics and Business, 1000 Hanoi, Vietnam
Interests: geography; human ecology; environmental management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
University of Science, Vietnam National University, 1000 Hanoi, Vietnam
Interests: human ecology; environmental management; sustainability assessment; climate change; eco-tourism

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Guest Editor
Department of Industrial and Systems, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Interests: engineering operations research for energy, environment, and sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the past half-century, environmental management expanded into a specific research field supported by its own instruments, i.e., books, journals, conferences, and practices. At their origin, instruments for environmental management were strong in their analytical and descriptive aspects, but less so in their integrating components, providing added value by the analytical approach. Considering the interdisciplinary character of this research area, this lack of focus on integrating components led to some of the weaknesses of the field today.

During the same period, the thematic aspects of the area grew. Impactful was the contribution of the concepts, models, and instruments to the wide scope of sustainable development, its themes, its target groups, and its areas of application.

The wider its scope, the more evident the limitations of environmental management became. The area still lacks sufficient replies to the uncertainties linked with its instruments and looks for good practice examples in new domains of application, e.g., sustainable tourism, marginal ecosystems, and green economy. Human ecology, targeting interdisciplinarity and integration, might be the most suitable approach for addressing the current weaknesses in environmental management.

The journal Sustainability offers an opportunity to deal with these contemporary issues at the edge of our research field. For this Special Issue, we welcome the submission of papers on methods, theory, and applications of environmental management at the frontiers of our research field. We anticipate that the works collected will point to innovation and new avenues for the years to come.

Dr. Luc Hens
Dr. An Thinh Nguyen
Dr. Pham Thi Thu Ha
Dr. Jingzheng Ren
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental management
  • theory
  • methods
  • case studies
  • innovation
  • human ecology

