sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Sewage Sludge to Energy for Sustainability Transition

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2020) | Viewed by 3471

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Technology and Innovation, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense, Denmark
2. Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Interests: process system engineering; sustainability engineering; engineering operations management; artificial intelligence; process simulation, integration and optimization; multi-criteria decision analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of New Energy and Environment, Jilin University, Jilin 130021, China
Interests: environmental policy simulation and assessment; new energy system simulation and analysis

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China
Interests: process system engineering; green chemical engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our great pleasure to invite you to submit your most recent research on this Special Issue “Sewage Sludge to Energy for Sustainability Transition”.

Sewage sludge treatment has come to be seen as a significant challenge worldwide recently, because it contains various toxic substances, is of high risk to human health, and may potentially lead to many environmental and social problems if it cannot be treated in an appropriate way. Landfill technology is the most widely used method of sludge treatment in many countries, but this technology is not sustainable, because it poses great challenges for wastewater treatment facilities, including taking up precious space of the existing landfills, high treatment cost, risk of releasing toxins and heavy metals into the environment, and low social acceptability. On the other hand, the sludge-to-energy options that can convert waste into wealth have attracted increasing attention recently for their economic benefits and negative impact mitigation, and these alternative options are beneficial to achieve a circular economy and sustainable development.

There are various technologies/pathways for converting sewage sludge to energy (e.g., sludge incineration, sludge anaerobic digestion, sludge gasification, fast pyrolysis, and sludge for biodiesel), but the economic, environmental, and social performances of these technologies are different. The objective of this Special Issue is to build a forum for sustainability-oriented studies of sewage sludge to energy technologies for promoting the sustainable development of sewage sludge to energy. We welcome the papers in which multidisciplinary theories, tools, and methods are used for sustainability analysis and assessment, sustainability ranking and decision-making, and sustainability improvement of the technologies/processes for sewage sludge to energy, as well as for process integration and sustainable supply chain design for sewage sludge to energy.

In particular, we encourage submissions of research articles, case studies, and review articles related but not limited to the following:

  • Life cycle analysis of sewage sludge to energy processes;
  • Sustainability assessment of sewage sludge to energy technologies/processes;
  • Advances of sewage sludge to energy technologies;
  • Life cycle sustainability assessment of sewage sludge to energy processes;
  • Techno-economic analysis of sewage sludge to energy technologies/processes;
  • Circular economy or industrial symbiosis for sewage sludge to energy;
  • Multi-criteria decision analysis on sewage sludge to energy technologies/processes;
  • Sustainable supply chain design and optimization for sewage sludge to energy;
  • Innovations on sewage sludge to energy;
  • Process simulation and system analysis of sewage sludge to energy.

We believe that this Special Issue can fill the research gaps of sustainability-oriented studies and build a forum for researcher/scientists to discuss how to achieve sustainable development of sewage sludge to energy in a multi-level and multidisciplinary approach.

Dr. Jingzheng Ren
Dr. Junnian Song
Prof. Lichun Dong
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sewage treatment
  • Sludge-to-energy
  • Waste management
  • Life cycle assessment
  • Environmental impact assessment
  • Life cycle sustainability assessment
  • Techno-economic analysis
  • Sustainability assessment
  • Multi-criteria decision analysis
  • Life cycle costing
  • Social life cycle assessment
  • Circular economy

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 12837 KiB  
Article
Biogas Production and Fundamental Mass Transfer Mechanism in Anaerobic Granular Sludge
by Zohaib Ur Rehman Afridi, Wu Jing and Hassan Younas
Sustainability 2019, 11(16), 4443; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164443 - 16 Aug 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3026
Abstract
Anaerobic granules are responsible for organic degradation and biogas production in a reactor. The biogas production is entirely dependent on a mass transfer mechanism, but so far, the fundamental understanding remains poor due to the covered surface of the reactor. The study aimed [...] Read more.
Anaerobic granules are responsible for organic degradation and biogas production in a reactor. The biogas production is entirely dependent on a mass transfer mechanism, but so far, the fundamental understanding remains poor due to the covered surface of the reactor. The study aimed at investigating the fundamental mass transfer characteristics of single anaerobic granules of different sizes using microscopic imaging and analytical monitoring under single and different organic loadings. The experiment was conducted in a micro reactor and mass transfer was calculated using modified Fick’s law. Scanning electron microscopy was applied to observe biogas production zones in the granule, and a lab-scale microscope equipped with a camera revealed the biogas bubble detachment process in the micro reactor for the first time. In this experiment, the granule size was 1.32, 1.47, and 1.75 mm, but 1.75 mm granules were chosen for further investigation due to their large size. The results revealed that biogas production rates for 1.75 mm granules at initial Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) 586, 1700, and 6700 mg/L were 0.0108, 0.0236, and 0.1007 m3/kg COD, respectively; whereas the mass transfer rates were calculated as 1.83 × 10−12, 5.30 × 10−12, and 2.08 × 10−11 mg/s. It was concluded that higher organic loading and large granules enhance the mass transfer inside the reactor. Thus, large granules should be preferred in the granule-based reactor to enhance biogas production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sewage Sludge to Energy for Sustainability Transition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop