Special Issue "Human Geography"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe T. Cirella
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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

People and the environment, the physical and the human, are at the core of Sustainability. The overarching scope of this Special Issue (SI) on “Human Geography” brings together all of its subdisciplines by exploring “interrelationships between people, place, and environment, and how these vary spatially and temporally across and between locations” [1]. The five main divisions of human geographical study—economic, cultural, social, political, and historical—reflect the central disciplines with which human geographers interconnect [1–7]. All five remain fundamentally focalized on specific areas of concentration, notably—for example—urban. Human geography refers to the study of people as well as “geographical interpretations of economies, cultural identities, political territories, and societies” [8]. Human beings and their expansiveness to create settlements interplay to innovate and develop a nature-based relationship. This relationship is a balancing act of ethos and science and multidisciplinary as it pertains to the vast array of issues, perspectives, and challenges human beings face [9, 10]. This SI in “Human Geography” is an expansive thematic call to all its subdisciplines. Fundamental geographical concepts that explore space, place, scale, landscape, mobility, and nature in union with appropriate methods (i.e., quantitative and qualitative as well as newer methods in spatial analysis, spatial statistics, and GIS) are welcome. “These concepts foreground the notion that the world operates spatially and temporally, and that social relations do not operate independently of place and environment, but are thoroughly grounded in and through them” [1]. The context of this SI invites, under the umbrella of human geography-based study, open-ended exploration to real-world principles, theories, models, techniques, hypotheses, theorems, and concepts by way of—novel, reviewed, or tested—experimentation and thought. Submissions will exemplify novelty, technical depth, elegance, practical or theoretic impact, and presentation.

References

  1. Hall, L.M. Human Geography Research Guides Available online: https://researchguides.dartmouth.edu/human_geography (accessed on Dec 12, 2019).
  2. Aitken, S.C.; Valentine, G.; Clarke, D.B. Approaches to Human Geography Approaches to Human Geography: Philosophies, Theories, People and Practices; Sage Publications: Los Angeles, 2014; ISBN 9781446276020.
  3. Cresswell, T. Place: A Short Introduction; Wiley: Malden, MA, 2004; ISBN 1405106727.
  4. De Blij, H.J. The power of place: Geography, destiny, and globalization’s rough landscape; Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2009; ISBN 0195367707.
  5. Johnston, R.; Sidaway, J.D. Geography and geographers, Anglo- American human geography since 1945; Arnold: London, 2015; ISBN 9780340985106.
  6. Adey, P. Aerial life: Spaces, mobilities, affects; Wiley-Blackwell: Chichester, 2010; ISBN 9781405182614.
  7. Phillips, M. Contested worlds: An introduction to human geography; Ashgate: New York, 2005; ISBN 0754641120.
  8. Gibson, C. Human Geography. In International Encyclopedia of Human Geography; Elsevier Inc., 2009; pp. 218–231 ISBN 9780080449104.
  9. Cirella, G.T.; Mwangi, S.W.; Paczoski, A.; Abebe, S.T. Chapter 1. Human-nature relations: The unwanted filibuster. In Sustainable human-nature relations: Environmental scholarship, economic evaluation, urban strategies; Cirella, G.T., Ed.; Springer Singapore: Singapore, 2020 ISBN 9789811530487.
  10. UN (2019) World Urbanization Prospects: The 2018 Revision. New York: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs.

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe T. Cirella
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

Human Geography and all its subdisciplines

  • Cultural geography
  • Development geography
  • Economic geography
  • Health or medical geography
  • Historical geography
  • Industrial geography
  • Political geography
  • Population geography or demography
  • Regional development and planning
  • Rural geography
  • Social geography
  • Transport geography
  • Urban geography