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

26 pages, 12240 KiB  
Article
Application of Radar-Based Precipitation Data Improves the Effectiveness of Urban Inundation Forecasting
by Doan Quang Tri, Nguyen Vinh Thu, Bui Thi Khanh Hoa, Hoang Anh Nguyen-Thi, Vo Van Hoa, Le Thi Hue, Dao Tien Dat and Ha T. T. Pham
Sustainability 2024, 16(9), 3736; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16093736 - 29 Apr 2024
Viewed by 454
Abstract
Using radar to estimate and forecast precipitation as input for hydrological models has become increasingly popular in recent years because of its superior spatial and temporal simulation compared with using rain gauge data. This study used radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) to select [...] Read more.
Using radar to estimate and forecast precipitation as input for hydrological models has become increasingly popular in recent years because of its superior spatial and temporal simulation compared with using rain gauge data. This study used radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) to select the optimal parameter set for the MIKE URBAN hydrological model and radar-based quantitative precipitation forecasting (QPF) to simulate inundation in Nam Dinh city, Vietnam. The results show the following: (1) radar has the potential to improve the modeling and provide the data needed for real-time smart control if proper bias adjustment is obtained and the risk of underestimated flows after heavy rain is minimized, and (2) the MIKE URBAN model used to calculate two simulation scenarios with rain gauge data and QPE data showed effectiveness in combining the application of radar-based precipitation for the forecasting and warning of urban floods in Nam Dinh city. The results in Scenario 2 with rainfall forecast data from radar provide better simulation results. The average relative error in Scenario 2 is 9%, while the average relative error in Scenario 1 is 15%. Using the grid radar-based precipitation forecasting as input data for the MIKE URBAN model significantly reduces the error between the observed water depth and the simulated results compared with the case using an input rain gauge measured at Nam Dinh station (the difference in inundation level of Scenario 2 using radar-based precipitation is 0.005 m, and it is 0.03 m in Scenario 1). The results obtained using the QPE and QPF radar as input for the MIKE URBAN model will be the basis for establishing an operational forecasting system for the Northern Delta and Midland Regional Hydro-Meteorological Center, Viet Nam Meteorological and Hydrological Administration. Full article
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24 pages, 12568 KiB  
Article
Applying an Analytic Hierarchy Process and a Geographic Information System for Assessment of Land Subsidence Risk Due to Drought: A Case Study in Ca Mau Peninsula, Vietnam
by Doan Quang Tri, Nguyen Van Nhat, Quach Thi Thanh Tuyet, Ha T. T. Pham, Pham Tien Duc and Nguyen Thanh Thuy
Sustainability 2024, 16(7), 2920; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16072920 - 31 Mar 2024
Viewed by 740
Abstract
The increase in extreme weather events causes secondary hazards that can influence people and the environment enormously. The Ca Mau Peninsula is known as one of the areas most severely affected by drought, and excessive groundwater exploitation is one of the reasons leading [...] Read more.
The increase in extreme weather events causes secondary hazards that can influence people and the environment enormously. The Ca Mau Peninsula is known as one of the areas most severely affected by drought, and excessive groundwater exploitation is one of the reasons leading to a higher risk of land subsidence. This study uses the Delphi method and the KAMET rule table to analyze and select indicators that affect subsidence. The study uses the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) analytical hierarchy method to evaluate the weights of influencing factors, combined with geographic information system (GIS) technology to overlay the map layers of the main influencing factors and build a subsidence risk warning zoning map of the study area. The influencing factors selected to evaluate the impact on land subsidence in the study area during the drought period included geological structure, soil characteristics, groundwater flow exploitation, water flow in the dry season, current land use status, and evaporation in the dry season. The weights of these factors were evaluated based on the synthesis of relevant documents as well as consultation with experts. The results indicate that nearly two-thirds of the Ca Mau Peninsula area is currently at very low or low risk of subsidence. Meanwhile, 23% of the area is at medium risk, nearly 9% is at high risk, and 0.1% of the study area is at very high risk. Subsidence risk warning zoning maps can provide a visual and general overview of areas with high subsidence risk, supporting managers in making reference plans for socio-economic development in the Ca Mau Peninsula. Full article
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21 pages, 2566 KiB  
Article
Understanding the Importance of Eco-Labeling for Organic Foods at UNESCO Biosphere Reserves: A Case Study of the Cocoa Powder at the Dong Nai, Vietnam
by An Thinh Nguyen, Van Dinh Ha, Huy Kien Ngo, Ngoc Anh Le, Phuong Mai Khong, Ngoc Tram Thi Do, Minh Thuan Trinh, Tuan Dat Nguyen, Tran Quoc Khanh Ngo, Linh Chi Vu, My Luong Thi Do, Anh Tu Le, Binh Minh Tran and Van Thuong Nguyen
Sustainability 2023, 15(12), 9603; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15129603 - 15 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2948
Abstract
