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Open AccessArticle

Territorial Effects of Shared-Living Heritage Regeneration

1
Environmental Futures Lab., College of Design and Innovation, Tongji University, n. 281 Fuxin Road, Yangpu District, Shanghai 200092, China
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China Lab. for Architecture and Urban Studies, Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia, Italy
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Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Arquitectura, Arte y Diseño Av. H. Colegio Militar 4700, Nombre de Dios, Chihuahua 31300, Mexico
4
Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Arquitectura, Arte y Diseño Av. Eugenio Garza Sada S/N, Predio Cerro Gordo, León 37190, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8616; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208616
Received: 30 June 2020 / Revised: 12 October 2020 / Accepted: 14 October 2020 / Published: 17 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Geography)
The paper presents further steps of study started by authors in recent years, as part of the widest international research collaboration, which focuses on shared life and regeneration of abandonment of rural settlements as strategies for the development of sustainable territories. This research aims to understand how the regeneration of ancient community buildings impacts on the sustainable development of the local context. To understand these effects, the research considered four traditional typologies of community buildings, from different cultures: Tulou (China), Cascina (Italy), Hacienda (Mexico), and Marae (New Zealand). Among the tens/hundreds of contemporary regeneration interventions, three contemporary projects per each of these typologies have been selected. To assess the territorial impact of the projects a new approach has been defined using Expert Interviews as the methodology, so as to be able to have an assessment directly by experts in the fields of regenerative projects and sustainable development. The Expert Interviews were held based on a questionnaire that assessed the effects of the projects. For the evaluation of the projects, two categories of indicators have been selected: (1) United Nations SDGs, (2) architectural regeneration indicators generated by the study “The Role of Cultural Heritage in Sustainable Development: Multidimensional Indicators as Decision-Making Tool”, by Francesca Nocca, published in Sustainability (2017, 9, 1882). The research outputs show how the urban-architectural regeneration of these historical typologies can be clearly associated with indications of sustainable development. The results also show that in all four cultures the regeneration of historic buildings provides many benefits to local communities by successfully mixing different income groups and the inclusion of marginalized or vulnerable groups. View Full-Text
Keywords: shared heritage; architectural design; heritage regeneration; community buildings; expert interview method; sustainable development goals (SDGs); cultural landscape; territorial impacts and sustainability; rural-urban shared heritage; architectural design; heritage regeneration; community buildings; expert interview method; sustainable development goals (SDGs); cultural landscape; territorial impacts and sustainability; rural-urban
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cattaneo, T.; Giorgi, E.; Flores, M.; Barquero, V. Territorial Effects of Shared-Living Heritage Regeneration. Sustainability 2020, 12, 8616.

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