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Territorial Effects of Shared-Living Heritage Regeneration
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8616; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208616 - 17 Oct 2020
Abstract
The paper presents further steps of study started by authors in recent years, as part of the widest international research collaboration, which focuses on shared life and regeneration of abandonment of rural settlements as strategies for the development of sustainable territories. This research [...] Read more.
The paper presents further steps of study started by authors in recent years, as part of the widest international research collaboration, which focuses on shared life and regeneration of abandonment of rural settlements as strategies for the development of sustainable territories. This research aims to understand how the regeneration of ancient community buildings impacts on the sustainable development of the local context. To understand these effects, the research considered four traditional typologies of community buildings, from different cultures: Tulou (China), Cascina (Italy), Hacienda (Mexico), and Marae (New Zealand). Among the tens/hundreds of contemporary regeneration interventions, three contemporary projects per each of these typologies have been selected. To assess the territorial impact of the projects a new approach has been defined using Expert Interviews as the methodology, so as to be able to have an assessment directly by experts in the fields of regenerative projects and sustainable development. The Expert Interviews were held based on a questionnaire that assessed the effects of the projects. For the evaluation of the projects, two categories of indicators have been selected: (1) United Nations SDGs, (2) architectural regeneration indicators generated by the study “The Role of Cultural Heritage in Sustainable Development: Multidimensional Indicators as Decision-Making Tool”, by Francesca Nocca, published in Sustainability (2017, 9, 1882). The research outputs show how the urban-architectural regeneration of these historical typologies can be clearly associated with indications of sustainable development. The results also show that in all four cultures the regeneration of historic buildings provides many benefits to local communities by successfully mixing different income groups and the inclusion of marginalized or vulnerable groups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Geography)
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Open AccessArticle
Research on Population Development in Ethnic Minority Areas in the Context of China’s Population Strategy Adjustment
Sustainability 2020, 12(19), 8021; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12198021 - 28 Sep 2020
Abstract
Against the background of China’s relaxation of family planning standards, this thesis analyzed the demographic trends in ethnic minority areas and their impacts on regional development under China’s adjustment of its population strategy. By setting up different fertility scenarios, the population forecasting software [...] Read more.
Against the background of China’s relaxation of family planning standards, this thesis analyzed the demographic trends in ethnic minority areas and their impacts on regional development under China’s adjustment of its population strategy. By setting up different fertility scenarios, the population forecasting software (PADIS-INT) was applied to forecast the population scale and structure of the Hotan region. This thesis analyzed the impacts of population growth on regional sustainable development from the perspectives of employment, economic development, and resource carrying capacity to provide references for the formulation and implementation of population and economic development policies in minority areas, to alleviate the contradiction between the human and environment. The results showed that the Hotan region would maintain a relatively fast population growth rate for a long period; by 2050, its population would skew younger when compared to China’s general statistics. However, due to the lagging economic development and the constraints to resources and the environment, unemployment would become the most severe problem hampering regional development. While developing its local economy, the Hotan region needs to better promote the interregional migration of the labor force. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Geography)
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Open AccessArticle
Research on Network Patterns and Influencing Factors of Population Flow and Migration in the Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration, China
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 6803; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176803 - 21 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Through the construction of a population flow and migration relationship matrix, this paper analyzes population flow and migration in the Yangtze River Delta urban agglomeration during the Spring Festival travel rush and daily period. This paper also studies the urban network spatial structure [...] Read more.
Through the construction of a population flow and migration relationship matrix, this paper analyzes population flow and migration in the Yangtze River Delta urban agglomeration during the Spring Festival travel rush and daily period. This paper also studies the urban network spatial structure characteristics and the influencing factors from the perspective of inter-provincial population flow and migration. The results show the following: (1) as a central city, Shanghai has a significant siphon effect, with Suzhou, Nanjing, Hangzhou, Ningbo, Wuxi and Changzhou accumulating 86.95% of the incoming population. The Shanghai–Jiangsu cross-border floating population is active and accounts for 40.83% of the total mobility scale in the same period. The population flow and migration network in the Yangtze River Delta urban agglomeration shows obvious hierarchical characteristics. The secondary network relationship during the Spring Festival travel rush is the main migration path, while the first-level network relationship in the daily period is the main flow path. (2) Three indicators, namely, the network density, mean centrality, and control force based on the population flow and migration, consistently show that the Yangtze River Delta urban agglomeration network presents a strong connection state with the formation of a local cluster structure, highlighting that the city tightness in terms of population flow and migration also has dual attributes, which refers to “the restriction of the geographic space effect” and “overcoming the friction of space”. (3) Economic scale, political resources, industrial structure, and the historical basis are important factors influencing the formation of population flows and migration networks. Employment opportunities and labor wages are key guiding factors of the population migration direction, and spatial distance is a conditional factor influencing the formation of population flows and migration networks. The inter-provincial boundary, temporal distance, and transboundary frequency are the decisive factors for the formation of network patterns of population flow and migration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Geography)
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