sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES)

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021) | Viewed by 64899

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil Engineering, Mechanics and Petrochemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, 09-400 Plock, Poland
Interests: energy and exergy analyses; local entropy sources; computational fluid dynamics; numerical simulations

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil Engineering, Mechanics and Petrochemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, 09-400 Plock, Poland
Interests: sustainable development of industrial energy and environment protection systems; sustainable research and innovation policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Sustainable Development of Energy, Water, and Environment Systems” is dedicated to the advancement and dissemination of knowledge on the methods, policies, and technologies for increasing the sustainability of development by de-coupling growth from the use of natural resources and by transition to a knowledge-based economy, all while taking into account the economic, environmental, and social pillars of sustainable development.

One of the main issues of the coming decades is to improve efficiencies by integrating various life-supporting systems, using the excess from one as a resource in another in the correct moment. Integrating electricity, heating, cooling, transport, water, buildings, waste, wastewater, industry, forestry, and agriculture systems will be pivotal towards sustainable development. In order to make efficiency improvements happen, political aspects of sustainable development need to be considered as well, thus implying the need for taking account of, among others, Sustainable Development Goals, resource and political security, long term planning, the role of political leaders and of voters, energy democracy, and community and citizen participation in the energy transition.

Sustainability is also a perfect field for interdisciplinary and multi-cultural evaluation of complex systems. Taking this into consideration, the Special Issue is meant to provide an opportunity for researchers in wide range areas to originate, discuss, share, and disseminate new ideas.

Prof. Dr. Krzysztof J. Wołosz
Prof. Dr. Krzysztof Urbaniec
Prof. Dr. Neven Duic
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainability comparisons and measurements
  • green economy and better governance
  • suatainable resilience of systems
  • environmental policy and management
  • energy policy
  • energy systems
  • renewable energy sources
  • waste and wastewater treatment
  • water–energy nexus
  • energy and water efficiency

Published Papers (16 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

7 pages, 190 KiB  
Editorial
Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES)
by Krzysztof J. Wołosz, Krzysztof Urbaniec and Neven Duić
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 4939; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13094939 - 28 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1527
Abstract
Sustainable development is a highly interdisciplinary concept that involves the interaction of various systems, such as energy, water, and environment, by using waste from one, as a resource in another, and in the exact moment when it is beneficial to all [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

18 pages, 6812 KiB  
Article
Post-Disaster Infrastructure Delivery for Resilience
by Mikhail Chester, Mounir El Asmar, Samantha Hayes and Cheryl Desha
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3458; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063458 - 20 Mar 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 4344
Abstract
As climate change increases the frequency and intensity of disasters and associated infrastructure damage, Alternative Project Delivery Methods are well positioned to enable innovative contracting and partnering methods for designing and delivering adaptation solutions that are more time- and cost-effective. However, where conventional [...] Read more.
As climate change increases the frequency and intensity of disasters and associated infrastructure damage, Alternative Project Delivery Methods are well positioned to enable innovative contracting and partnering methods for designing and delivering adaptation solutions that are more time- and cost-effective. However, where conventional “build-back-as-before” post-disaster reconstruction occurs, communities remain vulnerable to future disasters of similar or greater magnitude. In this conceptual paper, we draw on a variety of literature and emergent practices to present how such alternative delivery methods of reconstruction projects can systematically integrate “build-back-better” and introduce more resilient infrastructure outcomes. Considering existing knowledge regarding infrastructure resilience, post-disaster reconstruction and project delivery methods, we consider the resilience regimes of rebound, robustness, graceful extensibility, and sustained adaptability to present the potential for alternative project delivery methods to improve the agility and flexibility of infrastructure against future climate-related and other hazards. We discuss the criticality of continued pursuit of stakeholder engagement to support further improvements to project delivery methods, enabling new opportunities for engaging with a broader set of stakeholders, and for stakeholders to contribute new knowledge and insights to the design process. We conclude the significant potential for such methods to enable resilient infrastructure outcomes, through prioritizing resilience alongside time and cost. We also present a visual schematic in the form of a framework for enabling post-disaster infrastructure delivery for resilience outcomes, across different scales and timeframes of reconstruction. The findings have immediate implications for agencies managing disaster recovery efforts, offering decision-support for improving the adaptive capacity of infrastructure, the services they deliver, and capacities of the communities that rely on them. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 2766 KiB  
Article
Introducing a Degrowth Approach to the Circular Economy Policies of Food Production, and Food Loss and Waste Management: Towards a Circular Bioeconomy
by Daniel Hoehn, Jara Laso, María Margallo, Israel Ruiz-Salmón, Francisco José Amo-Setién, Rebeca Abajas-Bustillo, Carmen Sarabia, Ainoa Quiñones, Ian Vázquez-Rowe, Alba Bala, Laura Batlle-Bayer, Pere Fullana-i-Palmer and Rubén Aldaco
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3379; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063379 - 18 Mar 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 6723
Abstract
There is a growing debate surrounding the contradiction between an unremitting increase in the use of resources and the search for environmental sustainability. Therefore, the concept of sustainable degrowth is emerging aiming to introduce in our societies new social values and new policies, [...] Read more.
There is a growing debate surrounding the contradiction between an unremitting increase in the use of resources and the search for environmental sustainability. Therefore, the concept of sustainable degrowth is emerging aiming to introduce in our societies new social values and new policies, capable of satisfying human requirements whilst reducing environmental impacts and consumption of resources. In this framework, circular economy strategies for food production and food loss and waste management systems, following the Sustainable Development Goals agenda, are being developed based on a search for circularity, but without setting limits to the continual increase in environmental impacts and resource use. This work presents a methodology for determining the percentage of degrowth needed in any food supply chain, by analyzing four scenarios in a life cycle assessment approach over time between 2020 and 2040. Results for the Spanish case study suggested a degrowth need of 26.8% in 2015 and 58.9% in 2040 in order to achieve compliance with the Paris Agreement targets, highlighting the reduction of meat and fish and seafood consumption as the most useful path. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1565 KiB  
Article
Micro-Hydropower in Nepal: Analysing the Project Process to Understand Drivers that Strengthen and Weaken Sustainability
by Joe Butchers, Sam Williamson and Julian Booker
Sustainability 2021, 13(3), 1582; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031582 - 2 Feb 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 5090
Abstract
Evaluating the sustainable operation of community-owned and community-operated renewable energy projects is complex. The development of a project often depends on the actions of diverse stakeholders, including the government, industry and communities. Throughout the project cycle, these interrelated actions impact the sustainability of [...] Read more.
Evaluating the sustainable operation of community-owned and community-operated renewable energy projects is complex. The development of a project often depends on the actions of diverse stakeholders, including the government, industry and communities. Throughout the project cycle, these interrelated actions impact the sustainability of the project. In this paper, the typical project cycle of a micro-hydropower plant in Nepal is used to demonstrate that key events throughout the project cycle affect a plant’s ability to operate sustainably. Through a critical analysis of the available literature, policy and project documentation and interviews with manufacturers, drivers that affect the sustainability of plants are found. Examples include weak specification of civil components during tendering, quality control issues during manufacture, poor quality of construction and trained operators leaving their position. Opportunities to minimise both the occurrence and the severity of threats to sustainability are identified. For the micro-hydropower industry in Nepal, recommendations are made for specific actions by the relevant stakeholders at appropriate moments in the project cycle. More broadly, the findings demonstrate that the complex nature of developing community energy projects requires a holistic consideration of the complete project process. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

28 pages, 12715 KiB  
Article
Key Challenges in the Status Analysis for the Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan in Podgorica, Montenegro
by Radoje Vujadinović, Jelena Šaković Jovanović, Aljaž Plevnik, Luka Mladenovič and Tom Rye
Sustainability 2021, 13(3), 1037; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031037 - 20 Jan 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3282
Abstract
The paper presents the results of the application of a practical approach for collecting data, which provides a simple, cost efficient, and easily reproducible method that was applied to obtain the necessary data for the status analysis of the Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan [...] Read more.