This study examined the willingness-to-pay (WTP) of consumers and the determinants of eco-labeling for the organic cocoa powder produced in the Dong Nai UNESCO Biosphere Reserve (DNBR), Southern Vietnam. Eco-labels are designed according to the tiers of eco-labeling for biosphere reserves (BR) introduced [...] Read more.
This study examined the willingness-to-pay (WTP) of consumers and the determinants of eco-labeling for the organic cocoa powder produced in the Dong Nai UNESCO Biosphere Reserve (DNBR), Southern Vietnam. Eco-labels are designed according to the tiers of eco-labeling for biosphere reserves (BR) introduced by UNESCO; they include BR Destination (Tier 1), BR Quality (Tier 2), and Professional Certification (Tier 3) labels. Questionnaires were delivered to 203 customers in the DNBR and nearby places, such as Dong Nai and HCMC. This study employed a hybrid approach using descriptive statistics, an ANOVA test, and a Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Model (PLS-SEM). The results indicate that gender and educational level have a positive effect on consumers’ preferences. Customers are willing to pay more for cocoa powder with an eco-label than one with an organic label. Perceived food safety and product knowledge lower customers’ WTP, whereas agricultural environment and pricing concerns increase it. Tier 2 is suggested for labeling cocoa powder in the DNBR. The DNBR Management Board, together with the federal and provincial governments, should all follow a similar certification process. Increased eco-label awareness is crucial for the future of environmentally responsible shopping and responsible business practices. Full article
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23 pages, 5989 KiB  
Article
Numerical Simulation of the Flood and Inundation Caused by Typhoon Noru Downstream from the Vu Gia-Thu Bon River Basin
by Tran Hong Thai, Doan Quang Tri, Nguyen Xuan Anh, Vo Van Hoa, Hiep Van Nguyen, Nguyen Van Nhat, Quach Thi Thanh Tuyet, Ha T. T. Pham, Pham Hoai Chung, Vu Van Thang and Tran Duy Thuc
Sustainability 2023, 15(10), 8203; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15108203 - 18 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1515
Abstract
Typhoon Noru (2022) was a historic storm that caused significant damage to the central region of Vietnam. Typhoon Noru has caused strong winds and torrential rainfall in Da Nang, Quang Nam, and Quang Ngai. Quang Nam Province saw many trees and power lines [...] Read more.
Typhoon Noru (2022) was a historic storm that caused significant damage to the central region of Vietnam. Typhoon Noru has caused strong winds and torrential rainfall in Da Nang, Quang Nam, and Quang Ngai. Quang Nam Province saw many trees and power lines fall, and many areas were flooded. The Da Nang government has reported the typhoon toppled many trees, blew the rooftops of three houses, damaged the walls of several schools, and caused a power outage at some 3200 substations. It resulted in widespread flooding in coastal areas and downstream from the Vu Gia-Thu Bon River river basin. This study evaluates the impact of Typhoon Noru. The results show that: (1) The numerical simulation was applied to re-analyze the offshore meteorological field with the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere–Wave–Sediment Transport (COAWST) model as an input for 2D wave propagation and hydraulic models; (2) The study couples the 1D and 2D models in MIKE FLOOD to simulate the flood and inundation caused by Typhoon Noru in the study area. The calibration and validation results of the 1D hydraulic model, the 2D wave propagation model, and the 2D hydrodynamic model were reasonably good, with a Nash coefficient ranging from 0.84 to 0.96 and a percent bias (BIAS) of −0.9% to 7.5%. The results of the simulation showed that the flood and inundation caused by Typhoon Noru resulted in significant damage in two districts: Thang Binh in Quang Nam province and Hoa Vang in Da Nang province. The practical significance of these results is that they provide valuable support for warning systems and troubleshooting efforts related to the impact of typhoons. Full article
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17 pages, 990 KiB  
Article
Improving Irrigation Water Use Efficiency of Robusta Coffee (Coffea canephora) Production in Lam Dong Province, Vietnam
by Duyen Nhat Lam Tran, Tien Dinh Nguyen, Thuy Thu Pham, Roberto F. Rañola, Jr. and Thinh An Nguyen
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6603; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126603 - 9 Jun 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4454
Abstract
Recent prolonged dry periods and lack of irrigation water have severely affected the productivity of coffee farms in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. This paper analyzes the efficiency of irrigation water use for Robusta coffee (Coffea canephora) in the Lam Dong [...] Read more.
Recent prolonged dry periods and lack of irrigation water have severely affected the productivity of coffee farms in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. This paper analyzes the efficiency of irrigation water use for Robusta coffee (Coffea canephora) in the Lam Dong province. A Cobb–Douglas production function was used to determine coffee productivity’s response to the application of irrigation water and other production factors using data collected from 194 farmers, while the technical efficiency (TE) and irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE) were analyzed using a data envelopment analysis (DEA) model. The correlation of different factors to IWUE was determined using the Tobit model. The production function analysis using Cobb–Douglas shows that the volume of irrigation water, amount of working capital, labor, and farm size significantly influence coffee productivity. Indigenous farmers are more efficient in utilizing irrigation water than migrant farmers. The Tobit result indicates that farmers’ experience, education level, the distance of farm to water sources, security of access to water sources, extension contact, and credit access significantly affect IWUE. The study findings further suggest that mitigating water shortages in coffee farms require subregional and national policy support such as better access to credit and extension services, training, land management, and household-level efforts to improve farming practices through the application of appropriate technologies and traditional knowledge. Full article
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26 pages, 2390 KiB  
Article
The Linkage Mechanism between Environment-Related Rules and Environment-Related Efficiency of Industries in China: An Analysis Based on the Adaptive Semi-Parametric Panel Model
by Di Wang
Sustainability 2021, 13(11), 6203; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13116203 - 31 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1569
Abstract
This study employed the adaptive semi-parameter model to determine the effects of environment-related rules (environment-related rules refer to laws and regulations in relation to environmental protection) on environment-related efficiency (environment-related efficiency refers to the environmental efficiency of a wide range of industries). In [...] Read more.
This study employed the adaptive semi-parameter model to determine the effects of environment-related rules (environment-related rules refer to laws and regulations in relation to environmental protection) on environment-related efficiency (environment-related efficiency refers to the environmental efficiency of a wide range of industries). In addition, the threshold regression model was employed to determine the industry threshold effect of environment-related rules on environment-related efficiency. The following conclusions were primarily drawn: (1) A U-shaped curve relationship was identified between the effect of environment-related rules and the environment-related efficiency of the broader national industry; (2) A threshold effect is exerted on environment-related efficiency, and under the effect exerted by environment-related rule below the lower limit of the optimal interval, environment-related rule policies cannot play a corresponding role, while the effect of environment-related rules is high. When the upper limit of the optimal interval is set, environment-related rules will exert extensively strong effects, which leads to the unsustainable development of the industry and distorts the industry’s development. The government is required to roll out different environment-related rule policies in accordance with the industry differences and the development stages of respective industries, fully exploit such environment-related rule policies for industries and technologies, optimize the environment-related rules system, and harmoniously advance industries, the economy, and the environment. Given the empirical results, it is critical to enhance the effect exerted by environment-related rules in the mining and manufacturing industries, elevate their technical level, and develop a positive relationship between the effect exerted by environment-related rules and environment-related efficiency enhancements. While China’s current environment-related rule policy imposes no discrimination between pollution-intensive industries and cleaner production industries, these industries should be treated differently in the days ahead. Full article
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15 pages, 1990 KiB  
Article
Impacts of Simulated Acid Rain on the Growth and the Yield of Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in the Mountains of Northern Vietnam
by Ha T. T. Pham, An Thinh Nguyen, Anh T. Ngoc. Do and Luc Hens
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 4980; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13094980 - 29 Apr 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 5787
Abstract
In the mountains of Northern Vietnam, frequent and intense acid rain affects the crops. This paper assesses the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) on the growth and the yield of soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in Hoa Binh province. A field [...] Read more.
In the mountains of Northern Vietnam, frequent and intense acid rain affects the crops. This paper assesses the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) on the growth and the yield of soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in Hoa Binh province. A field study in the summer–autumn seasons in 2017 (from May to August) in an area of 189 square meters was arranged according to a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with three repetitions including six treatments and a control. The experimental area was protected from ambient rain. Soybean plants were exposed three times a week to SAR at pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, and 6.0 (control). The results show that the growth parameters such as germination rate, stem length, and the number of main branches of the plants dramatically decreased in a dose–effect experiment. Gradual declines in the chlorophyll content (indirectly determined by SPAD) and the leaf area index (LAI) were observed as the acidity increased. The actual yield and yield components also tended to decrease when the pH of the rainwater fell, especially in the experimental plots treated at pH 3.0. The growth and yield of soybean were adversely affected when the plants were exposed to simulated acid rain, especially from a pH value of 3.5 and lower. This is the first study to evaluate the effects of acid rain on the growth and the yield of soybean grown in the mountains of Northern Vietnam. Full article
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