Special Issue "Emotions in Sports and Exercise"

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Darko Jekauc
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Sport Sciences, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main. Frankfurt am Main 60323, Germany
Interests: emotions; affective states; physical activity; sports; mindfulness; emotional competences

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Emotions and related affective constructs are a central part of both sport and exercise. The relationship between emotions and sport and exercise can be regarded as reciprocal. On the one hand, emotions influence actions and decisions, thereby, either facilitating or debilitating sport performance. Moreover, emotions during exercise are considered crucial for individuals’ continued exercise participation. On the other hand, the very nature of sport competitions involving athletes and coaches succeeding or failing at achieving personally relevant goals can trigger intense emotions. Physical activity is shown to change emotional states and can even work in conjunction with traditional forms of medicine as a form of treatment or the prevention of clinical disorders. Research also highlights the role of emotions in physical education as a catalyst in the learning process.

Most people would probably intuitively agree with the paramount importance of emotions in sport and exercise. However, compared to predominant cognitive approaches, research on the role of emotions in these fields is rather scarce and many aspects regarding their relationship are still unknown. For this reason, the goal of this Special Issue is to address this shortcoming and pool research endeavors to strengthen our knowledge about the role of emotions in the field of sport and exercise, as well as physical education.

Prof. Dr. Darko Jekauc
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Emotion
  • Affect
  • Exercise
  • Physical Activity
  • Sports

