Special Issue "Urban Sustainability: A Smart, Compact Future in Landscape Architecture"

A special issue of Urban Science (ISSN 2413-8851).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 January 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe T. Cirella

1. Polo Centre of Sustainability, Via Nizza, 5/8, 18100 Imperia IM, Italy
2. University of Gdansk, 80-309 Gdańsk, Poland
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: human geography; sustainability; consumption; globalisation and resources; sustainability indices and trends; interdisciplinary societal studies
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alessio Russo

1. Polo Centre of Sustainability, Via Nizza, 5/8, 18100 Imperia IM, Italy
2. University of Gloucestershire, GL50 2RH Cheltenham, UK
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: smart cities; ecosystem services; sustainable landscape design; urban sustainability; green infrastructure

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Urban Sustainability: A Smart, Compact Future in Landscape Architecture” is a Special Issue organized in conjunction with the 2nd International Conference on Sustainability, Human Geography and Environment 2018 (ICSHGE18). This Special Issue calls on landscape architects, urban planners and designers, human geographers, botanists, horticulturalists, architects, industrial designers, soil scientists, environmental psychologists, sociologists, ecologists, civil engineers, etc.

The world’s population is rapidly increasing and will top 9.7 billion by 2050 (United Nations, 2015). By 2025, two thirds of the world’s population will be concentrated in urban areas, increasing the importance of providing not only environmental quality and livable spaces but food security and resilient food systems (Haberman et al., 2014). This advanced rate of urbanization has coincided with global environmental degradation, increased consumption of natural resources, habitat loss, and overall ecosystem change (Daily, 1995; McDonald et al., 2013; McNeill, 2000). A cause-and-effect reproach from escalating global population brings to the forefront the need to re-examine how urban spaces are developed, used, and urban inhabitants fed (Ackerman et al., 2014). Recent research has focused on the use of regulating and cultural ecosystem services (ES) for improving environmental, social, and economic conditions in cities (Haase et al., 2014). Some key issues include concepts that focus on urban green infrastructure such as hybrid infrastructure of green and built systems (e.g., urban forests, wetlands, parks, green roofs, and walls that together can contribute to ecosystem resilience) and human benefits through their ecological processes or ES (Demuzere et al., 2014; Russo et al., 2016). These benefits are also referred to as nature-based solutions in which green infrastructure is incorporated into urban management, planning, design, and socio-political practices and policies for climate mitigation and adaptation.

Within this framework, “Urban Sustainability: A Smart, Compact Future in Landscape Architecture” focuses on cities and how to better the urban–human experience. Researchers are invited to contribute original research articles that look at and understand novel knowledge central to this theme. Articles will exemplify novelty, technical depth, practical or theoretic impact and presentation. This Special Issue will include revised and substantially extended versions of selected papers presented at ICSHGE18; conversely, researchers unable to participate are strongly encouraged to submit articles for this call.

References

 Ackerman, K.; Conard, M.; Culligan, P.; Plunz, R.; Sutto, M.P.; Whittinghill, L. Sustainable food systems for future cities: The potential of urban agriculture. Econ. Soc. Rev. (Irel) 2014, 45(2), 189–206, doi:http://www.esr.ie/issue/archive.

Daily, G.C. Restoring Value to the World’s Degraded Lands. Science (80-. ). 1995, 269, 350–354, doi:10.1126/science.269.5222.350.

Demuzere, M.; Orru, K.; Heidrich, O.; Olazabal, E.; Geneletti, D.; Orru, H.; Bhave, A.G.; Mittal, N.; Feliu, E.; Faehnle, M. Mitigating and adapting to climate change: Multi-functional and multi-scale assessment of green urban infrastructure. J. Environ. Manag. 2014, 146, 107–115, doi:10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.07.025.

Haberman, D.; Gillies, L.; Canter, A.; Rinner, V.; Pancrazi, L.; Martellozzo, F. The Potential of Urban Agriculture in Montréal: A Quantitative Assessment. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Information 2014, 3(3), 1101–1117, doi:10.3390/ijgi3031101.

Haase, D.; Larondelle, N.; Andersson, E.; Artmann, M.; Borgström, S.; Breuste, J.; Gomez-Baggethun, E.; Gren, Å.; Hamstead, Z.; Hansen, R.; et al. A Quantitative Review of Urban Ecosystem Service Assessments: Concepts, Models, and Implementation. Ambio 2014, 43(4), 413–433, doi:10.1007/s13280-014-0504-0.

McDonald, R.I.; Marcotullio, P.J.; Güneralp, B. Urbanization and Global Trends in Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. In Urbanization, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services: Challenges and Opportunities; Elmqvist, T., Fragkias, M., Goodness, J., Güneralp, B., Marcotullio, P.J., McDonald, R.I., Parnell, S., Schewenius, M., Sendstad, M., Seto, K.C., Wilkinson, C., Eds. Springer Netherlands, Dordrecht, 2013; p. 755. doi:10.1007/978-94-007-7088-1_3.

McNeill, J.R. Something New Under the Sun: An Environmental History of the Twentieth-Century World; W.W. Norton and Company, New York, 2000.

Russo, A.; Escobedo, F.J.; Zerbe, S. Quantifying the local-scale ecosystem services provided by urban treed streetscapes in Bolzano, Italy. AIMS Environ. Sci. 2016, 3(1), 58–76, doi:10.3934/environsci.2016.1.58.

United Nations. World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision, Key Findings and Advance Tables. Working Paper No. ESA/P/WP.241, 2015.

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe T. Cirella
Prof. Dr. Alessio Russo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Urban Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • landscape design
  • landscape architecture
  • sustainability
  • sustainable consumption
  • smart cities
  • compact cities
  • garden cities
  • urban phenomena
  • urban and city planning
  • urban sustainability
  • urban studies
  • urban fabric
  • urban biodiversity
  • urban soil toxicity
  • urban agriculture
  • urban food security
  • ecology
  • edible forest gardens
  • green sustainability
  • green infrastructure
  • biophilic urbanism
  • human beings and nature
  • nature-based solutions
  • space and time
  • spatial planning
  • sharing economy
  • policy innovation
  • social practices
  • social innovation
  • experience and perception
  • health and horticultural therapy
  • ecosystem services
  • ecosystem disservices

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Selecting Potential Moss Species for Green Roofs in the Mediterranean Basin
Urban Sci. 2019, 3(2), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci3020057
Received: 26 March 2019 / Revised: 7 May 2019 / Accepted: 23 May 2019 / Published: 26 May 2019
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Abstract
Green roofs are important infrastructures to address the effects of climate change in urban areas. However, most studies and applications have been done in cooler and wetter regions of the northern hemisphere. Climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, such as [...] Read more.
Green roofs are important infrastructures to address the effects of climate change in urban areas. However, most studies and applications have been done in cooler and wetter regions of the northern hemisphere. Climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, such as increased drought and decreased precipitation with intense flash rain events. Increase desertification is expected especially in the Mediterranean Basin, where in summer, radiation and temperature are high and water is scarce. Therefore, while vascular plants increase water consumption in green roofs during warmer periods, mosses present themselves as potential candidates due to their poikilohydric nature, responding to the environmental availability of water, completely drying out and recovering upon rehydration. Although criteria for the selection of vascular plants adapted to the Mediterranean and suitable for green roofs have been developed, no information is available regarding the selection of mosses based on scientific criteria. Here we propose selection criteria for moss species based on ecological preferences according to Ellenberg’s values and help to define moss traits suitable for a nonirrigated, nature-based green roof that tolerates the Mediterranean climate. The main result is a table of potential candidate mosses that can be either used as standalone or in conjunction with vascular plants to decrease water usage and/or manage stormwater through an easily applicable selection methodology. For green roof practitioners, we proposed that acrocarpous mosses exhibiting turf/cushion life forms and colonist or perennial life strategies best fit the requirements for such a green infrastructure in extreme climate regions with scarce water resources. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Designing a Model to Display the Relation between Social Vulnerability and Anthropogenic Risk of Wildfires in Galicia, Spain
Urban Sci. 2019, 3(1), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci3010032
Received: 14 January 2019 / Revised: 22 February 2019 / Accepted: 6 March 2019 / Published: 12 March 2019
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Abstract
Since the beginning of the 21st century, most of the forest fires that have occured in Spain have taken place in the northern region of Galicia. This area represents 5.8% of the Spanish territory, but compromises, in certain years, up to 50% of [...] Read more.
Since the beginning of the 21st century, most of the forest fires that have occured in Spain have taken place in the northern region of Galicia. This area represents 5.8% of the Spanish territory, but compromises, in certain years, up to 50% of the total number of wildfires. Current research on forest fires is focused mostly on physical or meteorological characteristics, post-fire situations, and their potential destructive capacities (main areas burnt, type of vegetation, economic loses, etc.). However, the academic research to date has not delved into other socioeconomic factors (population structure, density, livestock farms, education, among others), which compromise the existing pre-fire situation in the affected territories, and subsequently reflect the prevailing vulnerability of the population. Indeed, these socioeconomic variables can influence fire occurrence, whether positively or negatively. To fill in this knowledge gap, this article analyzes the relationship between wildfire events and the socioeconomic variables that characterize the Galician municipalities affected. To that effect, first, a thorough examination and selection of the most relevant socioeconomic variables, and their subsequent justification will be carried out. Then, using IBM SPSS statistics 24, a linear regression is executed using the data of wildfires that occurred in Galicia between 2001–2015. The resulting model allows a better knowledge of the importance of the socioeconomic situation in Galician municipalities when wildfires occur. Therefore, this result identifies the existing relationship between the socioeconomic variables and wildfire events, and consequently will help to optimize the interventions that must be done. This may be the best way to carry out prevention actions in order to reduce vulnerability to forest fires. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Gender Mainstreaming in Waste Education Programs: A Conceptual Framework
Urban Sci. 2019, 3(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci3010029
Received: 11 January 2019 / Revised: 19 February 2019 / Accepted: 1 March 2019 / Published: 5 March 2019
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Abstract
Gender issues are present in waste management, from daily handling activities through to decision-making processes. In waste education programs, the disregard for views of and contribution by women has resulted in strategies that do not comprehensively address the waste issue, preventing long-standing and [...] Read more.
Gender issues are present in waste management, from daily handling activities through to decision-making processes. In waste education programs, the disregard for views of and contribution by women has resulted in strategies that do not comprehensively address the waste issue, preventing long-standing and sustainable outcomes, while increasing existing gender inequities. Three critical waste matters on education and gender were identified: (1) lack of meaningful involvement and participation of women (and other vulnerable groups) throughout the decision-making processes; (2) lack of inclusion of gender-specific designs and gender-sensitive approaches in the information and education materials; and (3) tendency to devise strategies directed to women only, while exempting the other stakeholders from their responsibilities. This paper presents a closer look into the relationship between waste education and gender, with a proposal of a participatory framework for gender mainstreaming in waste education programs. It includes components to assess the promoting entity of the waste education program and all stages of the program. The framework represents a novel theory and practice contribution for waste education development, to support academics, practitioners, and policymakers, in the quest of achieving equitable and sustainable waste management systems for all. Full article
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