The paper presents the results of the application of a practical approach for collecting data, which provides a simple, cost efficient, and easily reproducible method that was applied to obtain the necessary data for the status analysis of the Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan (SUMP) for Podgorica, the capital of Montenegro. Important data for the estimation of the existing condition of the traffic system were collected through desk research from the appropriate institutions and organizations. Several surveys and focus group interviews were conducted, in which about 5000 residents of Podgorica participated. In addition to answering questions, residents made numerous suggestions, confirming the correctness of a participatory approach in the new traffic planning paradigm that provides the SUMP with crucial advantages. A manual cordon count of traffic on five bridges for the traffic of the motor vehicles, as well as on two pedestrian-only bridges, was performed by students from the study program Road Traffic, and there are plans to repeat this in the coming years in order to enable more reliable monitoring and evaluation of the obtained data. Contemporary quality management tools such as BYPAD and ParkPAD were also used to assess the status of cycling and parking policy, respectively. It is especially important to emphasize that Podgorica is the first city in the West Balkans, and the fourth city in Europe, in which the ParkPAD tool was applied. A wide range of negative phenomena and trends was identified, like a rapid increase in the number of registered vehicles, an increase in the motorization rate and the number of traffic accidents, increased non-compliance with traffic rules, excessive use of passenger cars and auto-taxi vehicles, insufficient use of unattractive public transport, walking and cycling, etc. Based on the data collected, key challenges in status analysis in Podgorica were identified, which the SUMP should try to overcome. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 3818 KiB  
Article
Leveraging Digital Twin for Sustainability Assessment of an Educational Building
by Lavinia Chiara Tagliabue, Fulvio Re Cecconi, Sebastiano Maltese, Stefano Rinaldi, Angelo Luigi Camillo Ciribini and Alessandra Flammini
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020480 - 6 Jan 2021
Cited by 90 | Viewed by 8495
Abstract
The EU Green Deal, beginning in 2019, promoted a roadmap for operating the transition to a sustainable EU economy by turning climate issues and environmental challenges into opportunities in all policy areas and making the transition fair and inclusive for all. Focusing on [...] Read more.
The EU Green Deal, beginning in 2019, promoted a roadmap for operating the transition to a sustainable EU economy by turning climate issues and environmental challenges into opportunities in all policy areas and making the transition fair and inclusive for all. Focusing on the built environment, the voluntary adoption of rating systems for sustainability assessment is growing, with an increasing market value, and is perceived as a social responsibility both by public administration and by private companies. This paper proposes a framework for shifting from a static sustainability assessment to a digital twin (DT)-based and Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled dynamic approach. This new approach allows for a real-time evaluation and control of a wide range of sustainability criteria with a user-centered point of view. A pilot building, namely, the eLUX lab cognitive building in the University of Brescia, was used to test the framework with some sample applications. The educational building accommodates the daily activities of the engineering students by constantly interacting with the sensorized asset monitoring indoor comfort and air quality conditions as well as the energy behavior of the building in order to optimize the trade-off with renewable energy production. The framework is the cornerstone of a methodology exploiting the digital twin approach to support the decision processes related to sustainability through the whole building’s life cycle. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 3341 KiB  
Article
Sustainability Assessment of Electricity Generation in Niger Using a Weighted Multi-Criteria Decision Approach
by Ramchandra Bhandari, Benjamin Eduardo Arce, Vittorio Sessa and Rabani Adamou
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 385; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010385 - 4 Jan 2021
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 3895
Abstract
The majority of Niger’s population faces a widespread lack of access to electricity. Although the country lies in the Sahara belt, exploitation of solar energy is so far minimal. Due to ongoing fossil fuel exploration in the country, this fuel might dominate the [...] Read more.
