sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 17709

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Architecture Cracow, University of Technology, Warszawska 24, 31-155 Kraków, Poland
Interests: spatial analysis; urban planning; city planning; landscape architecture; protection heritage; landscape planning; landscaping; landscape; cultural landscapes; landscape design; landscape urbanism; landscape aesthetics; urbanism; heritage conservation; landscape history
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Architecture Cracow, University of Technology, Warszawska 24, 31-155 Kraków, Poland
Interests: landscape architecture; landscape planning; historic landscape research; heritage protection; urban renewal; urban planning; public participation; participatory design; cultural landscapes; landscape design; landscape urbanism; landscape aesthetics; heritage conservation; landscape history; therapeutic landscapes; historic gardens

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Garden Art and Landscape Design, Institute of Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Garden Art, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Budapest, Hungary
Interests: landscape planning; urban planning; urban ecology; landscape architecture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue serves as a platform to discuss the phenomenon of cultural landscape resilience and the external pressures connected, among other issues, to climate change. The most pertinent questions to be addressed are as follows: To what extent are the values of cultural landscape able to spontaneously determine its resilience to contemporary transformations? Is landscape resilience possible at all? If so, to what extent and with what tools can it be strengthened? The subject of resilience may refer to various aspects of cultural heritage conservation—environmental aspects such as climate change challenges, as well as legal and spatial/urban planning aspects. The participants of the 29th international scientific conference on the art of gardening and historical dendrology, entitled “Resilient cultural landscape - methods, applications and patterns”, which took place online on 4 November 2022, are particularly encouraged to contribute research to this Special Issue. The topics considered include, but are not restricted to, reflections on the identification of current problems, and challenges in maintaining and preserving the cultural heritage of cities, villages, open spaces and, in particular, historic gardens. It is also important to pay attention to the integrity of the cultural landscape with the continuation of the activity of its anthropogenic determinant, local biodiversity and environmental conditions. These considerations should respond to the appeal of the International Federation of Landscape Architects Europe Resolution Granada, Spain (October 2021), among others, referring to sustainable landscapes. Activities, methods and patterns should be based on promoting the creation of self-sustaining ecosystems used to meet human needs. The main objectives of this Special Issue are the international exchange of research sharing experiences on how to increase the resilience of cultural heritage and the establishment of interdisciplinary cooperation.

Dr. Katarzyna Hodor
Dr. Anna Staniewska
Dr. Albert Fekete
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • resilient heritage landscapes
  • landscape resilience
  • historic gardens and parks
  • impact of historical conditions on the modern city
  • biodiversity and authenticity in historic landscapes
  • choice of planting to create resilient landscapes
  • climate change adaptation of historic sites and landscapes
  • historic urban landscapes
  • urban vegetation history
  • urbanscape
  • urban ecology and ecosystems
  • structures of cultural heritage
  • conservation activities in urban and suburban zones
  • urban–suburban relations, regionalism, and biodiversity
  • spatial and urban planning of heritage landscapes and its relation to climate and heritage nexus

Published Papers (12 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

19 pages, 19220 KiB  
Article
The Importance of Resilient, Health-Promoting, and Accessible Cultural Landscapes Using the Example of One Suburb of Gdańsk, Poland
by Monika Trojanowska
Sustainability 2024, 16(9), 3652; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16093652 - 26 Apr 2024
Viewed by 485
Abstract
The urban green public spaces “UGSs” provide a place for everyday contact with nature to humans. Green and blue infrastructure is important for urban heat mitigation. This study focuses on the relationship between satisfaction with the place of living and quality of life [...] Read more.
The urban green public spaces “UGSs” provide a place for everyday contact with nature to humans. Green and blue infrastructure is important for urban heat mitigation. This study focuses on the relationship between satisfaction with the place of living and quality of life indexes, accessibility, and the quality of public green spaces in one of the suburbs of Gdańsk in Poland. Even though there are award-winning public parks and a large-scale Tri-city Landscape Park, the individual indexes measuring the satisfaction of local inhabitants with accessibility to public parks and their quality were well beyond the average in Gdańsk. The research question was to explain such low satisfaction with green public parks and spaces in Gdańsk-Osowa. The results of the evaluation of available “UGSs” against the universal standard for health-promoting urban places confirmed their recreational value but also demonstrated limited spatial and physical accessibility and possible overcrowding. Thus, the possibilities for everyday contact with nature for numerous inhabitants are limited and that condition may influence the life quality indexes. The results suggest that increasing urban density and the further development of residential neighborhoods requires careful planning of new public parks in consideration of proximity to public open green spaces. The accessibility of public parks within walking distance is crucial when planning new developments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 6356 KiB  
Article
Manor and Park Estates—Resilience to Transformation and the New Management of Space Due to Political Changes: The Case of Western Pomerania (Poland)
by Magdalena Rzeszotarska-Pałka
Sustainability 2024, 16(6), 2562; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16062562 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 539
Abstract
The historical landscape reveals diverse social, economic, political transformations that create an identity of place, one which should be protected for future generations. Manor and park estates have been and continue to be valuable parts of cultural heritage and a distinguishing feature of [...] Read more.
The historical landscape reveals diverse social, economic, political transformations that create an identity of place, one which should be protected for future generations. Manor and park estates have been and continue to be valuable parts of cultural heritage and a distinguishing feature of the rural landscape in Europe. Since 1945, however, they have often failed to resist negative changes, especially in Eastern Europe where, after the Second World War, countries adopted the socialist system, which abolished private property and placed many historical buildings under the management of state institutions for several decades. In this context, it is important to study their current state of preservation. This study analyzes the condition of manor and park estates in Western Pomerania, Poland, that became the property of State Agricultural Farms (PGRs) after the Second World War. For this purpose, it was necessary to determine the extent of their transformation brought about by the State Agricultural Farms from 1949–1991, as well as changes that have occurred in the past 30 years. A qualitative method was used to assess the preservation of historical manor and park estates and to classify them according to their degree of preservation. The results showed that 42% of the estates surveyed have had their original form and spatial composition transformed, and their preservation status is assessed as moderate. Nearly 30% are in poor condition, which is hindering their full revitalization and the restoration of cultural and natural values. Only 28% of manor and park estates are maintained in a very good state. It is a matter of concern that the decline of these estates has been continuous and that restoration efforts have been limited. However, by assessing the current state of preservation, we can identify the measures necessary to stop further deterioration and preserve the cultural heritage of the region. It is clear that the preservation of these estates is essential to maintaining the identity of Western Pomerania. Manor and park estates are historical monuments associated with the people who once lived there. They must be protected to promote sustainable development and preserve a common European cultural heritage for future generations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 6300 KiB  
Article
Solar Landscapes: A Methodology for the Adaptive Integration of Renewable Energy Production into Cultural Landscapes
by Chrili Car, Erwin Frohmann and Dagmar Grimm-Pretner
Sustainability 2024, 16(5), 2216; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16052216 - 6 Mar 2024
Viewed by 834
Abstract
The increasing use of solar energy is an integral step toward carbon neutrality. At the same time, outdoor solar farms are significantly altering existing cultural landscapes. This work examines the possibilities of integrating the use of solar energy into these landscapes in such [...] Read more.
The increasing use of solar energy is an integral step toward carbon neutrality. At the same time, outdoor solar farms are significantly altering existing cultural landscapes. This work examines the possibilities of integrating the use of solar energy into these landscapes in such a way that the unique, regional character of places is preserved and enhanced. The research project that was carried out developed a conceptual design approach that takes as its starting point landscape architectural and aesthetic analyses of existing sites in Styria, Austria, the spatial characteristics of the cultural landscapes in which they are embedded, and their suitability for generating solar energy. The comparison of a site’s characteristics with the technical possibilities evaluated from a literature review enables a responsive design practice using solar modules. The result is a method of landscape architectural design that integrates solar energy on the basis of an adaptive site-specific approach as well as a catalogue of sample cases that illustrate how designing with solar modules can honor and add value to existing places while enhancing their ecological, economic, and social functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 8101 KiB  
Article
What Is a Resilient Smart City? Blue–Green Infrastructure as a Strategic Feature of Smart Urban Form: Empirical Evidence with a Particular Focus on the Songdo IBD and Aspern Seestadt in Vienna
by Natalia K. Gorgol
Sustainability 2024, 16(5), 1758; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16051758 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 889
Abstract
This study concerns the correlation of a smart city as an idea with urban form, with a particular focus on blue–green infrastructure. It aims to bridge the research gap on the physical structure of a smart city. It attempts to answer the following [...] Read more.
This study concerns the correlation of a smart city as an idea with urban form, with a particular focus on blue–green infrastructure. It aims to bridge the research gap on the physical structure of a smart city. It attempts to answer the following questions: (1) are there any patterns or rules in how a smart city’s urbanscape should be shaped? (2) Can green and recreational spaces contribute to a smart city’s smartness? If so, can a smart city be more resilient? To answer these questions, the author proposes the framework of a ‘smart urban form’ and a five-goal checklist to evaluate the blue–green infrastructure of a smart city. This checklist tool is based on the following five goals: morphology, ecology and environmental protection, accessibility, multifunctionality and activities, and identity and aesthetics, with specific factors for each goal. The paper presents a test of the tool on two existing smart city urban structures: the Songdo IBD, South Korea, and Aspern Seestadt, Vienna, Austria. This research is based on a combination of mixed methods: analysis of the literature, a multiple-case study, and observation. A correlation between the resilience of a smart city and its urban form, with an emphasis on blue–green infrastructure, was found. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 3117 KiB  
Article
Safety in Public Open Green Spaces in Fortaleza, Brazil: A Data Analysis
by Bárbara Mylena Delgado da Silva, Eszter Karlócainé Bakay and Mariana Batista de Morais
Sustainability 2024, 16(2), 539; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16020539 - 8 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 809
Abstract
Latin America is as heterogeneous as its cities. To understand Latin American cities, it is necessary to have a clear vision of how they are organized, not only physically but according to their social, cultural, and economic contexts (which are associated). Historically, it [...] Read more.
Latin America is as heterogeneous as its cities. To understand Latin American cities, it is necessary to have a clear vision of how they are organized, not only physically but according to their social, cultural, and economic contexts (which are associated). Historically, it has suffered a lot in terms of politics and the security of its cities. Insecurity reflects a structural problem; economic and social inequality are the main actors of spatial segregation, motivating violence and, consequently, the insecurity of urban space. Fortaleza is one of the largest Brazilian cities, and it is possible to fit it into this reality. Many public actions may benefit only one sector of society, showing biased investments and, again, confirming the tremendous economic and social differences in Latin American cities. In this study, questionnaires related to attendance, feelings, maintenance, and safety were made to some of Fortaleza’s residents regarding an urban park called Parque do Cocó, one of the biggest in Latin America. Due to its large area, it is located in different city neighborhoods, allowing for us to see the differences in treatments throughout its extension. This article aims to understand how the public opinions and mentality of a portion of the population are characterized concerning safety in green public spaces in the city. In addition, the insecurity of public green spaces can also be inserted into a problem of environmental injustice in the urban context. This study of Fortaleza’s Cocó Park highlights significant disparities in safety perceptions and maintenance across socioeconomic regions. Findings indicate that areas with higher human development index (HDI) scores experience better park conditions. The research underscores the necessity for comprehensive urban policies that address socioeconomic inequalities, as evidenced by the correlation between crime rates and HDI. Cocó Park emerges as a key factor in sustainable urban development, aligning with Fortaleza’s urban planning goals. The study emphasizes the critical role of urban green spaces in enhancing the quality of life and fostering social cohesion in urban landscapes. Moreover, with the data collected, it will be possible to stress further how urban adequacy relates to social situations in Latin American cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 3971 KiB  
Article
The Potential Impact of Changes in Soil and Climate Conditions on Development of the Herb Layer Vegetation of Public Parks in Krakow (Southern Poland)
by Łukasz Moszkowicz, Izabela Krzeptowska-Moszkowicz, Karolina Porada and Miłosz Zieliński
Sustainability 2024, 16(1), 451; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16010451 - 4 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1288
Abstract
Today, urban greenery is at the center of attention, especially in the context of climate change. Shaped in large part by natural factors, the herb layer of public parks is a part of urban greenery that is the most sensitive to climate and [...] Read more.
Today, urban greenery is at the center of attention, especially in the context of climate change. Shaped in large part by natural factors, the herb layer of public parks is a part of urban greenery that is the most sensitive to climate and soil condition changes. In this paper, we present a study intended to answer how resilient is the species composition and herb layer structure against the soil and climate condition changes in parks. To this end, we analyzed Ellenberg and Zarzycki’s ecological index numbers for species recorded in different groups in terms of historical-geographical, life forms, prevalence within the flora of Poland, and relationships with different vegetation types (phytoassociation classes) in comparison to the conditions present in parks. It was found that a large part of various species groups showed an optima and ecological tolerance spectra that went beyond the park conditions, indicating that at least some park vegetation can be expected to show resilience to changing conditions. However, changes in temperature and humidity will alter the composition and structure of the park herb layer. The direction of changes in climate and soil conditions can be decisive for herb layer transformation directions. With rising temperatures, humidity can be crucial. Poor soil moisture conditions will promote an increased share of foreign, synanthropic species, while local natural and semi-natural species will disappear. When climate change that leads to a decrease in temperatures is concerned, it is temperature and not humidity that will be the key factor in the transformation of park herb layer species compositions. The herb layer of Krakow’s parks will have the least resilience to changes in conditions within local non-synanthropic species, rare species and geophytes and to some extent also forest and meadow species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 18203 KiB  
Article
Fostering Urban Cohesion: Exploring Morphological Adaptations in Budapest’s IX District through a Typological Survey
by Gabriel Silva Dantas, Ildikó Réka Nagy and Anna Andrea Szövényi
Sustainability 2023, 15(24), 16903; https://doi.org/10.3390/su152416903 - 16 Dec 2023
Viewed by 849
Abstract
In response to the imperative to enhance urban structures for global sustainability and improved quality of life, the European Union has diligently established parameters and policies fostering urban cohesion and territorial integration. Embracing the guidelines conceived by the European Commission, this research presents [...] Read more.
In response to the imperative to enhance urban structures for global sustainability and improved quality of life, the European Union has diligently established parameters and policies fostering urban cohesion and territorial integration. Embracing the guidelines conceived by the European Commission, this research presents a case study examining morphological conditions in the IX District of Budapest, Hungary—a strategically chosen area undergoing renovation. The primary goals of the intervention are to address social and spatial segregation, enhance urban performance, and promote global resilience. Employing a Typological Survey methodology, an in-depth assessment was conducted and translated into a Geographic Information System (GIS) database. Consequently, the morphological analysis successfully identified five distinct types of elements composing the urban structure of the studied area. This analysis revealed a highly heterogeneous constitution characterized by dynamic and continuous changes, reflecting the evolving nature of the urban landscape. Findings indicate noteworthy improvements in the performance and quality of public spaces while preserving the historical morphological characteristics that have long defined this area and its urban landscape. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 17975 KiB  
Article
What Affects the Depth of the Human–Garden Relationship in Freely Accessible Urban Sensory Gardens with Therapeutic Features in Various Users?
by Izabela Krzeptowska-Moszkowicz, Łukasz Moszkowicz and Karolina Porada
Sustainability 2023, 15(19), 14420; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151914420 - 1 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1423
Abstract
A human being comes into contact with the environment through the senses. That is why in the space of cities, where various intense stimuli negatively affect the living of people, there is important greenery that has a positive impact. Significant types of gardens [...] Read more.
A human being comes into contact with the environment through the senses. That is why in the space of cities, where various intense stimuli negatively affect the living of people, there is important greenery that has a positive impact. Significant types of gardens within urban green areas are sensory gardens. In our article, we intended to answer the question of what specifically affects the formation of deeper human–garden relations in urban, publicly accessible gardens designed to have a sensory impact. Our research was conducted mainly in Poland. We used a method of assessing the behavior of garden visitors, using a five-point scale. We found that the existence of specific interiors in gardens that have been designed in such a way as to stimulate two to three selected senses, which we call the leading senses, can create an environment that allows for deeper relationships with the garden. We also concluded that when designing a public sensory garden, adaptation to specific user groups is one of the most important guidelines. A deeper contact with the sensory garden for people visiting a city, e.g., tourists, may occur especially when there is a positive surprise or when an additional need of this group is met in the garden. Sensory gardens, although they are a relatively new type of urban greenery, can become a permanent element of cities if they are carefully designed and meet the expectations of their recipients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

30 pages, 22158 KiB  
Article
Study of Centrality Measures in the Network of Green Spaces in the City of Krakow
by Karolina Dudzic-Gyurkovich
Sustainability 2023, 15(18), 13458; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151813458 - 8 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1074
Abstract
Access to and interaction with natural blue or green spaces is a critical factor in quality of life and overall well-being. Studies have shown that exposure to natural areas has health benefits for individuals and society. Incorporating interconnected natural ecosystems into the urban [...] Read more.
Access to and interaction with natural blue or green spaces is a critical factor in quality of life and overall well-being. Studies have shown that exposure to natural areas has health benefits for individuals and society. Incorporating interconnected natural ecosystems into the urban fabric is recognized as a means of building urban resilience and mitigating climate change. It is therefore essential to strengthen and expand existing networks. Mathematical measures of centrality provide a valuable approach to analyzing networks, based on the assumption that certain nodes are more central due to better connectivity. However, due to their complexity, centrality measures are not widely used in urban planning studies, and no research has been conducted in specific Polish conditions. This study aims to fill this gap by testing the usefulness of centrality measures in Krakow’s system of green spaces. The results show that there are few well-connected green areas and that the centrality measures vary. The information provided by this study can contribute to a better understanding of the spatial distribution of green spaces in Krakow and in future to better management and decision-making processes aimed at improving the accessibility of green spaces and the quality of life of residents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 24539 KiB  
Article
Spatial, Functional, and Landscape Changes in a Medium-Sized Post-Industrial City Based on Aerial Photo Analysis: The Case of Gorlice (Poland)
by Dorota Wantuch-Matla, Sławomir Dorocki and Rafał Kroczak
Sustainability 2023, 15(15), 11821; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151511821 - 1 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1289
Abstract
The article presents the spatial-functional transformations of a medium-sized post-industrial city in the context of the decline in the industrial function which used to occupy a prominent position in the city. The research attempts to answer the following questions: (1) What has been [...] Read more.
The article presents the spatial-functional transformations of a medium-sized post-industrial city in the context of the decline in the industrial function which used to occupy a prominent position in the city. The research attempts to answer the following questions: (1) What has been reflected in the spatial and functional development of the city and its landscape by the dynamic transformations in the industrial sector that have taken place since the 1970s, playing out in the broad context of the specific political and socio-economic conditions? and (2) how is the city dealing with post-industrial sites—are we dealing with a ‘post-industrial scar’ or a process of their adaptation to the needs of the present? Analyses were initiated to identify differences in spatial and landscape structure from 1966 to the present. To this end, a land cover analysis was carried out based on available sets of aerial photographs taken in four selected years within the study period, as well as a calculation of the index of variation. Graphical and GIS software (QGIS 3.28.4 version) and methods of statistical data analysis were used. To come up with a full picture of transformations in the second half of the 20th century, an outline of the historical spatial development of Gorlice and the local oil and engineering industry was presented. The results of the research confirm the relationship between the functional and spatial development of the city and the transformation and condition of its industrial function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

32 pages, 11122 KiB  
Article
Framework for the Design of a Small Transport Hub as an Interdisciplinary Challenge to Implement Sustainable Solutions
by Anna Staniewska, Izabela Sykta, Agnieszka Ozimek, Krzysztof Barnaś, Mariusz Dudek, Magdalena Marasik and Kinga Racoń-Leja
Sustainability 2023, 15(14), 10975; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151410975 - 13 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1749
Abstract
The numerous effects of climate change on the urban environment over the past decades have urged many planning professionals to implement the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Higher education institutions (HEIs) bear particular responsibility for sustainability-aware designers able to implement specific measures [...] Read more.
The numerous effects of climate change on the urban environment over the past decades have urged many planning professionals to implement the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Higher education institutions (HEIs) bear particular responsibility for sustainability-aware designers able to implement specific measures in this field. This paper presents a typology of design solutions for urban contexts intended to implement Sustainable Development Goal 11, which refers to making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable, which can be included in university curricula. The study presents a comprehensive source base of possible interpretations of sustainability guidelines in architectural, landscape, and transport solution design and can be used to guide and assess projects in these fields. Solutions identified and analyzed were grouped into four dimensions related to sustainability aspects (accessibility, ecology, functionality, and identity). The framework proposed was developed based on the teaching experience of thesis design projects and practice-based workshop course projects featured in the curricula of first and second cycle Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Transport programs taught at the Cracow University of Technology, Poland. The projects were prepared as a part of workshop-based public consultations for a real-world project—the construction of a transport hub in Hrubieszów, Poland. The most complex implementation of various individual sustainable design solutions was linked to the interdisciplinarity of the design team and the broadest public participation spectrum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 14776 KiB  
Article
The Pocket Park and Its Impact on the Quality of Urban Space on the Local and Supralocal Scale—Case Study of Krakow, Poland
by Tomasz Bajwoluk and Piotr Langer
Sustainability 2023, 15(6), 5153; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065153 - 14 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3519
Abstract
The idea of building pocket parks in cities is one of the more rational proposals for utilizing cameral spaces to create new quality in terms of green areas while accounting for the potential to blend them into the compact functiospatial structure of the [...] Read more.
The idea of building pocket parks in cities is one of the more rational proposals for utilizing cameral spaces to create new quality in terms of green areas while accounting for the potential to blend them into the compact functiospatial structure of the contemporary city. Numerous examples of pocket park projects from around the world point to there being considerable interest in this form of greenery. The goal of this paper is to present the findings of a study of a selected number of pocket parks in Krakow, Poland, in terms of their accessibility, local determinants, and the nearby functiospatial structure, as well as whether they can be included into a wider network of service and green spaces of supralocal significance. The research method included novel field research of selected pocket parks and their surroundings. The form and function of the parks were analyzed and the type of their surrounding urban structure was determined, along with the parks’ accessibility. The study investigated nine parks located in the northeastern part of Krakow in a dense development structure dominated by multi-family housing. Analyses of the parks themselves and the research on the relations and linkages between parks and their surrounding urban structure generally pointed to the accuracy of the concept of the pocket park, its universality, and its compliance with the concept of the sustainable development of urban space. The presence and manner of development of pocket parks can be said to enhance the quality of spaces in confined fragments of an urban structure and to have predominantly local significance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Cultural Landscapes—Methods, Applications and Patterns)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop