Special Issue "Biodiversity 2020: Agriculture, Environment and Wellbeing"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Pietro Santamaria
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Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture and Environmental Science, Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy
Interests: agrobiodiversity; vegetable production; greenhouse production; plant nutrition; soilless culture; vegetable quality; nitrate
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Prof. Conversa Giulia
Website
Guest Editor
Department of the Science of Agriculture, Food and Environment (SAFE), Università degli studi di Foggia , Gramsci 89/91, Italy
Interests: agriculture; soil fertility; plant nutrition; crop production; crop management; soil analysis; nutrient management; crop science; biofertilizers; field experimentation
Prof. Elia Antonio
Website
Guest Editor
Department of the Science of Agriculture, Food and Environment (SAFE), Università degli studi di Foggia , Gramsci 89/91, Italy
Interests: horticulture and floriculture
Dr. Massimiliano Renna
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Guest Editor
Institute of Food Production Sciences, Italian National Research Council (CNR) Bari, Italy
Interests: food processing; antioxidant activity; gastronomy; phenol; food processing and engineering; food science; nutrition; food; antioxidants; food chemistry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue includes a selection of papers that will be presented at the XIII National Conference on Biodiversity "Biodiversity 2020", that will be held from 8 to 11 September 2020 in Foggia (Italy).  (https://sites.google.com/unifg.it/biodiversity2020). The event, organized by the Department of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences (SAFE) of the University of Foggia, represents an important appointment for scientific debate among researchers, experts of national and international organizations and technicians of public administrations on the protection and valorization of biodiversity.

The conference program is based on various aspects of scientific research and policies, related to plant, animal, and microbial biological diversity for food and agriculture, as well as to natural ecosystems.

The main objectives of the conference are (1) to examine the urgent issues of biodiversity protection in a scenario of climate change and food insecurity; (2) to disseminate current knowledge in the identification, application, and development of strategies aimed at promoting the diversification in natural and anthropized systems, cultural, and food diversity; (3) to increase knowledge on the function, distribution, and abundance of biodiversity, to communicate scientific knowledge on biodiversity.

Prof. Pietro Santamaria
Prof. Conversa Giulia
Prof. Elia Antonio
Dr. Massimiliano Renna
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biodiversity of terrestrial and aquatic agrosystems and ecosystems
  • Genomic evaluation of biodiversity
  • Biodiversity monitoring and conservation
  • Biodiversity and water systems regulation and quality
  • Pollination
  • Biodiversity and crop protection from pests/pathogens/weeds
  • Breeding and product quality of animal biodiversity
  • Biodiversity and regulation of natural events
  • Biodiversity, air quality, and climate mitigation
  • Biodiversity, climate change, and alien species
  • Biodiversity management on a territorial scale
  • Biodiversity, territory, and landscape
  • Biodiversity and historical rural landscapes
  • Biodiversity and agroforestry
  • Biodiversity in agrosilvopastoral systems
  • Biodiversity in urban, peri-urban, fringe areas
  • Biodiversity landscape enjoyment
  • Biodiversity and recovery of abandoned and marginal areas
  • Species/habitat conservation and regeneration of compromised environments
  • Biodiversity, ethnobotany, and traditional cultures and knowledge
  • Biodiversity, human wellbeing, and health
  • Biodiversity and human nutrition
  • Biodiversity and diversification of the diet
  • Wild plants properties and medicinal herbs
  • Value of biodiversity and of ecosystem services, economic and social impact
  • Policies on biodiversity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Crop Pollination in Small-Scale Agriculture in Tanzania: Household Dependence, Awareness and Conservation
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2228; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062228 - 12 Mar 2020
Abstract
Global economic value of agriculture production resulting from animal pollination services has been estimated to be $235–$577 billion. This estimate is based on quantification of crops that are available at the global markets, and mainly originates from countries with precise information about quantities [...] Read more.
Global economic value of agriculture production resulting from animal pollination services has been estimated to be $235–$577 billion. This estimate is based on quantification of crops that are available at the global markets, and mainly originates from countries with precise information about quantities of agriculture production, exports, and imports. In contrast, knowledge about the contribution of pollinators to household food and income in small-scale farming at local and regional scales is still lacking, especially for developing countries where the availability of agricultural statistics is limited. Although the global decline in pollinator diversity and abundance has received much attention, relatively little effort has been directed towards understanding the role of pollinators in small-scale farming systems, which feed a substantial part of the world’s population. Here, we have assessed how local farmers in northern Tanzania depend on insect-pollinated crops for household food and income, and to what extent farmers are aware of the importance of insect pollinators and how they can conserve them. Our results show that local farmers in northern Tanzania derived their food and income from a wide range of crop plants, and that 67% of these crops depend on animal pollination to a moderate to essential degree. We also found that watermelon—for which pollination by insects is essential for yield—on average contributed nearly 25% of household income, and that watermelons were grown by 63% of the farmers. Our findings indicate that local farmers can increase their yields from animal pollinated crops by adopting more pollinator-friendly farming practices. Yet, we found that local farmers’ awareness of pollinators, and the ecosystem service they provide, was extremely low, and intentional actions to conserve or manage them were generally lacking. We therefore urge agriculture authorities in Tanzania to act to ensure that local farmers become aware of insect pollinators and their important role in agriculture production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity 2020: Agriculture, Environment and Wellbeing)
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Open AccessReview
Can Constructed Wetlands be Wildlife Refuges? A Review of Their Potential Biodiversity Conservation Value
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1442; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041442 - 15 Feb 2020
Abstract
The degradation of wetland ecosystems is currently recognized as one of the main threats to global biodiversity. As a means of compensation, constructed wetlands (CWs), which are built to treat agricultural runoff and municipal wastewater, have become important for maintaining biodiversity. Here, we [...] Read more.
The degradation of wetland ecosystems is currently recognized as one of the main threats to global biodiversity. As a means of compensation, constructed wetlands (CWs), which are built to treat agricultural runoff and municipal wastewater, have become important for maintaining biodiversity. Here, we review studies on the relationships between CWs and their associated biodiversity published over the past three decades. In doing so, we provide an overview of how wildlife utilizes CWs, and the effects of biodiversity on pollutant transformation and removal. Beyond their primary aim (to purify various kinds of wastewater), CWs provide sub-optimal habitat for many species and, in turn, their purification function can be strongly influenced by the biodiversity that they support. However, there are some difficulties when using CWs to conserve biodiversity because some key characteristics of these engineered ecosystems vary from natural wetlands, including some fundamental ecological processes. Without proper management intervention, these features of CWs can promote biological invasion, as well as form an ‘ecological trap’ for native species. Management options, such as basin-wide integrative management and building in more natural wetland components, can partially offset these adverse impacts. Overall, the awareness of managers and the public regarding the potential value of CWs in biodiversity conservation remains superficial. More in-depth research, especially on how to balance different stakeholder values between wastewater managers and conservationists, is now required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity 2020: Agriculture, Environment and Wellbeing)
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