The majority of Niger’s population faces a widespread lack of access to electricity. Although the country lies in the Sahara belt, exploitation of solar energy is so far minimal. Due to ongoing fossil fuel exploration in the country, this fuel might dominate the future electricity supply. Today, Niger imports the most of its electricity from Nigeria. There is a need to expand electricity generation and supply infrastructures in Niger. When doing so, it is important to choose a proper set of electricity generation resource/technology that fulfils sustainability criteria. Thus, the objective of this work is to analyze a methodology in order to assess different energy technologies for Niger. A multi-criteria decision approach was selected to assess the most accessible energy system for the country. For this purpose, indicators were developed and weighted for ranking electricity generation options. Altogether 40 indicators are selected under six dimensions (availability, risk, technology, economics, environment and social) to assess eight different alternatives, considering the aggregated results and corresponding scores under each dimension. A merit list of technology and resources for electricity generation presented in this work could support the stakeholders in their decision-making for further projects implementation in the country. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 871 KiB  
Article
Potential of Bioenergy in Rural Ghana
by Nii Nelson, Jo Darkwa, John Calautit, Mark Worall, Robert Mokaya, Eunice Adjei, Francis Kemausuor and Julius Ahiekpor
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 381; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010381 - 4 Jan 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3533
Abstract
Crop residues are common in rural Ghana due to the predominant role agriculture plays in livelihood activities in these communities. In this paper we investigate the prospects of exploiting agricultural crop residues for rural development in Ghana through bioenergy schemes. A theoretical energy [...] Read more.
Crop residues are common in rural Ghana due to the predominant role agriculture plays in livelihood activities in these communities. In this paper we investigate the prospects of exploiting agricultural crop residues for rural development in Ghana through bioenergy schemes. A theoretical energy potential of 623.84 PJ per year, which is equivalent to 19,781 MW was estimated using crop production data from the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations and residue-to-product ratios. Ghana has a total installed generation capacity of 4577 MW which is four times less the energy potential of crop residues in the country. Cocoa pod husks were identified as important biomass resources for energy generation as they are currently wasted. To further assess the energy potential of cocoa pod husks, different cocoa pod husks samples were collected across the six cocoa growing regions in Ghana and thermo-chemically characterised using proximate and ultimate analysis. The low levels of nitrogen and sulphur observed, together with the high heating value, suggest that cocoa pod husks and for that matter crop residues are eco-friendly feedstock that can be used to power rural communities in Ghana. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 398 KiB  
Article
A Case Study of Socially-Accepted Potentials for the Use of End User Flexibility by Home Energy Management Systems
by Christian Pfeiffer, Markus Puchegger, Claudia Maier, Ina V. Tomaschitz, Thomas P. Kremsner and Lukas Gnam
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010132 - 25 Dec 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2451
Abstract
Due to the increase of volatile renewable energy resources, additional flexibility will be necessary in the electricity system in the future to ensure a technically and economically efficient network operation. Although home energy management systems hold potential for a supply of flexibility to [...] Read more.
Due to the increase of volatile renewable energy resources, additional flexibility will be necessary in the electricity system in the future to ensure a technically and economically efficient network operation. Although home energy management systems hold potential for a supply of flexibility to the grid, private end users often neglect or even ignore recommendations regarding beneficial behavior. In this work, the social acceptance and requirements of a participatively developed home energy management system with focus on (i) system support optimization, (ii) self-consumption and self-sufficiency optimization, and (iii) additional comfort functions are determined. Subsequently, the socially-accepted flexibility potential of the home energy management system is estimated. Using methods of online household survey, cluster analysis, and energy-economic optimization, the socially-accepted techno-economic potential of households in a three-community cluster sample area is computed. Results show about a third of the participants accept the developed system. This yields a shiftable load of nearly 1.8 MW within the small sample area. Furthermore, the system yields the considerably larger monetary surplus on the supplier-side due to its focus on system support optimization. New electricity market opportunities are necessary to adequately reward a systemically useful load behavior of households. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 5480 KiB  
Article
Quantification of the Coordination Degree between Dianchi Lake Protection and Watershed Social-Economic Development: A Scenario-Based Analysis
by Hansheng Kong, Yilei Lu, Xin Dong and Siyu Zeng
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010116 - 24 Dec 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2183
Abstract
Dianchi Lake is the largest freshwater lake on the Yunnan–Guizhou Plateau near Kunming City, China. As one of the most polluted lakes in China, although billions of U.S. dollars have been spent trying to clean it up, water pollution and eutrophication are still [...] Read more.
Dianchi Lake is the largest freshwater lake on the Yunnan–Guizhou Plateau near Kunming City, China. As one of the most polluted lakes in China, although billions of U.S. dollars have been spent trying to clean it up, water pollution and eutrophication are still a bottleneck for regional sustainable development. This research established an integrated approach for the evaluation of the coupling coordination degree to support future planning of the Dianchi Lake basin. Ten future scenarios for possible development directions of Dianchi Lake basin were designed to find the best balance between development and protection. Among these scenarios, a high protection–medium development scenario is the most suitable scenario for future development planning. To further improve the coordination degree, economic growth control and non-point source governance were the most effective and feasible approaches. Furthermore, a water quality model was used to verify the coordination degree. It was found that the high protection–medium development scenario can reach the water quality target in 2025. The coordination degree evaluation could be a practical link to help equilibrate the socio-economic development and environmental protection of the Dianchi Lake basin. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 4980 KiB  
Article
Life Cycle Assessment and Indoor Environmental Quality of Wooden Family Houses
by Silvia Vilčeková, Katarína Harčárová, Andrea Moňoková and Eva Krídlová Burdová
Sustainability 2020, 12(24), 10557; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410557 - 17 Dec 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2717
Abstract
This article analyzes in detail the impact of wooden houses on the environment using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology and at the same time evaluates the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in these houses. The investigated detached family houses had a wooden structure. [...] Read more.
This article analyzes in detail the impact of wooden houses on the environment using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology and at the same time evaluates the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in these houses. The investigated detached family houses had a wooden structure. The first one had a bearing system made of a wooden frame; other materials were conventional. The second house was built entirely of log wood. Given the high risk of greenhouse gas emissions, the concentration of which in the atmosphere is causing global climate change, the global warming potential (GWP) indicator is crucial. According to results, the family house built entirely of wood and with a biomass boiler significantly reduces CO2 emissions and is therefore considered from the LCA point of view as a more suitable alternative compared to a house with a wooden frame structure. The building materials with the highest share involved in the creation of GWP include concrete structures (38–48%), ceramic roof tiles (33%) and plasterboard (15%). Plasterboard cladding (55%), concrete structures (17–19%), oriented strand board OSB (9–22%), impregnated wooden structures (31–52%) and plastic windows (9%) are the most involved in acidification potential (AP) and eutrophication potential (EP). Plasterboard structures (21%), impregnated wood materials (47.4%), reinforced concrete structures (12%) and mineral wool and roof tiles significantly contribute to the creation of photochemical ozone creation potential (POCP) and ozone depletion potential (ODP). The indoor environmental quality was evaluated through short-term measurements of basic physico-chemical parameters. Since both houses have different characteristics, the aim of this monitoring was to evaluate the actual state of IEQ in selected wooden houses under real conditions. Based on the recorded results, it can be stated that neither presented wooden house, in terms of thermal-humidity microclimate, concentration of CO2 and particulate matter, represents an environment with a negative impact on their occupants. With regards to volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the increased concentrations of xylenes and tetrachlorethylene in the log house were probably caused by the application of impregnation and protective coatings six months before monitoring. In this case, the concentration of tetrachloroethene, which is considered a potential carcinogen, was six times higher than the legislative limit. For VOCs, such as limonene, isobutylene and n-butylacetate, which were found in the wooden frame house, no limits are set. The legislative limits for xylenes and tetrachlorethylene in this house have not been exceeded, and therefore the IEQ cannot yet be considered harmful for health. The presence of all the mentioned VOCs in the interior air of the wooden frame house is more related to the activities of occupants, as this house has been inhabited for several years. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 2341 KiB  
Article
Benefit Assessment of Skidder Powertrain Hybridization Utilizing a Novel Cascade Optimization Algorithm
by Juraj Karlušić, Mihael Cipek, Danijel Pavković, Željko Šitum, Juraj Benić and Marijan Šušnjar
Sustainability 2020, 12(24), 10396; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410396 - 12 Dec 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1765
Abstract
Over the last decade, off-road vehicles have been increasingly hybridized through powertrain electrification in terms of additional electrical machine-based propulsion and battery energy storage, with the goal of achieving significant gains in fuel economy and reductions in greenhouse gases emissions. Since hybrid powertrains [...] Read more.
Over the last decade, off-road vehicles have been increasingly hybridized through powertrain electrification in terms of additional electrical machine-based propulsion and battery energy storage, with the goal of achieving significant gains in fuel economy and reductions in greenhouse gases emissions. Since hybrid powertrains consist of two or more different energy sources and may be arranged in many different configurations, there are many open questions in their design and powertrain energy management control, which may have influence on the hybridized powertrain purchase cost and efficiency. This paper presents simple backward optimization models of conventional and hybrid cable skidder powertrains. These models are then used in the optimization of control variables over one forest path in order to find the minimum possible fuel consumption. The optimization results show that 15% fuel efficiency improvement in winching and skid trail driving can be achieved with the selected hybrid powertrain. With that improvement, main hybrid drive components can be paid off in 13 years. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 5739 KiB  
Article
Building Sustainably: A Pilot Study on the Project Manager’s Contribution in Delivering Sustainable Construction Projects—A Maltese and International Perspective
by Ruth Borg, Rebecca Dalli Gonzi and Simon Paul Borg
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 10162; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122310162 - 5 Dec 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 4165
Abstract
Despite ample technological advancements, the building industry is still seen as an unsustainable activity. To counteract this, building development is now being requested to be more sustainable. Due to the increasing complexity of sustainable projects’ criteria, the project manager’s role, tasked with the [...] Read more.
Despite ample technological advancements, the building industry is still seen as an unsustainable activity. To counteract this, building development is now being requested to be more sustainable. Due to the increasing complexity of sustainable projects’ criteria, the project manager’s role, tasked with the overall management of a building’s different development phases, is changing, becoming increasingly crucial for the attainment of pre-established sustainability goals. Based on this premise, the research presented in this paper is a pilot study set to preliminarily establish and identify a set of project management processes and supporting practices from existing literature, and gauge their significance and possible added value provided. This was done via a purposely designed questionnaire distributed locally, in Malta, and globally amongst established project managers. Notwithstanding the preliminary nature of the study some interesting results were obtained. Among the main outcomes of the study, it is observed how all respondents are very aware about sustainability issues and that their decision-making role places them in an optimum position to bring forward a sustainability agenda for a particular project. In terms of intervention, pre-construction (43%) and construction (28%) were considered to be the main stages were a project manager usually gives the highest input. However, various challenges were also highlighted by the respondents, including clients’ refusal to commit increased capital (34%), the requirement for further training (33%), and the lack of incentives aimed towards increasing the sustainability of projects (22%). Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 330 KiB  
Article
Cost–Benefit Analysis of Municipal Sludge as a Low-Grade Nutrient Source: A Case Study from South Africa
by Eyob Habte Tesfamariam, Zekarias Mihreteab Ogbazghi, John George Annandale and Yemane Gebrehiwot
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 9950; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12239950 - 28 Nov 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3129
Abstract
Municipal sludge has economic value as a low-grade fertilizer as it consists of appreciable amounts of the macro and micronutrients. When using sludge as fertilizer, the economic aspect should be taken into account. In this study, the following specific objectives were identified: (a) [...] Read more.