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Young Pacific Male Rugby Players’ Perceptions and Experiences of Mental Wellbeing
Sports 2019, 7(4), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7040083 - 05 Apr 2019
Abstract
Recent studies and increased media reporting across Australasia have linked young Pacific male elite athletes to depression, suicide, and other adverse mental health-related events. Despite these accounts, little is known about the way this group experience emotions and mental wellbeing. The aim of [...] Read more.
Recent studies and increased media reporting across Australasia have linked young Pacific male elite athletes to depression, suicide, and other adverse mental health-related events. Despite these accounts, little is known about the way this group experience emotions and mental wellbeing. The aim of this study was to explore young Pacific male athletes’ perceptions and experiences of emotions and mental wellbeing. This qualitative study involved 20 face-to-face interviews with young Pacific males (16–24 years) engaged in elite rugby union and rugby league programmes in Auckland, New Zealand. The results identified that athletes defined mental wellbeing in a holistic and relational manner and perceived mental wellbeing as the culmination of several interconnected factors, including: Family support, reciprocating family support, living a ‘well-balanced’ life, athletic performance, and personal development away from sports. The maintenance of a well-balanced athletic identity and positive social relations were deemed central to sustaining mental wellbeing for these young men. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotions in Sports and Exercise)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Coach Competences to Induce Positive Affective Reactions in Sport and Exercise—A Qualitative Study
Sports 2019, 7(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7010016 - 08 Jan 2019
Abstract
Positive affective reactions are a crucial aspect in physical activity maintenance. Affective reactions to sport and exercise were found to be important factors of physical activity. Coaches could be an important medium to induce positive affective reactions of participants in sport and exercise. [...] Read more.
Positive affective reactions are a crucial aspect in physical activity maintenance. Affective reactions to sport and exercise were found to be important factors of physical activity. Coaches could be an important medium to induce positive affective reactions of participants in sport and exercise. Understanding how coaches trigger positive affective reactions (AR) during physical activity is a crucial aspect for increasing maintenance in sport and exercise. The aim of this study is to identify the competences of the coaches which are associated with perceived positive AR of participants during sport and exercise. To identify these factors, semistructured in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 participants, who take part in sport and exercise (nine female and nine male) of heterogeneous age (mean age 42.6; SD = 19.25; under 30 years, 30 to 60 years, 60 years and above) and who have different athletic backgrounds (individual sports, team sports, and gym classes). Four key coach competence factors were identified and used to design an integrated model. Three general competences: context sensitivity, social–emotional competences, professional competences, and the specific competences in the behaviour-related competences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotions in Sports and Exercise)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Students’ Emotional Experience in Physical Education—A Qualitative Study for New Theoretical Insights
Sports 2019, 7(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7010010 - 03 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Physical education (PE) can be the starting point for many students to be physically active throughout their lives. Positive emotional experiences in PE are discussed as beneficial for long-term physical activity, however, triggers of students’ emotions are still unclear. The purpose of this [...] Read more.
Physical education (PE) can be the starting point for many students to be physically active throughout their lives. Positive emotional experiences in PE are discussed as beneficial for long-term physical activity, however, triggers of students’ emotions are still unclear. The purpose of this study is to explore, from a student’s perspective, emotions and their triggers, which occur in PE classes. N = 12 students (male: six, female: six, ø-age: 15.6 ± 1.2 years) have been interviewed using a focused semi-structured interview to identify their emotions in PE and to explore the situations in which they occurred. An inductive approach with elements of the Grounded Theory Method was implemented to analyze the data. Students reported a wide range of positive and negative emotions. Furthermore, four crucial triggers were identified: (I) Attractiveness of the task, (II) social belonging, (III) competence and (IV) autonomy. Parallels to existing theories, especially the Self-Determination Theory (SDT), will be discussed. These results can be used to improve teachers’ knowledge about students’ emotions in PE in order to build a basis for lifelong physical activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotions in Sports and Exercise)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Resistance Exercise on Appetite and Affect Following Pre-Sleep Feeding
Sports 2018, 6(4), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040172 - 11 Dec 2018
Abstract
To determine changes in appetite, affect and cortisol in response to an acute bout of resistance exercise (RE) the morning after consuming whey (WP) and casein (CP) protein and a non-caloric placebo (PLA) consumed pre-sleep, 14 active men (n = 5) and women [...] Read more.
To determine changes in appetite, affect and cortisol in response to an acute bout of resistance exercise (RE) the morning after consuming whey (WP) and casein (CP) protein and a non-caloric placebo (PLA) consumed pre-sleep, 14 active men (n = 5) and women (n = 9) consumed a single dose of 24 g WP, 48 g WP, 24 g CP, 48 g CP, or PLA 30 min pre-sleep. Prior to and immediately after RE, appetite, affect and cortisol were assessed. Significant time effects were observed for Energetic Arousal and Tense Arousal (p = 0.017) and Feeling Scale and Felt Arousal Scale (p < 0.001). Appetite did not change over time or condition. Cortisol levels increased after RE (p = 0.007). Pre-RE, Tense Arousal was correlated with hunger (r = 0.25, p = 0.047) and desire to eat (r = 0.35, p = 0.005). Post-RE, cortisol was found to be significantly related to Feeling Scale (r = 0.32, p = 0.018), Felt Arousal Scale (r = 0.33, p = 0.015) and Energetic Arousal (r = 0.32, p = 0.018). Varying doses of WP and CP pre-sleep did not have an effect on morning appetite and cortisol, but cortisol was found to be related to affect and appetite. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotions in Sports and Exercise)
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Open AccessArticle
Analyzing the Components of Emotional Competence of Football Coaches: A Qualitative Study from the Coaches’ Perspective
Sports 2018, 6(4), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040123 - 23 Oct 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Emotional Competence (EC) is regarded as a fundamental skill for sports coaches. However, the applications of EC in football coaching are not well understood. This study analyzed the specific emotional processes football coaches experience. We interviewed 18 football coaches and analyzed the interview [...] Read more.
Emotional Competence (EC) is regarded as a fundamental skill for sports coaches. However, the applications of EC in football coaching are not well understood. This study analyzed the specific emotional processes football coaches experience. We interviewed 18 football coaches and analyzed the interview transcripts by using a systematic analysis process based on Grounded Theory principles. We derived a model from this analysis that comprises a four-phase process: emotional triggers, emotional experiences, emotion regulation strategies, and emotional consequences. In this model, we identified four categories which act as triggers of emotions in football coaches. These emotions can be positive or negative and are manifested at three levels. However, the coaches vary in their capability to perceive emotions. Our model also shows that coaches’ emotion regulation strategies influence the effect of emotional experiences. Experienced emotions promote consequences with psychological and social implications for coaches and may influence their perception of future situations. In short, the process seems to be circular. This finding suggests that the ability to deal with emotions is an important aspect for football coaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotions in Sports and Exercise)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Influence of Emotional Intelligence on Performance in Competitive Sports: A Meta-Analytical Investigation
Sports 2018, 6(4), 175; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040175 - 13 Dec 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
Emotional intelligence (EI) is considered as a factor influencing sport performance. The research findings are inconsistent with respect to the size and even the direction of the relationship, however. In order to summarise the available evidence, we conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship [...] Read more.
Emotional intelligence (EI) is considered as a factor influencing sport performance. The research findings are inconsistent with respect to the size and even the direction of the relationship, however. In order to summarise the available evidence, we conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and sports performance in competitive sports. A systematic literature search was conducted in June 2018. We identified 21 studies targeting EI and sports performance in competitive sports. We calculated correlation (r) to estimate the effect of the relationship. A random effects model was used to interpret findings. The meta-analysis of 22 effect sizes on the response of 3.431 participants found a small but significant relationship between EI and sports performance (r = 0.16). Additionally, the conceptualisation of EI (ability concept, trait concept, or mixed-model concept), type of publication, citation counts, and publication date turned out not to be significant moderators. Overall, the result is encouraging regarding the value of EI as a possible predictor in sports performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotions in Sports and Exercise)
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