Special Issue "Sustainability of Automated and Connected Transport - The User Perspective"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yoram Shiftan
Website
Guest Editor
Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, Haifa, 32000, Israel
Interests: travel behaviour; transport policy; transport economics; sustainability; automated and connected cars
Prof. Dr. Amalia Polydoropoulou
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Shipping Trade & Transport, University of the Aegean, Chios, 72100, Greece
Interests: demand modelling; advanced research methods and tools; business models; mobility-as-a-service; last-mile deliveries automated and connected transport
Dr. Nikolas Thomopoulos
Website
Guest Editor
WISE-ACT Chair, Department of Tourism and Transport, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH, UK
Interests: wider impact of autonomous and connected transport
Dr. Valentina Rappazzo
Website
Guest Editor
Politecnico di Torino - Interuniversity Department of Regional and Urban Studies and Planning (DIST), Viale Mattioli, 39 – 10125, Torino, Italy
Interests: transport externalities; transport policy; sustainability; travel behaviour; automated and connected vehicles/cars

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Automated and connected transport (ACT) offers increased opportunities to support new transportation services whilst having the potential to make transport more sustainable. Car sharing, ride hailing, and other emerging transport services are expected to support the mobility as a service (MaaS) concept and practice, as well as relevant business models, promoting improved public transport and innovative last mile solutions. By focusing on road transport and primarily on cars, this Special Issue aims at contributing in this developing debate among scholars and practitioners. However, research to date has largely focused on the vehicle aspect of this innovation as well as on policy requirements during the last few years. Yet, a core component of this debate missing to date is the user perspective and behaviour, which can have a significant effect on their impact on sustainability.

Therefore, this Special Issue seeks to understand the potential impact of ACT on user mobility, and in turn on sustainability overall. If all transport users use innovative shared mobility services, then car ownership levels would be reduced, making an important contribution in meeting global sustainability objectives. Equally, if ACT led to increased individual car use and ownership levels due to potential benefits, such as reduced parking needs and ease of travel, then transport networks would come into a complete gridlock as some recent studies have already shown, increasing congestion in cities with a wide use of ride-hailing services. Eventually, the latter would have a seriously negative impact on sustainability.

Papers in this Special Issue are invited by experts from any sustainability-related discipline to address the wider impacts of ACT based on empirical evidence and surveys of user preferences and acceptance levels. Survey data could be attitudinal data, revealed preference data or stated preference data based on future scenarios. All papers should also make explicit links with socioeconomic, business or policy implications of sustainable deployment of ACT. Large-scale surveys, surveys using innovative data collection or presentation methods, and cross-country comparisons are particularly welcome. The dissemination of research results, tests, developments, and applications will be crucial to steer the governance concerning the spread of ACT, with the aim to effectively and truly contribute to a more sustainable transport.

Indicative topics of this Special Issue could be:

  • Identifying the key behavioural, economic, social, demographic or cultural factors determining the attitude of transport users towards ACT;
  • Analysing the behaviour of ACT users by comparing their choices through revealed or stated preference experiments;
  • Reviewing and evaluating the value of travel time for ACT;
  • Evaluating socioeconomic challenges of ACT, e.g., equity, privacy, security;
  • Adjusting survey methods and suggest innovative data collection methodologies for ACT.

Prof. Dr. Yoram Shiftan
Prof. Dr. Amalia Polydoropoulou
Dr. Nikolas Thomopoulos
Dr. Valentina Rappazzo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Automated and connected transport
  • Autonomous vehicles
  • Automated vehicles
  • Automated cars
  • Shared transport
  • Emerging transportation services
  • Travel behaviour
  • Travel time budget
  • Value of time
  • User acceptance
  • Survey
  • AV
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Connected Vehicle Technology for Improved Multimodal Winter Travel: Agency Perspective and a Conceptual Exploration
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 5071; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12125071 - 22 Jun 2020
Abstract
Accurate and real-time traffic and road weather information acquired using connected vehicle (CV) technologies can help commuters perform safe and reliable trips. A nationwide survey of transit operation managers/supervisors was conducted to assess the suitability for CV transit applications in improving the safety [...] Read more.
Accurate and real-time traffic and road weather information acquired using connected vehicle (CV) technologies can help commuters perform safe and reliable trips. A nationwide survey of transit operation managers/supervisors was conducted to assess the suitability for CV transit applications in improving the safety and mobility during winter weather. Almost all respondents expressed positive attitudes towards the potential of CV applications in improving winter transit travel and voiced their concerns over the safety consequences of CV equipment failure, potential of increased driver distraction, and reliability of system performance in poor weather. A concept of operations of CV applications for multimodal winter travel was developed. In the conceptual framework, route-specific road weather and traffic flow data will be used by the transit managers/supervisors to obtain real-time operational status, forecast operational routes and schedules, and assess operational performance. Subsequently, multimodal commuters can receive the road-weather and traffic-flow information as well as transit routes and schedule information. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
An Experimental Approach to Understanding the Impacts of Monitoring Methods on Use Intentions for Autonomous Vehicle Services: Survey Evidence from Japan
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2157; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062157 - 11 Mar 2020
Abstract
Safety guidelines for autonomous vehicles (AVs) in many regions or countries require AV service providers to have the means to communicate with vehicles and the ability to stop them safely in case of emergencies. The transition to full deployment of AV services is [...] Read more.
Safety guidelines for autonomous vehicles (AVs) in many regions or countries require AV service providers to have the means to communicate with vehicles and the ability to stop them safely in case of emergencies. The transition to full deployment of AV services is dependent on more advanced monitoring methods. This study uses a survey of approximately 2000 residents of Japanese cities to investigate how monitoring methods affect their intentions to use these services. In particular, the survey is designed to understand how individuals react to unattended operations and remote monitoring in road passenger services including buses and taxis; the survey includes direct questions about intentions to use autonomous buses and taxis and a stated choice experiment based on the respondents’ preferences over their current mode of transportation and autonomous taxis. The results show that monitoring methods have mixed impacts. On one hand, monitoring could affect the general acceptance of AV services. The difference in the overall resistance to using these services is particularly large between the onboard human and remote monitoring options. Individuals tend to express stronger resistance to more advanced remote monitoring. On the other hand, the stated choice results show that the effects of these monitoring factors could be less significant in the actual settings of transportation mode choices; the effects of travel cost and time factors are likely to be more significant. These results suggest that when individuals consider AVs in the context of real-world decisions, their resistance to new technologies is diminished in comparison to their responses to abstract questions. Full article
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