Municipal sludge has economic value as a low-grade fertilizer as it consists of appreciable amounts of the macro and micronutrients. When using sludge as fertilizer, the economic aspect should be taken into account. In this study, the following specific objectives were identified: (a) to investigate the economic feasibility of using sludge as a fertilizer; (b) to estimate the maximum economic distance sludge can be transported as a fertilizer; and (c) to test the economic feasibility of selling sludge using commercial inorganic fertilizer as a bench mark. The study showed that for anaerobically digested, paddy dried, municipal sludge consisting of 3% N, 2% P, and 0.3% K the economic feasibility of transporting the sludge was limited to a diameter of 20 km in the arid zone, 28 km in the semi-arid zone, 51 km in the sub humid zone, 66 km in the humid zone, and 75 km in the super-humid zone. Therefore, the economic feasibility of using sludge as a substitute for or complementary to commercial inorganic fertilizer is dictated by the distance between the wastewater care work and the farm, sludge nutrient concentration, agro-ecological zone (rain and temperature), and the real-time commercial inorganic fertilizer price. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

24 pages, 1343 KiB  
Review
Valorization of Tropical Biomass Waste by Supercritical Fluid Extraction Technology
by Yee Ho Chai, Suzana Yusup, Wan Nadiah Amalina Kadir, Chung Yiin Wong, Siti Suhailah Rosli, Muhammad Syafiq Hazwan Ruslan, Bridgid Lai Fui Chin and Chung Loong Yiin
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010233 - 29 Dec 2020
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 4770
Abstract
The inception of sustainable and cleaner extraction technology has paved the way for the innovative development of nonconventional extractions, such as supercritical fluid extraction, apart from conventional extraction counterparts. The concept of biomass waste-to-wealth for the conversion of biomass waste or by-products into [...] Read more.
The inception of sustainable and cleaner extraction technology has paved the way for the innovative development of nonconventional extractions, such as supercritical fluid extraction, apart from conventional extraction counterparts. The concept of biomass waste-to-wealth for the conversion of biomass waste or by-products into value-added products for diversified applications had piqued the prominent interest of researchers and industry players, especially with the abundance of biomass resources readily available in tropical regions that have yet to be tapped into to reach their full potential. In this paper, a critical review of the developments of supercritical fluid technology from its initial inception up to commercialized scalability, including its limitations, extraction of potential tropical biomass wastes for various types of applications, such as biopesticides, bio-repellents, phenolics, and lipids for biofuel, and its role in circular bioeconomy and sustainable development approaches, are discussed in detail. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 12518 KiB  
Review
Enablers and Barriers for Creating a Marketplace for Construction and Demolition Waste: A Systematic Literature Review
by Savindi Caldera, Tim Ryley and Nikita Zatyko
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 9931; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12239931 - 27 Nov 2020
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 4308
Abstract
Rapid population growth and urbanization have led to an increase in Construction and Demolition (C&D) waste, prompting government and industry bodies to develop better waste management practices. Waste trading has emerged as a targeted intervention to divert waste from landfill sites and create [...] Read more.
Rapid population growth and urbanization have led to an increase in Construction and Demolition (C&D) waste, prompting government and industry bodies to develop better waste management practices. Waste trading has emerged as a targeted intervention to divert waste from landfill sites and create a second life for waste material. This paper examines key barriers and enablers influencing the creation of a marketplace for waste trading. A systematic literature review was undertaken to examine global efforts in creating a marketplace for C&D waste. A framework on enablers and barriers for developing a marketplace for C&D waste emerged from the review, based on market-based, operational, and governance factors. References demonstrated that markets for materials such as glass and metals have already been established, but there are increasing marketplace opportunities for other recycled materials. Technology-based market applications are emerging as targeted interventions to facilitate online trading, which will provide a more accessible and user-friendly marketplace for sellers and buyers. Further research should test the complex interactions between people and technology associated with online waste trading platforms, as well as help develop the business case for a C&D waste marketplace. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop