Software Quality Metrics and Measurement

A special issue of Standards (ISSN 2305-6703). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronics and Telecommunications Standardization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 2086

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Management Science and Technology, University of Patras, 1 M. Alexandrou st., 26335 Patras, Greece
Interests: software quality; quality standards; quality frameworks; e-commerce; digital marketing

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Management Science and Technology, University of Patras, 1 M. Alexandrou st., 26335 Patras, Greece
Interests: software engineering; system evalution

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The software industry is steadily moving towards the adoption of the software-as-a-service model. A factor that is gaining increasing attention is the quality of the software, not solely measured in terms of availability, functionality or security but in numerous other facets such as user experience, suitability, appropriateness and completeness, among others. Designing quality software in critical domains such as e-business is one battle that needs to be won in this war. Tools such as formal standards are key weapons in the formalization of quality evaluation and metrics are spearheading their practical application.

Metrics (and the appropriate measurement methods) reflect the quality of both the services and data of a software system. They can be measured at different stages of the software lifecycle and from different aspects. Assigning values to metrics and interpreting the results ​​is a critical point for moving the software to the next stage of the lifecycle or for getting feedback that will guide corrections, upgrades or maintenance.

Using software quality metrics as a means of improving the efficiency of the software lifecycle offers several interesting and challenging research avenues in both academia and industry. The Special Issue on “Software Quality Metrics and Measurement” aims to capture recent trends in innovative practices to systematically design, measure, evaluate, interpret and use software quality metrics during the software development lifecycle across a range of applications including e-business, e-learning and e-marketing.

Dr. Antonia Stefani
Dr. Bill Vassiliadis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • software quality
  • software metrics
  • software standards
  • e-commerce systems quality
  • quality of digital services
  • quality frameworks
  • measurement methods for quality metrics
  • system evaluation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

33 pages, 4257 KiB  
Article
Finest Magic Cloth or a Naked Emperor? The SKQuest Data Set on Software Metrics for Improving Transparency and Quality
by Christian R. Prause and Ralf Gerlich
Standards 2023, 3(2), 136-168; https://doi.org/10.3390/standards3020012 - 4 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1594
Abstract
Software development has a problem with transparency/visibility. As an intangible product, software and its intermediate development results are hard to see or touch. Customers of custom software have difficulties checking progress, and risk coming out with costly but low-quality software. In the space [...] Read more.
Software development has a problem with transparency/visibility. As an intangible product, software and its intermediate development results are hard to see or touch. Customers of custom software have difficulties checking progress, and risk coming out with costly but low-quality software. In the space domain with its often expensive and one-of-a-kind devices, which are developed in complex multitier supply chains, the risk is even greater. This paper presents the SKQuest data set. It contains the completed responses with 190 variables from an empirical study with over 100 software experts. The data set covers distinct aspects of measuring metrics and transparency in software projects. To show what information lies in the data set, the paper investigates, and affirms, from different perspectives, the following questions: Is transparency a problem in software development projects? Is there a desire for more transparency in projects? Can metrics contribute to improving the situation? Moreover, it attempts to replicate the results of an earlier study. The main contribution of this paper is, however, the SKQuest data set that is published with this paper in CSV formatas. It is a tool that enables systematic investigations of software metrics and allows research on how they can improve the efficiency of the software lifecycle, not limited to, but particularly with respect to transparency. Consequently, the paper may serve as a starting point for future research avenues in academia and industry and help to improve existing and future standards in software development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Software Quality Metrics and Measurement)
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